Discuss Is the potential elec output worth the effort? in the Electrical Engineering Chat area at ElectriciansForums.net

Lucien Nunes

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As I posted in the last thread about this, the SeaPower machine is basically an unorthodox design of compressed-air motor, using balloons as flexible pistons of variable area. It has certain advantages and disadvantages relative to conventional rotary or reciprocating air-motors such as can be found in air-tools such as grinders and jackhammers, but it is fundamentally the same thing. It has no characteristics that make it a source of energy, it's just an air-motor.
 

PEG

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This is the quandary,of tidal power,a colossal,guaranteed movement of billions of cubic meters,of a medium we know can be used to power turbines...but...a change of direction,and slack periods,make for limitations,on overall,average output.

I have read some interesting proposals,over the years,to get water where it needs to be...even one using giant sponges :)
 
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Principles to run the machine

[1] an expandable enclosed container (X) of air submerged in water has a lifting force (Y) equal to the volume of the water displaced minus the weight of the container;

[2] connection multiple containers one on top of the other creates a combined lifting force of (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)= (X) = the torque force

Which is a greater lifting force than (Y);

[3] the energy needed to fill one container is equal to the energy needed to sustain the combined lifting force of the 10 (ten) containersseaengine -.jpg
 

Pete999

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Principles to run the machine

[1] an expandable enclosed container (X) of air submerged in water has a lifting force (Y) equal to the volume of the water displaced minus the weight of the container;

[2] connection multiple containers one on top of the other creates a combined lifting force of (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)+ (Y)= (X) = the torque force

Which is a greater lifting force than (Y);

[3] the energy needed to fill one container is equal to the energy needed to sustain the combined lifting force of the 10 (ten) containersView attachment 59703
And?, , ,
 
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I understand what you are saying. The question is how much energy does it take to pump the air to a given depth for which the combined torque exceeds the amount of energy required to pump the air down there. kinda like a water wheel generator but in reverse. That is a damn good question but I would think it may consume more energy than it produces. Why not just run a straight pipe into the depth of the ocean and let the pressure from below force water out the top and capture that energy?
 
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I understand what you are saying. The question is how much energy does it take to pump the air to a given depth for which the combined torque exceeds the amount of energy required to pump the air down there. kinda like a water wheel generator but in reverse. That is a damn good question but I would think it may consume more energy than it produces. Why not just run a straight pipe into the depth of the ocean and let the pressure from below force water out the top and capture that energy?
or why not electrolize the sea water producing hho gas capture it in your container and retrieve it at the surface for further energy production. What is the sustainability of that process? Any net gain there? It would probably be more efficient than pumping air down.
 

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