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Discuss Induction cooker hardwiring 32amp in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi All,

We are in the process of replacing our gas hob to an induction hob (7.35 KW, 32 Amp). Our electrician suggested that we get a radical circuit terminated at a 32 amp RCBO. There are currently double pole switches for exhaust and washing machine hanging from another ring main. Our idea is to have a grid with switches for all three appliance in one grid. Our electrician suggested that he can run the radical circuit to a 32 amp switch module in the grid, and use 20 amp switch modules for the exhaust and washing machine.

Following are my doubts:

1. Should we get a 32 amp or 40 amp RCBO
2. As per the induction cooker, it says "This product requires hardwiring to a 32 Amp fuse". The separate radical circuit and 32 amp switch would suffice?

32 amp switch : UK Electrical Supplies - https://www.ukelectricalsupplies.com/click-minigrid-md032wh-32a-double-pole-twin-width-blank-switch-module-white.htm

Induction cooker:
AEG IKE64441FB Electric Induction Hob - Black - https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/household-appliances/cooking/hobs/aeg-ike64441fb-electric-induction-hob-black-10178521-pdt.html

Thanks in advance
 
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mattg4321

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Arms
Esteemed
If you don't trust your presumably qualified, experienced and competent electrician, I suggest you find another that you do trust.
 

Midwest

-
Arms
Esteemed
Lets be nice. :)

I would suggest that would be a poor design, to have all such appliances on the one circuit; not a great admirer of using grid switches for appliance, although its used extensively on new builds, primarily to comply with Part M, I think.

What is your current kitchen wiring set up @vineeth?
 
O

Octopus

If your spark is suggesting a 32A circuit for the hob, washing machine and cooker hood I would say he’s wrong.

Fixed appliances such as hobs should be on their own dedicated circuit .....
 

Charlie_

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Arms
Do you do a lot of cooking and tend to have all the rings on for a decent amount of time?
That hob is rated at 7.35 kw so right on the limit if you’re an enthusiastic cook
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Hey All,

Thanks a lot for the inputs. Guess I was not clear with my original post. Currently there are 2 ring mains:
[1] 32amp ring main where all appliances are connected
[2] Cooker ring main with a combi microwave and an oven.

The plan is to add another 32 amp radical circuit off a RCBO just for the induction cooker. The grid would have two 20amp switches (For dishwasher and exhaust from Ring main 1), and a 32amp switch (For the induction hob from the new 32amp radical circuit.
 

Pete999

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Arms
Esteemed
Hi All,

We are in the process of replacing our gas hob to an induction hob (7.35 KW, 32 Amp). Our electrician suggested that we get a radical circuit terminated at a 32 amp RCBO. There are currently double pole switches for exhaust and washing machine hanging from another ring main. Our idea is to have a grid with switches for all three appliance in one grid. Our electrician suggested that he can run the radical circuit to a 32 amp switch module in the grid, and use 20 amp switch modules for the exhaust and washing machine.

Following are my doubts:

1. Should we get a 32 amp or 40 amp RCBO
2. As per the induction cooker, it says "This product requires hardwiring to a 32 Amp fuse". The separate radical circuit and 32 amp switch would suffice?

32 amp switch : UK Electrical Supplies - https://www.ukelectricalsupplies.com/click-minigrid-md032wh-32a-double-pole-twin-width-blank-switch-module-white.htm

Induction cooker:
AEG IKE64441FB Electric Induction Hob - Black - https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/household-appliances/cooking/hobs/aeg-ike64441fb-electric-induction-hob-black-10178521-pdt.html

Thanks in advance
That would be RADIAL circuit Vin
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Hey Pete / Charlie / Matt, thanks for the info. I guess the radical circuit would be best option to go for. Just have the doubt on whether I could use that 32 amp switch to hardwire the cooker on to this radical circuit. Hope I am making sense :)
 

Midwest

-
Arms
Esteemed
Hey All,

Thanks a lot for the inputs. Guess I was not clear with my original post. Currently there are 2 ring mains:
[1] 32amp ring main where all appliances are connected
[2] Cooker ring main with a combi microwave and an oven.

The plan is to add another 32 amp radical circuit off a RCBO just for the induction cooker. The grid would have two 20amp switches (For dishwasher and exhaust from Ring main 1), and a 32amp switch (For the induction hob from the new 32amp radical circuit.
This all seems awfully complicated.
 

Charlie_

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Arms
The thing is with those type of hobs is that the combined load of all 4 hobs is about 10kW..
When all hobs are switched on the overall load is reduced..
In some instances I would apply diversity; such as the overall maximum demand but not for a single supply to this type of hob if it is known that it will be used at full power for long durations
 
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