Discuss Socket overload danger? in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Reaction score
0
Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

In my kitchen there is a "Socket On Off" switch in the same console as the cooker master on/off switch. The cooker switch is almost always off.
An extension lead to the "Socket On/Off" switch has the following appliances attached
1. 14.5w low energy lamp
2. Microwave over 650 W output
3. Microwave oven 850 W output
4. Electric kettle "2500 - 3000 kW"
5. Toaster "965 -1150 W"

I suspect that in total the above exceeds the safe load limit for the socket so I try never to have all appliances switched on simultaneously. Could someone please tell me how near the limit I am - or even if I would exceed it - so that I can work out what combination of appliances can in fact be run simultaneously. [The electric kettle is obviously the key component] Tks
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
Logical solution I accept but "finding a different socket" would be far more hassle than applying informed common sense as I have tried to do up to now. >> If the kettle is switched on what leeway do I have to use any of the other items at the same time? There is a consumer unit installed in case of an overload but obviously I would prefer not to use it in the first place. Tks
 

telectrix

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
65,532
kettle is 13A, your cooker circuit (includibg the attached socket) is generally 32A, so plenty to cope. esp. as the kettle is onlyon for a few minutes at a time. the only worry could be the extension lead overheating or contacts burning out, as the are only designed for 13A tops.
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
Thanks that was my confusion - the limit of my "kitchen socket".
To prevent extension lead melt down, as you advise, how can I calculate the amps taken by my various appliances in order to stay within 13 A overall? I have forgotten the conversion factor. I think my UK voltage is 230V?
 

Taylortwocities

-
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
2,873
Your extension lead plug has a 13amp fuse in it. That will limit the current to anything that is connected.
Note that the actual current, where a BS 1362 fuse will blow, is about 1.66 times the rated value, so for a 13A fuse this will be 21.6A. Multi-way extension leads are not designed to sustain that sort of current, they will and do die horribly.

I think my UK voltage is 230V
230v is the nominal voltage. This is roughly + or - 10% of the nominal. 240v is more the average.

Very very bad idea to run these sort of appliances from an extension lead of any sort. The manufacturer's instructions usually will tell you not to. I know its a faff to do things properly, if you cant have enough sockets installed, invest in a smoke alarm, and a fire extinguisher.
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
Thanks. The conclusion that I have arrived at is not to use the kettle in conjunction with anything else, only solo, in addition to my smoke alarm and fire extinguisher. May not tick all the boxes, but is what gut feel has been telling me over the past umpteen years. Hopefully sticking to 13 A rather than 21.6 overall will provide a certain safety margin.
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
I would not rule that out though it would not be simple. In the interim I'm thinking of using a 2-way adaptor (correct term?) to split the kettle circuit off from the other appliances to provide an extra safety margin in case I switch it on "by mistake".
 

Avo Mk8

-
Esteemed
Reaction score
415
In my kitchen there is a "Socket On Off" switch in the same console as the cooker master on/off switch. The cooker switch is almost always off.
An extension lead to the "Socket On/Off" switch has the following appliances attached
1. 14.5w low energy lamp
2. Microwave over 650 W output
3. Microwave oven 850 W output
4. Electric kettle "2500 - 3000 kW"
5. Toaster "965 -1150 W"

I suspect that in total the above exceeds the safe load limit for the socket so I try never to have all appliances switched on simultaneously. Could someone please tell me how near the limit I am - or even if I would exceed it - so that I can work out what combination of appliances can in fact be run simultaneously. [The electric kettle is obviously the key component] Tks
If you want to work it out, my personal (very approximate) approach is to say 1000 watts takes 4amps (or 250watts takes 1 amp etc.) so you do the maths. If you want to be accurate, and you know your mains voltage (eg 240) use the laws of physics: Amps = Watts divided by Volts.
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
So that would allow me to run 1 kettle's worth of current through my extension with only a fraction to spare. Whilst I am sure that I must have exceeded this on many occasions in the past, caution tells me that it would be better to split the circuits as above taking into account what this thread has told me.
 

telectrix

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
65,532
your extension lead is protected by it's plug fuse, 13A. this will tolerate upto 20A for short periods. those splitteradaptors have no protection from the contacts being stressed by hanging plugs and cords from them and are a fire risk. if you have one, bin it.
 

Lucien Nunes

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
9,960
The contacts in the wall-mounted socket that is part of the cooker control switch are rated for 13A maximum (although the cooker circuit would generally be 32A, the socket is a regular 13A socket.) If you plug in a fused adaptor, the fuse in that will protect it and the socket, but like a plug fuse will run hot if marginally overloaded until it blows. If you have an old unfused adaptor, that would defeat the fuse protection and allow you to substantially overload the wall-mounted socket.

Note also that the current consumption of a microwave oven is significantly higher than the figure you would get if you divide the cooking output wattage by the voltage. Allow 5-6A for a microwave up to 900W.
 

littlespark

-
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
9,878
move some of those appliances to another socket, even if it is in another room!

An electrician could use the cooker cable to supply a small garage type distribution board, and from that a group of sockets. protected properly, for you to power everything safely. You must have a very small kitchen or very badly designed locations for sockets.
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
The above advice, tks, would seem in total to overrule what I concluded was the logical solution: To have a "circuit splitter" plugged into the cooker console socket that would separate the output from the 32 A supply into two independent circuits each protected by a 13 A fuse. I don't know if such a gismo (hardly rocket science) exists, but the vibes I seem to be getting if I have understood correctly are to forget it?
 

pc1966

Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
6,232
..that would separate the output from the 32 A supply into two independent circuits each protected by a 13 A fuse. I don't know if such a gismo (hardly rocket science) exists...
It does exist. It is a double 13A socket fitted to the wall and part of either the ring circuit or a suitably rated cable spur taken off the cooker's supply.

Really a multi-socket extension block is only suited to things like computers / TV setups where the total load is below 13A (3kW) but you have multiple low power things all needing power.

Once you have any two items that will go over 13A you should not be looking at that at all. Even a double socket is only rated at 20A total, so if you are planning on having two approx 3kW loads plugged in (e.g. washing machine and tumble dryer) you are better to fit two single 13A sockets.
 

ipf

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
5,576
I've been humming T Rex for the last half hour?......it's boring.

Me I funk, but I don't care, I ain't no square with my corkscrew hair............???
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
The textbook solution would be to put in a separate extra single or double 13A socket as you say. This would however be a messy operation involving a plasterer / decorator in addition to an electrician. The question is therefore:
Is there a less-than-ideal alternative "solution" that I could adopt which would nonetheless be an improvement over the Heath Robinson extension lead arrangement that I have been using over the past decade or two? On the basis that the most powerful single appliance that would be used at any one time would be the 3 kW kettle, and I would intend not to have this on at the same time as the "965 - 1150W" toaster.
 

telectrix

-
Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
Reaction score
65,532
in your first post you said that the cooker switch was always off. this indicated that it no longer powers a cooker, so you could change it for a double socket.
 
OP
T
Reaction score
0
Sorry if this was ambiguous. The reason that the cooker master switch itself is almost always "off" is because I use the microwaves instead of the cooker (!) Once in a blue moon I would switch the cooker on. The socket in the console next to the cooker switch is what I have the extension lead plugged in to.
 

Reply to Socket overload danger? in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Electrical News from Electricians Forums and Friends

E
  • Article
Want to become a qualified electrician? Look carefully at the training courses on offer to avoid wasting time and money, is the advice in a new campaign from electrical industry body The Electrotechnical Skills Partnership (TESP). With thousands of searches each year on terms such as...
Replies
49
Views
6K
Marty92
Dan
  • Article
You can now link your account with social media by going to the following page. https://www.electriciansforums.net/account/connected-accounts/ We had this feature some time ago but I removed it when Facebook was found to be selling the data they collected without informing the users of what...
Replies
0
Views
2K
Dan
Dan
  • Article
There was a dodgy advert, typical clickbait, showing "how to save 90% on your electricity bill" which was not the case and it was actually showing some dangerous wiring tactics. Read the actual threads here:- What should be the code for this - C2 or C3 -...
Replies
37
Views
8K
Jurassic Sparks
Jurassic Sparks
James
  • Article
The Go Plus hot tub is being recalled because you could get electrocuted taking a dip, according to press releases from the Chartered Trading Standards Institute (CTSI). An Amazon spokesperson said: "Safety is a top priority at Amazon. "We require all products offered in our store to comply...
Replies
6
Views
3K
Dave Appleby
D
Dan
  • Article
Posted on behalf of @CKI:C.K-Tools Carl Kammerling International Ltd, also known to as ‘CKI’, are the company behind the C.K Tools brand. Founded in Germany in 1904 and with roots stretching back to 1790, we provide a wide range of hand tools, tool storage, power tool accessories and...
Replies
2
Views
4K
telectrix
telectrix

New Posts (Please Reply)

Search Forum

Electrical Forum

Welcome to the Electrical Forum at ElectriciansForums.net. The friendliest electrical forum online. General electrical questions and answers can be found in the electrical forum.
Top