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In my kitchen there is a "Socket On Off" switch in the same console as the cooker master on/off switch. The cooker switch is almost always off.
An extension lead to the "Socket On/Off" switch has the following appliances attached
1. 14.5w low energy lamp
2. Microwave over 650 W output
3. Microwave oven 850 W output
4. Electric kettle "2500 - 3000 kW"
5. Toaster "965 -1150 W"

I suspect that in total the above exceeds the safe load limit for the socket so I try never to have all appliances switched on simultaneously. Could someone please tell me how near the limit I am - or even if I would exceed it - so that I can work out what combination of appliances can in fact be run simultaneously. [The electric kettle is obviously the key component] Tks
 

telectrix

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first find a different socket to plug the kettle into. the xtension lead should cope with the rest, although not ideal, it's 13A fuse will blow if overloaded.
 
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Logical solution I accept but "finding a different socket" would be far more hassle than applying informed common sense as I have tried to do up to now. >> If the kettle is switched on what leeway do I have to use any of the other items at the same time? There is a consumer unit installed in case of an overload but obviously I would prefer not to use it in the first place. Tks
 

telectrix

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kettle is 13A, your cooker circuit (includibg the attached socket) is generally 32A, so plenty to cope. esp. as the kettle is onlyon for a few minutes at a time. the only worry could be the extension lead overheating or contacts burning out, as the are only designed for 13A tops.
 
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Thanks that was my confusion - the limit of my "kitchen socket".
To prevent extension lead melt down, as you advise, how can I calculate the amps taken by my various appliances in order to stay within 13 A overall? I have forgotten the conversion factor. I think my UK voltage is 230V?
 

Taylortwocities

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Your extension lead plug has a 13amp fuse in it. That will limit the current to anything that is connected.
Note that the actual current, where a BS 1362 fuse will blow, is about 1.66 times the rated value, so for a 13A fuse this will be 21.6A. Multi-way extension leads are not designed to sustain that sort of current, they will and do die horribly.

I think my UK voltage is 230V
230v is the nominal voltage. This is roughly + or - 10% of the nominal. 240v is more the average.

Very very bad idea to run these sort of appliances from an extension lead of any sort. The manufacturer's instructions usually will tell you not to. I know its a faff to do things properly, if you cant have enough sockets installed, invest in a smoke alarm, and a fire extinguisher.
 
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Thanks. The conclusion that I have arrived at is not to use the kettle in conjunction with anything else, only solo, in addition to my smoke alarm and fire extinguisher. May not tick all the boxes, but is what gut feel has been telling me over the past umpteen years. Hopefully sticking to 13 A rather than 21.6 overall will provide a certain safety margin.
 
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I would not rule that out though it would not be simple. In the interim I'm thinking of using a 2-way adaptor (correct term?) to split the kettle circuit off from the other appliances to provide an extra safety margin in case I switch it on "by mistake".
 
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In my kitchen there is a "Socket On Off" switch in the same console as the cooker master on/off switch. The cooker switch is almost always off.
An extension lead to the "Socket On/Off" switch has the following appliances attached
1. 14.5w low energy lamp
2. Microwave over 650 W output
3. Microwave oven 850 W output
4. Electric kettle "2500 - 3000 kW"
5. Toaster "965 -1150 W"

I suspect that in total the above exceeds the safe load limit for the socket so I try never to have all appliances switched on simultaneously. Could someone please tell me how near the limit I am - or even if I would exceed it - so that I can work out what combination of appliances can in fact be run simultaneously. [The electric kettle is obviously the key component] Tks
If you want to work it out, my personal (very approximate) approach is to say 1000 watts takes 4amps (or 250watts takes 1 amp etc.) so you do the maths. If you want to be accurate, and you know your mains voltage (eg 240) use the laws of physics: Amps = Watts divided by Volts.
 

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