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So that would allow me to run 1 kettle's worth of current through my extension with only a fraction to spare. Whilst I am sure that I must have exceeded this on many occasions in the past, caution tells me that it would be better to split the circuits as above taking into account what this thread has told me.
 
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telectrix

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your extension lead is protected by it's plug fuse, 13A. this will tolerate upto 20A for short periods. those splitteradaptors have no protection from the contacts being stressed by hanging plugs and cords from them and are a fire risk. if you have one, bin it.
 

Lucien Nunes

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The contacts in the wall-mounted socket that is part of the cooker control switch are rated for 13A maximum (although the cooker circuit would generally be 32A, the socket is a regular 13A socket.) If you plug in a fused adaptor, the fuse in that will protect it and the socket, but like a plug fuse will run hot if marginally overloaded until it blows. If you have an old unfused adaptor, that would defeat the fuse protection and allow you to substantially overload the wall-mounted socket.

Note also that the current consumption of a microwave oven is significantly higher than the figure you would get if you divide the cooking output wattage by the voltage. Allow 5-6A for a microwave up to 900W.
 

littlespark

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move some of those appliances to another socket, even if it is in another room!

An electrician could use the cooker cable to supply a small garage type distribution board, and from that a group of sockets. protected properly, for you to power everything safely. You must have a very small kitchen or very badly designed locations for sockets.
 
The above advice, tks, would seem in total to overrule what I concluded was the logical solution: To have a "circuit splitter" plugged into the cooker console socket that would separate the output from the 32 A supply into two independent circuits each protected by a 13 A fuse. I don't know if such a gismo (hardly rocket science) exists, but the vibes I seem to be getting if I have understood correctly are to forget it?
 

pc1966

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..that would separate the output from the 32 A supply into two independent circuits each protected by a 13 A fuse. I don't know if such a gismo (hardly rocket science) exists...
It does exist. It is a double 13A socket fitted to the wall and part of either the ring circuit or a suitably rated cable spur taken off the cooker's supply.

Really a multi-socket extension block is only suited to things like computers / TV setups where the total load is below 13A (3kW) but you have multiple low power things all needing power.

Once you have any two items that will go over 13A you should not be looking at that at all. Even a double socket is only rated at 20A total, so if you are planning on having two approx 3kW loads plugged in (e.g. washing machine and tumble dryer) you are better to fit two single 13A sockets.
 

ipf

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I've been humming T Rex for the last half hour?......it's boring.

Me I funk, but I don't care, I ain't no square with my corkscrew hair............???
 
The textbook solution would be to put in a separate extra single or double 13A socket as you say. This would however be a messy operation involving a plasterer / decorator in addition to an electrician. The question is therefore:
Is there a less-than-ideal alternative "solution" that I could adopt which would nonetheless be an improvement over the Heath Robinson extension lead arrangement that I have been using over the past decade or two? On the basis that the most powerful single appliance that would be used at any one time would be the 3 kW kettle, and I would intend not to have this on at the same time as the "965 - 1150W" toaster.
 

telectrix

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in your first post you said that the cooker switch was always off. this indicated that it no longer powers a cooker, so you could change it for a double socket.
 

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