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Discuss Changing single light in hall to 4 downlighters in the DIY Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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A friend is currently having the hallway light changed to 4 downlighters and then having the ceiling plastered.
(1) First question does this need to be done by a qualified electrician and does it need a Part P certificate?
It is not possible to install from the floor above so the builder has cut some small holes into the existing playerboard and fed the wires through for the various downlighters. At the joists they have to get across/through they have cut away the plaster board and run the cable below the joist (not sure if they just slightly cut into the joist to get it above the level of the plasterboard) and I presume they will then just fill in the hole and plaster over it. So the cable will only be just above the plastered ceiling
(2) Is this allowed within the wiring regulations even if they cover it with some sort of protection ?
 

Spoon

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Welcome to the forum mate.

1. As the alteration to the lighting will be a modification to an existing circuit then Part P does not apply.

Regs state:

1565173979273.png

2. The lighting circuit will need to have RCD protection if you want to add these lights. Nothing against the regs for having the cable just above a plastered ceiling.
 

Spoon

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Just to add to the above.

It is not possible to install from the floor above so the builder has cut some small holes into the existing playerboard and fed the wires through for the various downlighters.
It sounds like the builder has already done the wiring for these light.
If the builder is intending to do the wiring for the lights then inform them that you want a Minor Electrical Installation Works Certificate for the work.
This certificate is to show that the alteration to the circuit and the addition of the lights has been tested and is safe.
 

Des 56

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Please don't let them fit open connector blocks shoved into the ceiling with a bit of tape wrapped around,it is often the usual mutilation of connecting downlights by builders and others:(

Connections shoved up into the ceiling do not comply with regulations plus its one of my few pet annoyances with the work of others:)
 
you will need an rcd on the circuit...a minor works cert which includes testing signed by a competent person...so really you should get a sparky to do the work...not the builder
 

Spoon

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Why are people pedantic about the Part P thing and coming out with the usual "No such think as Part P cert"... We all know what the poster is going on about.

@SparkyChick did a great reply to this on an old post. I tried to find it but I see that the forum may have been changed but the search facility is still cack...
 

SJD

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The notifications I do generate a "Building Regulations Certificate of Compliance". Covering not just Part P, but other relevant parts of the Building Regs.

I think mostly the general public don't understand it all, and have no idea what work is notificable, or what documentation they should get.

As the risk of going off topic, I get fed up with people ring up asking me for an "electrical certificate" for their installation, when they really mean an EICR, again they've no idea.
 

Paignton pete

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I never get fed up with customers not understanding as I don’t expect them to understand electrical terminology.

I will happily explain in simple terminology as far as possible. That is part of the job.

If they refer to a consumer unit as a fuse board I accept that and normally don’t correct it. We all know what they mean.
 

SJD

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Yes, I explain. I think part of the problem is customers get asked for something e.g. by an estate agent, solicitor, etc, who don't know themselves what they should be asking for.
 

davesparks

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As the risk of going off topic, I get fed up with people ring up asking me for an "electrical certificate" for their installation, when they really mean an EICR, again they've no idea.
I don't mind if they ask for it by the wrong name, what's important is that they are in some way aware that they need their installation inspected and tested.
 

SparkyChick

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Welcome to the forum mate.

1. As the alteration to the lighting will be a modification to an existing circuit then Part P does not apply.
To clarify this point from @Spoon , the requirement for a notification may not apply but the rest of the requirements for Part P will and this includes compliance with BS 7671.

Why are people pedantic about the Part P thing and coming out with the usual "No such think as Part P cert"... We all know what the poster is going on about.

@SparkyChick did a great reply to this on an old post. I tried to find it but I see that the forum may have been changed but the search facility is still cack...
If it's pedantry you're after it's probably this one....


But if it's specifically about Part P certification it could be this one...

 

Spoon

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