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Discuss Various bits of work needed... Various questions! in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi all

Sorry the title's so vague...

We'll be having some work carried out on the house electrics soon. We've got an electrician doing most of the work, although I might do some of the bits that I am allowed to. But I am also doing a lot of the planning of the work to be done by the electrician. So I just need to clarify a few things if anyone wouldn't mind pitching in?

1. How can things be left in the area above ceilings / below first floor floors, if I want to leave provision for future sockets/lights to be added after some other work has been done on the house? Can excess cable be left or are there rules against that? That would be my preference. But if not, is putting a junction box in at this stage an acceptable approach so that the new light/socket can be taken from that?

2. What are the rules for wiring in lofts? Can cable be left loose with some slack (I'll want to insulate the loft at some point and would rather the cables are on top of the insulation)? Or must they be clipped and tight?

3. Can a bathroom light be fit by a DIYer? The wiring is already there, and so is the switch (outside the room).
So it would just be putting in a new light. I know the light has to be made for bathrooms/wet areas. Just wasn't sure if it has to be an electrician who does it because of where it is.

4. Changing single sockets to doubles with a converter. Is this allowed to be done DIY? Is it as straight forward as it looks? Anything to look out for or consider?

5. I know it is not a simple single answer, but is there a general rule of thumb for maximum cable runs for mains rings (on 2.5mm) and lighting (on 1.5mm)? With lighting, is all of the wiring counted or just some?

6. Does everything have to be tip top before the electrician can issue a certificate? For example, part of the house needs to be renovated, but in the meantime it is still being used. However, the consumer unit for this part of the house is going to be changed for a more modern / safer one. But at the same time, there are some things which aren't great... Some sockets would ideally be replaced. Some flooring is up and the wiring (and junction boxes) are therefore exposed. But I see little point in addressing these things now as the renovation will start soonish and any further electrical work done now will only have to be undone then. I'm guessing that means he won't be able to "sign it off" but wasn't sure... I guess if he can't he can always sign it off when the rest of the work is finished later in the year...

Any thoughts and help most gratefully appreciated.

Cheers
 
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My guess is you're doing the work yourself via YouTube etc and getting a Domestic Installer in at the End to test and sign it off for you.

If you had a Domestic Installer on hand you would not be posting questions.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Hi

Thanks for the replies.

Good work Poirot (Tes369) but wrong on this occasion, although I can see why you'd think that :) The electrician is coming next week to run through all the work and quote. There'll be a lot he'll be doing. He's installing two new consumer units, a number of fire/CO alarms, and a whole bunch of other stuff. But where the jobs are easily done (AND ALLOWED TO BE DONE) by a DIYer, I'd rather save the money. I'll be leaving new sockets, replacement wiring, chasing in, and all that kind of stuff to him. So that's half the reason for my post and questions...

...the other half is that I've had a lot of the floorboards up and spent a fair bit of time in the loft due to other work I've needed to do. As such, I have learnt much about the current wiring in the house and what needs to be changed. A lot of it was a serious bodge job, and now that I've got a good idea of what's what, I've also got a good idea of how I'd like it to be done now. But I want to make sure I'm not overlooking anything before asking the electrician to quote. I also know what other non-electrical work is likely to be needed in the future and what impact that might have on what's done now.

Hope that all makes sense.
 

FatAlan

-
Trainee
You obviously have a good idea of what you are aiming for. The work you have alluded to is best done at the same time the spark is there. If you are going to ask for slack to be left in cables etc in specific places talk to the spark as they will be the one who will determine what is safe or not.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
@FatAlan. I hear what you're saying, but without boring everyone with loads of details, all of the work cannot be done at the same time...

@SWD. I'll make sure I buy in plenty of biscuits :)
 
T

The Ghost

Personally I would not be happy with a diyer monkeying about with the electrics in special locations as I would be the one signing it off. I would not feel any confidence about doing so where I know a diyer has been in the works. If I had to take the time to check all your work and test it I might as well have done it myself and at about the same cost. Also parts you work on are not certified which has implications re your house insurance and selling the house in the future.
 
S

Squid

@FatAlan. I hear what you're saying, but without boring everyone with loads of details, all of the work cannot be done at the same time...

@SWD. I'll make sure I buy in plenty of biscuits :)
You'll need a load of goodwill and tallow to keep your electrician happy, you also need to discuss it with him/her as redundant circuits can be run and left in situ for future expansion as well as leaving some slack in the cables, having junction boxes all over the place can and most probably will cause problems in the future.
 

FatAlan

-
Trainee
@FatAlan. I hear what you're saying, but without boring everyone with loads of details, all of the work cannot be done at the same time...

@SWD. I'll make sure I buy in plenty of biscuits :)
Will the spark be installing work that you are looking to add to? If that’s the case, speak to them so that their work can be tailored to fit with future work.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
OK, thanks to you both for the replies.

@Vortigern I can appreciate that, but where would you draw the line? Sounds like somewhere between changing a light bulb and changing a wall socket?

@SWD Yes, I much prefer the idea of leaving cable for the future expansion instead of junction boxes. Just wasn't sure if it was allowed. I'll certainly be discussing it with him when he comes next week. It would only be needed in one or two places... One for a socket and the other for a light...

@FatAlan No, I'll most likely call them back in to do the other work. Where I wondered about leaving the extra cable in the void - that would be for a socket in the room below. But the wall has damp (and other) issues so I wouldn't want cable run in there until it has all been address. The plaster will most likely need to be removed... We'll see... But just seemed to make a lot more sense to get the wall sorted, and only then have the electrician chase in and add the socket
 
So...you have an electrician doing the work but just thought you would come to the forum to ask an electrician to answer some questions......doesnt your sparky answer questions then?
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Firstly, one electrician is coming next week. Lots are on here. I like to get a few opinions.

But secondly and more importantly, there's a lot I need to discuss with the electrician, so it's helpful to get a few of those ticked off now...

Are my questions really that bad!??!
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
Fair enough.

When we first moved in to the house things looked different then, and so was our plan on what to do with it. Back then we had some electricians come and quote for work. Each one gave a completely different opinion on what to do; right from a few bits of remedial work for much less than a grand, up to a full rewire on the old part of the house for over £3k. So sometimes it is difficult to know who to trust!

I hate dentists so I never really go... But many many years ago toothache forced me to go. I got that tooth sorted, but whilst there the dentist said I needed 2 extractions and 6 fillings. I wouldn't have done it anyhow, but when I saw what it was going to cost I definitely wasn't going back. A couple or so years later... Another toothache. Same story but this time I needed 3 extractions, 10 fillings, and a small mortgage. So again I only got the toothache sorted. A few years after that... You've guessed it - another toothache. I went to get that sorted and cringed at what I'd be told. It was a different dentist. She removed the bad tooth and said that the only other work needed was one filling. I told her the story. She said dentistry is not an exact science :)
 
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