Discuss Nice to see him go round with a torque screwdriver after... in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Dustydazzler

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Shame his main earth didn't come through the same opening as the tails.
I wonder why the pyros were redundant, what a shame.
He's quick but doesn't impress me at all.
Couldn't be bothered to watch all but also didn't see any single conductors doubled over.

is he really that quick? , most experienced sparks could make off a consumer unit in sub 2 hours if you do absolutely 0 testing of anything and absolutely no labelling etc
I reckon I could change my board in my house in under 40 minutes (it is only 4 circuits and the tester will stay in the van...
 
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Taylortwocities

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I would never use a impact driver anywhere near a cu, call me old fashioned but it would be with my hand and good old manual screwdriver.

Cutting away those MICC cables was emotional for me. lol
Agree, in fact some CU manufacturers specifically say do not do it. I guess they have had too many returns due to stripped threads!
 

Dustydazzler

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Agree, in fact some CU manufacturers specifically say do not do it. I guess they have had too many returns due to stripped threads!
I’m often tempted to slacken off all the screws with my 18v impact , but certainly won’t use it to tighten down the screws.
by hand is the only way for me , you can feel the terminal bite down and then I know it’s correct, with an impact gun you would have absolutely no feel...
 

pirate

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A "lightweight" electric screwdriver may be fine, or a drill-driver on very low setting, but tightening by hand is preferable IMHO.
As for an impact driver, that is totally the wrong tool. It is designed and operates in a specific way for specific jobs requiring tons well, netwon metres, of torque and is not designed for making electrical terminations in CUs and accessories. However, it seems that a sector of the trades believe it is de riguer to use one for everything...the clue's in the name...
I watched 2 guys boarding out a plasterboard ceiling using them...totally unnecessary and very noisy, apart from being less easy to regulate the depth.
 

Mike Johnson

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I recently built a Gazebo base in my garden using an impact driver and was very conscious of the noise and ensured when doing most of the driving my neighbours where not in their garden, they are very noisy and using them internally must drive anyone else in the property potty, mind you now days the younger generation will probably just turn the radio up.
 

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pc1966

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I have seen an electric screwdriver designed for this sort of thing - not the final torque (as that is always variable with impact tools) but just to speed tightening up. But they are expensive (£200+ I seem to remember).

Using a normal power tool is an absolute no-no as it will over-tighten the screws in the blink of an eye. I managed to shear off a M6 steel screw/nut on cable tray once by not being too careful with my small Milwaukee hex impact driver :(
 

Mike Johnson

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The normally available impact drivers that come as a set with a drill do not have a variable torque setting they are permanently set at hammer me into oblivion or cam out. 😢
 

Dustydazzler

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The irony is these guys are not cheap . Infact I have seen what they charge and it’s top end money.
the fact they lash stuff in on the hurry up doesn’t reflect their final invoice.
the big boss man must be raking it in
 

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