Discuss Why does the UK use rings for sockets? in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

Mike Johnson

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I have posted before my solution to this problem using a tray space between the appliances and putting the sockets and plugs in the tray space, some of you guys have very short memories, now what where we talking about, something about the Lord of the Rings?
 

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pc1966

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Out of interest, what are the requirements in ROI for the likes of kitchen white goods?

E.g. do they require accessible means of isolation in the wring reg or is it a building regs thing (as the Scottish building regs do).
 
rare to find enugh room behind an appliance for a plug and socket, unlees the woktop is the extra 2" wide.
That's true enough. Often though you will get away with it if it's a flush fitted socket. I rarely do that though.As kitchen plans change and I hate moving stuff I prefer to leave a loose hanging 2.5 in the nominated area for the appliance and after kitchen is fitted, check out any "favourable" spaces in cupboards first. Failing that I check out the appliance to see where the "pockets" of space are at the back and mount my socket accordingly
 
That's true enough. Often though you will get away with it if it's a flush fitted socket. I rarely do that though.As kitchen plans change and I hate moving stuff I prefer to leave a loose hanging 2.5 in the nominated area for the appliance and after kitchen is fitted, check out any "favourable" spaces in cupboards first. Failing that I check out the appliance to see where the "pockets" of space are at the back and mount my socket accordingly

My limited experience of appliances suggests those pockets of space are never the same on replacements. Ovens generally tend to have that space at the top, but with other appliances all bets are off.

I've noticed that up here sparks tend to place unswitched sockets behind sink units, when dishwasher or washing machine are fitted next to them. Something in my brain doesn't like that, but it's much more accessible than being placed behind the appliance and also deals with the issue of space.
 

pc1966

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I've noticed that up here sparks tend to place unswitched sockets behind sink units, when dishwasher or washing machine are fitted next to them. Something in my brain doesn't like that, but it's much more accessible than being placed behind the appliance and also deals with the issue of space.
Are they used with a separate isolating switch (e.g. grid switch or similar) that is accessible?
 
My limited experience of appliances suggests those pockets of space are never the same on replacements. Ovens generally tend to have that space at the top, but with other appliances all bets are off.

I've noticed that up here sparks tend to place unswitched sockets behind sink units, when dishwasher or washing machine are fitted next to them. Something in my brain doesn't like that, but it's much more accessible than being placed behind the appliance and also deals with the issue of space.
Yes. Traditionally that's the way we all did it. Many people have concerns about them been under the sink but it actually is not a problem in my view. Have never experienced a problem with it. Those who complain about a socket under the sink often ignore the fact that half the D. B, s in this this country are located in the hallway, downstairs by the frontdoor, with the upstairs bathroom directly overhead. Now that makes, me feel incomfortable
 

Mike Johnson

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Kitchen designers would pass out at the thought of any such gap. You could certainly specify it in your own home, but most customers aren't going to accept it.
I think "Kitchen Designers" is an oxymoron, the tray space is a very useful way or storing trays without taking up room in the kitchen cupboards, in a UK standard Kitchen space is at a premium with White goods as most house's do not have Utility rooms, so I feel it is an acceptable solution to the socket accessibility problem most perceive they have.
 

Zerax

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DIY
IMHO... that 'tray space' idea looks bl00dy awful ! I'd never design that into my kitchen and if a 'kitchen designer' offered that... he'd be asked to leave immediately. The only way something like that could work for me, is if that space was all lined out, with a door, including a removable rear panel that would cover all those sockets. However most kitchens are so very very tight on space, it's highly unlikely to happen. I wired up a new kitchen last week... massive space, like 15m x 5m... but even then, the units were all cut down to make them fit. Every spare millimeter was used.
 

DPG

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Must admit I'm not keen on the big gap for the sockets. Would make a nicely fitted kitchen look a bit rough. Although practically it's a good solution. I'd much rather have a socket in an adjacent unit.
 

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