Discuss Checking a second hand induction hob in the Electrical Appliances Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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pkhodgson

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Hi all,

A quick question, we are looking to purchase an induction hob and have been considering a second hand option, if one could be found that's almost new.

We have found someone selling an Electrolux one, that is claimed to be unused and looks like it is still in the packaging (minus any shrink wrap, which makes me a little cautious).

Is there any way to verify that the hob is actually functional, before parting with our cash? I'm assuming that it is not as simple as popping a plug onto it and testing it in a regular 13amp domestic socket?

Thanks!
 
TL;DR
How can you quickly check if an induction hob is functional?
SJD

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While a hob will normally need a much bigger supply than a 13A plug & socket can supply, if you restricted yourself to testing one heating element at a time, I don't see why you can't check it with a 13A plug & cable.
 
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pkhodgson

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While a hob will normally need a much bigger supply than a 13A plug & socket can supply, if you restricted yourself to testing one heating element at a time, I don't see why you can't check it with a 13A plug & cable.
Thank you for the quick reply.

Yes that did occur to me, and I agree; one element at a time and just a quick check.
 
littlespark

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Depending on price for second hand, I’d go for a new one where you get a warranty.

It might “light up” properly on a short test, but you won’t know until it’s all installed and trying to cook that it’s not heating properly or something
 
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pkhodgson

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Depending on price for second hand, I’d go for a new one where you get a warranty.

It might “light up” properly on a short test, but you won’t know until it’s all installed and trying to cook that it’s not heating properly or something
Yes, that's a good point. It's a good price (£200 vs £599 in Wickes), and as I mentioned 'unused'.

Excuse the pun, I am cooling off on it a little, as it turns out it is not truly 'unused', having already been installed in an unoccupied new-build property. Whether it still has all of it's original fixings and instructions is still to be determined
 
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brianmoooore

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I had a similar but even better bargain a couple of years ago.
Many years ago I used to repair TVs, VCRs and other electrical stuff as a sideline, and occasionally still get asked to look at the odd appliance or two.
About two years ago I came home and found a hob in its original packaging left in my porch. No note or anything attached, so I waited for a 'phone call, which never came.
After a few days, curiosity got the better of me, so I took it out and inspected it. It had clearly been installed and removed, but otherwise was completely as new, with all paperwork and bits present. I stuck a 13A plug on a bit of flex onto it, and tried it out.
Nothing! Googled the part number, and realised it was an induction hob, with a price tag of about £600.
Powered it up again, this time with an induction hob friendly pan on it, and found it was in full working order.
I did contact a customer of mine that I knew had just fitted a new kitchen a couple of weeks later, but they denied all knowledge, so it's still here two years later.
I'm renovating a farmhouse at the moment, so it may end up in there next year.
 
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I also got given a free £600 induction hob a few years ago, it was installed at a customers premises (not by me), but had a small scratch on top, so the customer got a replacement, and had to dispose of the old one. Other than the not very noticeable scratch, it was as new, and is now in service for the last year.
 
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Mikegh

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Yes, that's a good point. It's a good price (£200 vs £599 in Wickes), and as I mentioned 'unused'.

Excuse the pun, I am cooling off on it a little, as it turns out it is not truly 'unused', having already been installed in an unoccupied new-build property. Whether it still has all of it's original fixings and instructions is still to be determined
Fixings and instructions I wouldn't be worrying about

Would be worth an inspection to check condition and maybe the 13A test as described above
 
telectrix

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not a hob, but an american style fridge/freezer, LG. adverised as free to collect, we' got a new one. van emptied, collected. perfect working order. almost like new. now in our house. compliments the Ariston double oven where guy wanted a scrapman to take away. just need to see what to do with the wall cabinets that had to be ripped out to make room.
 
pirate

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Kitchen appliances are a nightmare. However, I always insure mine. A few years ago my "American" style fridge/freezer failed. A Siemens one which cost about £1400. The "engineer" who called to check it looked on his laptop, couldn't find the required spare part in UK or Germany, but did find it in the USA. However, as the projected delivery time from there was more than 10 days he declared it scrap, gave me a catalogue to choose a new one from, so i chose a Samsung one and it was delivered 2 days later, and the old one was taken away, Whether it went straight to landfill or was stored for repair i do not know.
A dryer stopped working, so I contacted the insurers to discover it was on a recall for faulty heating element that could cause a fire. My problem was not the heater, just a faulty switch. The "engineer" came, simply took a picture of the Serial Number, and emailed a request for a new one which arrived the next day. He also took the top off to show me the heating element...I will NEVER leave a dryer on unattended!
My fancy Siemens combi-microwave suffered an accidental damage problem when I took a casserole dish out and snapped off the plastic catch that holds the door closed and allows the switch to operate. The insurers sent a chap who simply handed me a catalogue to choose a new one. I chose the nearest similar model at £800 and it was duly delivered a couple of days later. Incredible that a small piece of plastic being broken resulted in a completely new unit.
I'm not a fan of insurance companies generally, but I've had great results on kitchen appliances!
 

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