Discuss A different business model for PAT testing? in the Electrical Testing & PAT Testing Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Risteard

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In my opinion, by referring to it as "In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment" is not only a mouthful, but also unlikely to get you any work. Everyone refers to it as PAT Testing or Portable Appliance Testing, and the reality is that is what they are going to seek and ask for.
 
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  • #32
In my opinion, by referring to it as "In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment" is not only a mouthful, but also unlikely to get you any work. Everyone refers to it as PAT Testing or Portable Appliance Testing, and the reality is that is what they are going to seek and ask for.
Thanks. My intention is to word it as something like "Electrical Appliance Inspection & Testing", then in the detail it would be called by its full name, ISITEE. I would also prominently include the words: commonly known as "PAT Testing".

I see it as adding a premium. I'm tailoring my communication to the more considered client who wants a reasonably thorough service.
 

Pete999

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In my opinion, by referring to it as "In-service Inspection and Testing of Electrical Equipment" is not only a mouthful, but also unlikely to get you any work. Everyone refers to it as PAT Testing or Portable Appliance Testing, and the reality is that is what they are going to seek and ask for.
I respect your opinion Risteard, but with a caveat, by making the name of the operation more pronounced, may make people with the responsibility for these testing procedure sit up and take more notice, you must be aware of the no need effect many people treat the PATesting, waste of time and all that, highlighting it with a new name will in my opinion highlight the need for such testing what ever it is called, duty holders on todays industry NEED to be made aware of the importance of ISITEE, far to many duty holders treat the old PAT regime with indifference by calling it what is should it may raise the importance of testing to ISITEE, in my opinion.
 
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  • #34
I respect your opinion Risteard, but with a caveat, by making the name of the operation more pronounced, may make people with the responsibility for these testing procedure sit up and take more notice, you must be aware of the no need effect many people treat the PATesting, waste of time and all that, highlighting it with a new name will in my opinion highlight the need for such testing what ever it is called, duty holders on todays industry NEED to be made aware of the importance of ISITEE, far to many duty holders treat the old PAT regime with indifference by calling it what is should it may raise the importance of testing to ISITEE, in my opinion.
Very well said.
 
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  • #36
FAT is part of PAT...more a subset than an element...all part of ISITEE. All I was saying is that you need to be able to do simple testing of appliances that are not actually plugged in. You don't need a course on it, you need simple equipment that costs a few pounds. The principles are the same, just a wee bit of tweaking to do the tests, and an understanding of safe isolation.
Anyway, the tests are a tiny bit, the FVI much more. Going that extra step means you have tested all you can.
If you know how to test portable appliances, then you can do the odd fixed one...or stationary one...just do them all and give the customer his paperwork.
It's all about doing the job...
I have a few questions. Forgive me if these seem naive, but I lack practical experience:

1. I assume when carrying out FAIT I am not just isolating at the FCU, even if switched? My understanding is that even if it is a BS 1363-4 compliant double-pole switched FCU, simply switching it to 'OFF' would not be a sufficiently-safe isolation for the purposes of FAIT, you have to go to the CCU/DB and isolate/lock-off the MCBO or the whole mains. Obviously if it's an unswitched FCU or there are other doubts, then the situation is more obvious.

2. If this is correct, then my next issue is that wouldn't most commercial/business premises, especially rented offices, have a shared CCU/DB under the control of the landlord? From a marketing point-of-view, it would be useless trying to sell the machine-testing side of FAIT to most commercial clients if they rent their premises. I'd have to make them aware of FAIT, carry out the FVI and make recommendations for follow-up ISITEE for fixed appliances based on the CoP, but to actually carry out the machine tests would involve approaching commercial landlords. Thus, it looks like a two-handed market and quite complicated, and this may explain why a lot of these "PAT testing" companies don't bother with FAIT.

3. Another query I have is about the method of testing. When carrying out FAIT, could point-to-point testing damage the customer's electrics, maybe by tripping the RCD? Based on what I've been reading (so far), I'm inclined to the view that the plug/adaptor method is best and point-to-point should be avoided, where possible.

4. Finally, I've been looking at some of the mains-powered testers, such as the Martindale EPAT2100. That model doesn't appear to have any sockets for point-to-point testing and there's nothing mentioned about it in the manual. Are there adaptors that can be purchased for this sort of model that will help with FAIT when wires cannot be re-terminated and point-to-point is necessary?
 
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  • #37
Hello,

Does anybody have a reply to my comment above, please?

I hope everybody otherwise had an enjoyable break over Xmas and the New Year.
 

pirate

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Arms
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I use a terminal block and Wagos to test fixed appliances which are wired to FCUs. Basically all you are doing is "plugging in" the cable of the heater or whatever to a 13A plug which is then plugged into your tester. Obviously, you must isolate the FCU circuit first, and then it is just as if you are plugging the appliance in as usual.
This is a fairly common one, and used widely:


A long lead and Wagos on the end, works ok.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #39
I use a terminal block and Wagos to test fixed appliances which are wired to FCUs. Basically all you are doing is "plugging in" the cable of the heater or whatever to a 13A plug which is then plugged into your tester. Obviously, you must isolate the FCU circuit first, and then it is just as if you are plugging the appliance in as usual.
This is a fairly common one, and used widely:


A long lead and Wagos on the end, works ok.
Thanks for the information.
 

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