Discuss EICR Change of occupancy in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

Pretty Mouth

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I've just read the EICR Codebreakers, Part 3 - Frequency of Next Inspection is a good read. NAPIT are suggesting the electrician should suggest a frequency, but it is the responsible persons who is responsible to assessing the safety, and therefore the frequency.
So if the landlord say's I want 5 years, you can advise against, and give your reasons, but it's his call.
So I've just done a complete U-Turn........
Thank god for codebreakers hey, we would never have worked this out without it
 
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It is entirly up to the electrician issuing the cert as to how long or whether new occupancy or not. It is not the landlords decision to make.
 

snowhead

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New Occupancy / new tennacy could be 1 month or 20 years or more.
It's only mention in the Private Rented Sector legislation is in relation to testing prior to April 2021 which has now passed.

(2) For the purposes of sub-paragraph (1)(b) “at regular intervals” means—

(a) at intervals of no more than 5 years; or

(b)
where the most recent report under sub-paragraph (3)(a) requires such inspection and testing to be at intervals of less than 5 years, at the intervals specified in that report.

New Occupancy / new tennacy is not an interval.
I doubt it can be found anywhere in the regs or in any guidance on EICR as an interval for testing.

If I was a Landlord requesting a EICR, I'd make it clear at the time of request that I would not accept New Occupancy / New tennacy as a next test due date.

If I was presented with an EICR stating New Occupancy / new tennacy and the tester would not change it, I'd be very confident that no Local Authority or any other entity would be stupid enough to attempt procecution over failing to comply with the legislation within 5 years of that test.

If however the tester wanted to put a time period less than 5 years, then they would also have to state reason(s) why.
 

Mike Johnson

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I agree, it could definitely be a problem for a landlord if the tenants change often. Not sure the best way round it really. A full EICR every time would work out expensive.
The problem, as we know, tenants fiddle with the electrics, if this is not checked on the change of tenancy the landlord will be liable if an accident happens to the new tenant due to a modification by the previous tenant.
 
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if an old tennant has changed some switch fronts or plug sockets... and not done a good job of it, then surely as a landlord you would at least perform a visual check, but preferably get someone in to check any work the tennant was not allowed to do. Hence the reason for change of tenancy, rather than rent it out with dodgy switches which the letting agent may know nothing about.
 

Mike Johnson

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I was thinking of more serious changes i.e. putting in an external socket without RCD protection and the new tenant is electrocuted whilst cutting the lawn, or putting in an electric shower etc:
 

GBDamo

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I was thinking of more serious changes i.e. putting in an external socket without RCD protection and the new tenant is electrocuted whilst cutting the lawn, or putting in an electric shower etc:

Exactly, and let's not forget landlords are running a commercial enterprise offering a product that must be safe. Despite how they often kid themselves they're accidental or amature if your you're taken money for something then you have a duty of care and most importantly have to be able to demonstrate how they have discharged their duty.

if an old tennant has changed some switch fronts or plug sockets... and not done a good job of it, then surely as a landlord you would at least perform a visual check, but preferably get someone in to check any work the tennant was not allowed to do. Hence the reason for change of tenancy, rather than rent it out with dodgy switches which the letting agent may know nothing about.

I was thinking of a tamper seal process where an electrician can apply tamper seals above patress screws, across DBs etc..

If the seals are in place then a cursory once over on change of tannancy and a full EICR every 5 yrs.

If the seals are broken on change of tenancy then the tennant is liable for a full EICR.

Might work?
 

DPG

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The problem, as we know, tenants fiddle with the electrics, if this is not checked on the change of tenancy the landlord will be liable if an accident happens to the new tenant due to a modification by the previous tenant.

Agree, this can happen. And a visual check should be done on change of tennancy.
 

suffolkspark

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I have 1 landlord that gets me to check on change of tennant, but i also work for several landlords that don't get the places eicrd at all. Seems the ones that don't have agents didn't get the memo!
 
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This is a good article, clears up any discrepancies on ‘change of occupancy’

Let’s hope it appears in Amendment 2, although I doubt it…….And this assumes the IET agree. Surly the IET should get the final say
 

Pretty Mouth

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This is a good article, clears up any discrepancies on ‘change of occupancy’

Let’s hope it appears in Amendment 2, although I doubt it…….And this assumes the IET agree. Surly the IET should get the final sa
Good article, but you're over thinking this. If the IET disagreed, then it would be regulation.

BS7671 652 Frequency of periodic inspection and testing, basically tells us to use our judgement. No more than that. The legislation tells us maximum 5 years. That is all you need to know.
 

i=p/u

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I agree, it could definitely be a problem for a landlord if the tenants change often. Not sure the best way round it really. A full EICR every time would work out expensive.
Not if he had maintanece regime in place.. all social housing is tested if thers a change of tenancy, but it's a two hour safety check.. think key here is use same electrician with a record of checks being done.. why wouldn't ya want spark to check over if new tenants coming in.
 

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