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Discuss Recommendations for a decent torque wrench in the Electrical Tools and Products area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi guys,

Hope you're all well!!

Due to a recent influx of commercial/light industrial work which has just come in, I am in the market for a decent torque wrench which will be suitable for the majority of single and three phase distribution boards.

I think a suitable torque range would be between 10-50Nm although I'm happy to be corrected on this.

Looking at the Wera website is making my head spin with the many many different combinations so I'm looking for some advice from experienced users.

Thanks guys.

Mike.

(Edit: following image added by Dan to test Featured Threads system, it may not be anything like the wrench you're talking about - sorry if that's the case I'll update the image at a later date)

Recommendations for a decent torque wrench torque-wrench - EletriciansForums.net
 
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One consideration is the recalibration costs I know a few places where torque wrenches are used a lot they treat them as disposable items and replace them every 12 months rather than recalibrate so tend to go for a cheaper torque wrench
 
One consideration is the recalibration costs I know a few places where torque wrenches are used a lot they treat them as disposable items and replace them every 12 months rather than recalibrate so tend to go for a cheaper torque wrench
Actually, you're spot on with that. I didn't consider the lack of use and, as you've said, the calibration costs.

Fair play to you.

You should be my business financial advisor to prevent me from buying yet another expensive tool that hardly ever gets any use!! 😁
Looks like it's a trip to Halfords then.........

Thanks guys...👍
 
Actually, you're spot on with that. I didn't consider the lack of use and, as you've said, the calibration costs.

Fair play to you.

You should be my business financial advisor to prevent me from buying yet another expensive tool that hardly ever gets any use!! 😁
Looks like it's a trip to Halfords then.........

Thanks guys...👍
Every tool has a value I bought an Aldi £40 multi tool before spending out on one costing 3 times or more mainly to gauge how much use it would get it got battered and I bought a Dewalt multi tool

When it comes to capital expense you have to be quite pragmatic and look at the pro's and con's will the cheap one do or is the expensive one more cost effective and there is always the do I really need it or is there an alternative way or tool to complete the task
 
Sausages (just for tracking a min lol needed a word, I must be hungry)
It's a judgement call for sure

Some tools or equipment will get a bit of abuse , or are only needed for simple troubleshooting

I usually completely avoid the bargain basement stuff that tends to be unusable

Buy mid range or high end depending on the circumstances
 
I am in the market for a decent torque wrench which will be suitable for the majority of single and three phase distribution boards.

I think a suitable torque range would be between 10-50Nm although I'm happy to be corrected on this.
If you are talking about 125A-ish TPN boards then figures of 1-5Nm are far more likely!

Most MCB/RCBO are in the 2-3.5Nm range, some terminals around 1.5Nm, some bolted joints of the M6/M8 size in the 3-5Nm for smaller electrical stuff. You will struggle to get one tool that really covers the whole lot.

I got a a Wera set, think it was this one, covering 1.2-3Nm which does most of the usual screw terminals and is VDE insulated:


I also have a 1/4" drive one that goes higher but it is a non-insulated mechanical style which is fine for some jobs, but as a general tool for working near live equipment it makes me a bit nervous! And yes, I do safe isolation, but everyone makes a mistake once.

VDE insulation might allow you to make it twice!
 
This is the 1/4" drive one:

Also I have some bigger ones from my car hobby days, both 3/8" and 1/2" drive.
 
While all the guidance says to calibrate each year, for myself I am a bit more pragmatic in that you do feel the force and get an idea if the tool is working tolerably well. If you care for the tool, so leave it set to minimum torque in storage so the spring is not weakened too fast, and don't use it as a tool for loosening over-tightened stuff, they seem to maintain good behaviour.

Also remember that while torque wrenches often claim something like 3% accuracy, the surface finish and lubrication state of the items being screwed can have a 20% or greater impact on the preload (i.e. compressive forces).
 
While all the guidance says to calibrate each year, for myself I am a bit more pragmatic in that you do feel the force and get an idea if the tool is working tolerably well. If you care for the tool, so leave it set to minimum torque in storage so the spring is not weakened too fast, and don't use it as a tool for loosening over-tightened stuff, they seem to maintain good behaviour.
The problem is if something has to proved or is subject to audit then no matter how it is kept or previously used the calibration cert trumps everything these days
Also remember that while torque wrenches often claim something like 3% accuracy, the surface finish and lubrication state of the items being screwed can have a 20% or greater impact on the preload (i.e. compressive forces).
And this is the big problem at such low torque values
 
Sausages (just for tracking a min lol needed a word, I must be hungry)
That torque range is way outside the norm for terminal screws for domestic use, usually from 1Nm : 6Nm, your requirements for light industrial/commercial use may be required to ask one of the manufacturers, Wiha, Wera and Armeg come to mind.
 

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