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Discuss What do I need to know to calculate size of single phase motor? in the Electrical Engineering Chat area at ElectriciansForums.net

pgrbff

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DIY
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About 20 years ago I bought an old table saw from a local school. I only had single phase at the time so I changed the motor and switchgear as it was 450V. I'm thinking of buying a 3 phase 50s bandsaw and have the same problem, but I can't remember how to work out the size of the replacement single phase motor. Are there likely to be any other problems?
 

Andy-1960

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Esteemed
Arms
I would have thought the easiest way round the issue is to match the new motor to the one you take off. I.E the same h.p / kw rating and the same speed as the three phase one you take off
 

pc1966

Esteemed
Arms
Supporter
Interesting idea, I guess these days a VFD is probably cheaper than a new motor? Also you probably get soft-start and the speed control might prove useful.
 
This is all the info I have.
Can't read that, but how old is the motor? A VFD will put a lot more stress on the motor windings and an old motor with old insulation will not like it.

Note also that a VFD running from a single phase supply provides 230VAC 3 phase not 415, at 50Hz. Which is fine if your motor is wound and can be connected accordingly.

Edit...can read it now....you can connect in delta 250V so the VFD voltage level should work. I would be concerned about the winding insulation with VFD operation.
 

pgrbff

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DIY
Can't read that, but how old is the motor? A VFD will put a lot more stress on the motor windings and an old motor with old insulation will not like it.

Note also that a VFD running from a single phase supply provides 230VAC 3 phase not 415, at 50Hz. Which is fine if your motor is wound and can be connected accordingly.

Edit...can read it now....you can connect in delta 250V so the VFD voltage level should work. I would be concerned about the winding insulation with VFD operation.From what I'm told the machine is 50s or 60's.
From what I have been told the machine could be 50's or 60's. Is it possible to estimate the HP or KW from the info on that plate?
 

Julie.

Esteemed
Arms
It's around 1.5HP - if you are using the 260V line the "power" it will consume is around 260 x 5 x 1.73 = 2.25kW (not quite right it's actually VA, but let's keep it simple),

However not all this power is converted to output, so it is normal to take around 60% of this on newer motors and 50-55% on older motors (the "loss" is efficiency and power factor) - giving an output around 1.125kW (then divide by 0.746 to convert to hp) = 1.5HP

Difficulty to actually say as a more efficient motor could give up to 1.8hp output, one less down to 1hp.

This motor could be wired in delta for a 260V voltage, that should be ok for a VFD at 230V from a 230v single phase supply.

Try somewhere like Newton Tesla | Mitsubishi Electric Products, Motors & Gearboxes (newton-tesla.co.uk) if you speak to them they would advise if the motor is suitable.
 

pgrbff

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DIY
It's around 1.5HP - if you are using the 260V line the "power" it will consume is around 260 x 5 x 1.73 = 2.25kW (not quite right it's actually VA, but let's keep it simple),

However not all this power is converted to output, so it is normal to take around 60% of this on newer motors and 50-55% on older motors (the "loss" is efficiency and power factor) - giving an output around 1.125kW (then divide by 0.746 to convert to hp) = 1.5HP

Difficulty to actually say as a more efficient motor could give up to 1.8hp output, one less down to 1hp.

This motor could be wired in delta for a 260V voltage, that should be ok for a VFD at 230V from a 230v single phase supply.

Try somewhere like Newton Tesla | Mitsubishi Electric Products, Motors & Gearboxes (newton-tesla.co.uk) if you speak to them they would advise if the motor is suitable.
Now I know why I got a E in A level physics. Thank you.
 

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