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L

leekemp85

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I have been asked to change a mains board in a small office as there are no spare way.(the building was tested a few weeks ago and I have been asked to do the work that failed.)

Am a qualified electrician registered as a sole trader but not yet in the part p scheme am I legally aloud to do this.

And if changing an mains board will everything need to be on rcbos or just the new circuits the other electrician put a code 2 that circuits were not on rcd (I thought this would be a code 4 as you can change every circuit to rcd just because of new regs)

many thanks
 
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A

acat

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
If you are part P only you cannot do the job as this is for domestic only or domestic and business where they share the same single phase meter.



Chris
 
L

leekemp85

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
This is a small office in town its not domestic. but i still don't know if i am aloud to do it its going to be about 8 weeks until the nic can assess me. but the job need doing sooner than that.
 
G

Guest123

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Your office environment does not fall under Part P of the building regs, therefore there is no need to notify to BC so yes you can go ahead and do the work. Providing that the customer hasn't asked for an NIC/ECA/NAPIT etc cert. If not then you can just use a generic test form like NICEIC green ones for the testing of all the work you carry out. This will also look good to your inspector as he will see you are testing jobs ad issueing the appropriate test forms.

If you upgrade the DB then you assume resposibility for all the outgoing circuits from that DB and as your work must now comply with the 17th then you may need to fit RCD protection to the circuits that didn't have it before depnding on istallation method and type of circuit etc.

Dont forget to check earthing and bonding systems before you do anything.

Hope this helps.
 
I think what acat means is that if the business was within a domestic property or, visa versa, then you should think about Part P registration. Part P applies to domestic installations only, what you should possess (to show competency for 1) are C&G 2391 & 2382 . I don't believe that it is a requirement for you to be a member of an orginisation such as nic for you to undertake installation work in an industrial enviroment, but be aware that you can (& will) be prosecuted :mad: should you undertake sub-standard work.

Regards Gaz.
 

andyb

-
Arms
Esteemed
If this is commercial it is not notifiable and does not come under part p.

Legally, my granny could do it, so as long as you are qualified and confident, just do it.

Do your tests and complete your own certificate.

Good luck.
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Chaps, not wanting to disagree with anyone (especially Leonard) but, when performing a cu change ONLY, you do not automatically become responsible for the circuits connected to it, providing everything is marked as such.

Yes, a full set of results is required to ensure everything complies with the new CPD's that are installed.

The certificate and periodic test label MUST be noted "CU CHANGE ONLY".

Jobs a goodun.:D
 
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As an industrial electrician I do not need nor do I have part P certification, but I can do work in the domestic area.
All that you need are the qualification you gained as an apprentice and the latest IEE Regs certificate now at the 17th.
Contact your council buildings dept, and in form them of the work, they generaly ask for copys of your qualification and your test results, the forms for which you can down load from the IEE now called IET at www.------.org or photo copy them from the back of the 17th edition IEE wiring regulations.
 
G

Guest123

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Hey.

Sorry chaps didn't get me point accross very well in the previous post:eek:.

What I was getting at was the issue regarding RCD protection for all circuits as the OP didn't seem sure. As we all know according to the 16th only sockets likely to supply equipment outdoors required RCD protection but with the 17th near enough all circuits need it and if you upgrade a DB then obviously you are working to the 17th so the circuits that were not RCD protected before now probably will need it.

:)
 
As an industrial electrician I do not need nor do I have part P certification, but I can do work in the domestic area.
All that you need are the qualification you gained as an apprentice and the latest IEE Regs certificate now at the 17th.
Contact your council buildings dept, and in form them of the work, they generaly ask for copys of your qualification and your test results, the forms for which you can down load from the IEE now called IET at www.------.org or photo copy them from the back of the 17th edition IEE wiring regulations.
expensive way of doing it though with most councils charging upward of £150+vat per job :eek:
 
What charge?
With my council Building dept, my qualifications are enough for them to accept that the work has been done to the standard set out in the 17th edition IEE Regs and I am therefore qualified to certify my own work.
As in my job where I certify for the design, construction, inspection and testing of all my work.
They do make a charge, how ever for the inspection and testing of work carried out by unqualified persons.
 

sparks1234

-
Arms
Hey.

Sorry chaps didn't get me point accross very well in the previous post:eek:.

What I was getting at was the issue regarding RCD protection for all circuits as the OP didn't seem sure. As we all know according to the 16th only sockets likely to supply equipment outdoors required RCD protection but with the 17th near enough all circuits need it and if you upgrade a DB then obviously you are working to the 17th so the circuits that were not RCD protected before now probably will need it.

:)
Not according to the ECA lenny, they say that this is a controlled enviroment i.e. ordinary people should not be installaing pinboards etc etc, they also say thay sockets flushed in walls are the same , i.e. no RCD required, I was surprised but I did bring the point up about tea point areas with water about and the cleaner where henry has a long lead, they agreed that RCD was a good practice in these areas. They even went as far as highly recommending that RCD's are not installed in the normal commercial office enviroment.

What charge?
With my council Building dept, my qualifications are enough for them to accept that the work has been done to the standard set out in the 17th edition IEE Regs and I am therefore qualified to certify my own work.
As in my job where I certify for the design, construction, inspection and testing of all my work.
They do make a charge, how ever for the inspection and testing of work carried out by unqualified persons.
If you are talking about domestic works then you should either be Part P qualified or have your works signed off by the council, if you should be doing your electrical outside these boundaries there is only one person it comes back to and I guess you know what the very expensive consequences are.
 
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What charge?
With my council Building dept, my qualifications are enough for them to accept that the work has been done to the standard set out in the 17th edition IEE Regs and I am therefore qualified to certify my own work.
As in my job where I certify for the design, construction, inspection and testing of all my work.
They do make a charge, how ever for the inspection and testing of work carried out by unqualified persons.
i would suggest you have a chat with your local council :eek:
it doesnt matter how qualified you are notifiable work is notifiable work whoever does it.
i too am fully qualified 2391, 17th blah blah but still have to pay the £425 each year to niceic to operate within the law :eek:
 
G

Guest123

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Apologies once again, there is another thread along the same lines somewhere and that was a domestic situation, got confused bewtween the two.

You are of course correct in what you say with it being a commercial installation.

Taxi for Lenny.:eek:
 

andyb

-
Arms
Esteemed
Not according to the ECA lenny, they say that this is a controlled enviroment i.e. ordinary people should not be installaing pinboards etc etc, they also say thay sockets flushed in walls are the same , i.e. no RCD required, I was surprised but I did bring the point up about tea point areas with water about and the cleaner where henry has a long lead, they agreed that RCD was a good practice in these areas. They even went as far as highly recommending that RCD's are not installed in the normal commercial office enviroment.



If you are talking about domestic works then you should either be Part P qualified or have your works signed off by the council, if you should be doing your electrical outside these boundaries there is only one person it comes back to and I guess you know what the very expensive consequences are.
The regs do not differentiate between domestic & industrial.
If a cable is buried less than 50mm without earthed protection or etc or etc, then rcd protection is needed.
 
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