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Hi already introduced myself to the forum. I am a gas engineer just called over from the plumbing forum for a bit of advice.I have no electrical qualifications but would like to eventually be qualified to wire in electric showers, dual fuel cookers etc, all domestic. Just looking for a bit of advice on the best route to take thanks in advance.
 
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Plonker 3

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A 3 year apprenticeship doing the City and Guilds course is the best way to becoming a qualified sparks, or you could part with thousands of pounds of your hard earned cash and do what is known as a 5 Week Wonder course, although that actually gives you no experience at all, but will get you qualified to join a Part P scam.
 
He only wants to wire in showers etc and carry on being a plumber not a fully qualified electrician
 
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Deleted member 9648

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  • #4
Hi already introduced myself to the forum. I am a gas engineer just called over from the plumbing forum for a bit of advice.I have no electrical qualifications but would like to eventually be qualified to wire in electric showers, dual fuel cookers etc, all domestic. Just looking for a bit of advice on the best route to take thanks in advance.
You cant learn to wire showers etc in a classroom....there are just too many onsite variables which an electrician will pick up and a 'classroom spark' wont.
Work with an electrician in conjunction with a course if you really want to go down this route,a mini apprenticeship if you like,there's no reason you cant become competant for what you need in this way. Failing that stick to what you know.......otherwise you will just be another 'plumber' who thinks he knows what he is doing and making a balls of it.
 
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Plonker 3

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  • #5
He only wants to wire in showers etc and carry on being a plumber not a fully qualified electrician

So which course does teach him how to wire a shower up?
 
So which course does teach him how to wire a shower up?

Read more: http://www.electriciansforums.net/e...60188-course-advice-please.html#ixzz20DiGCeD5
That's what he's asking!!
 

telectrix

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my advice is stick to what you knw. sub out electrical work to a spark, and in return he'll sub out plumbing and gas to you. each to his own, everyone scores.
 

Marvo

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Hi Breakdown, good luck with widening your skill-set.

Ive moved this to the training courses forum for you.
 
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Dave 85

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  • #9
Hi already introduced myself to the forum. I am a gas engineer just called over from the plumbing forum for a bit of advice.I have no electrical qualifications but would like to eventually be qualified to wire in electric showers, dual fuel cookers etc, all domestic. Just looking for a bit of advice on the best route to take thanks in advance.
You can do a domestic installer course and the 17th edition regs course in 5 weeks. Once you've done this you need to buy test equipment and you can apply to join a part p competent persons scheme, which will require you to have an annual assessment for £400 a year.

Alternatively you could give up your (probably substantial) earnings for the next 4 years, lose all your clients, have your house repo'd and let your kids starve so you can do a proper apprenticeship and be able to enjoy the smug feeling of knowing you did it 'properly' when you wire up the odd power shower or put in a boiler spur.

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Hi already introduced myself to the forum. I am a gas engineer just called over from the plumbing forum for a bit of advice.I have no electrical qualifications but would like to eventually be qualified to wire in electric showers, dual fuel cookers etc, all domestic. Just looking for a bit of advice on the best route to take thanks in advance.
You can do a domestic installer course and the 17th edition regs course in 5 weeks. Once you've done this you need to buy test equipment and you can apply to join a part p competent persons scheme, which will require you to have an annual assessment for £400 a year.

Alternatively you could give up your (probably substantial) earnings for the next 4 years, lose all your clients, have your house repo'd and let your kids starve so you can do a proper apprenticeship and be able to enjoy the smug feeling of knowing you did it 'properly' when you wire up the odd power shower or put in a boiler spur.
 
B

breakdown

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  • #11
Thanks for all your answers.maybe telectrix has the best idea. Take it the 5 week course is not a big hit with you all, same with the gas.
 
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Daft spark

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  • #12
Telectrix is right,best advice is to stick to what you know and esp stay clear of electrics in wet locations for obvious reasons.If you want to save a bit of cash you could possibly run the cable in and leave it ready for connection by a qualified spark.You would have to be doing showers every day to re comm-pence for 5 wks off to do a course and pay for test equipment,tools etc.Gas should only be touched by qualified plumbers and eletrickery only by qualified electricians.5 wks training will make you neither.
 
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Dave 85

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Thanks for all your answers.maybe telectrix has the best idea. Take it the 5 week course is not a big hit with you all, same with the gas.
Yeah to be honest, if you wanna abide by the rules, and you only wanna do little bits of electrical work, it really isn't worth the time and money to do it yourself. You're looking at thousands of pounds outlay.
Of course there is no law that says you cant do electrical work anyway, you just have to do it properly and notify to LABC any new circuits or kitchen bathroom work.
 

telectrix

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cost wise, the course will cost a few grand. test gear £700 ( plus annual calibration £70 ). then scam membership around £500/year. not to mention all the time testing and filling in the paperwork.
 
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