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Hi lads. Just wanted to talk about working away. Today we have been asked how we feel about it. Where I work don’t really work away and I haven’t had to yet. But up until I joined 2 years ago I spent 17 years on and off, on more than off away from home. It has been suggested that we may be layed off if it gets to a point where the local work drys up. But after April next year the squedule is full of local work again, so I’m led to believe. I have kids and a mrs. I’ve got to a point where I don’t want that life anymore and I’m just not interested in it. I’ve had health issues, and one of my kids also has health issues. I need to be home really. Do I have to go if I’m in the books? What are your experiences with similar situations?
 
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ashrow

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Some companies have in place in their contract (if you signed one) where your are/distance expected to work
If you have no contract get some expert advice.
If your employed the rules may be different then if self employed
 

Pete999

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Hi John
From someone who has worked away from home a lot including overseas which was part of the equation.
I would humbly suggest, that if you have a contract of employment that requires you to work away from home, which no longer suits your personal conditions, but is the only work your company can provide for you, then to be blunt you need to weight the pros and cons equally, it maybe that they could lay you off due to lack of work opportunities, depends on what your contract pf employment says.
I had a young family and went away for a year no leave hard but it paid the bills, it could be that you need to speak to your other half and discuss the pros and cons of working away, I guess it's down to you and your family to weigh up what the important issues are mine and my families at the time was money, to provide safe housing, it made us stronger although I am having some problems with my pension at the moment, talk it over with Her in Doors see what She wants out of life, I she need to speak to someone who has been there done that and got the T shirt many times over, phone number on request, good luck
 

buzzlightyear

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a company can not make you work away ,you must tell you boss it is no good for you and tell them about you child with health problems they might see it your way .its not like years ago ,a bang on the head and next thing your on a ship going out of port .
 

Pete999

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a company can not make you work away ,you must tell you boss it is no good for you and tell them about you child with health problems they might see it your way .its not like years ago ,a bang on the head and next thing your on a ship going out of port .
All very well Buzz, depends on what the poster signed up for, if the only work is away from home, then not much choice is there, travel or the Spanish Archer (elbow) sad but it's understandable, can't keep paying someone who wont go where the work is, like I said depend on what was signed up for,
 

rapparee

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a company can not make you work away ,you must tell you boss it is no good for you and tell them about you child with health problems they might see it your way .its not like years ago ,a bang on the head and next thing your on a ship going out of port .
So they lay him off then, no hard feelings and we'll see you in April.

What's two years redundancy worth.

If there's no work locally what do you expect the firm to do? They're taking on this extra work as a stop gap to keep the boys in work. I've seen it happen lots of times.
 

Baddegg

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If you are on the cards you’ll have a contract even it not written it’ll be assumed, sorry to say but it sounds like you already know the answer mate, especially as they are offering you work.....best of luck to you though it’s not a nice situation to be in especially this time of year
 

rapparee

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your heath and the child's ,I would agree with you ,but if the op not happy then its down to him not his boss .
Absolutely everyone has their own priorities, but it's not fair to blame the firm.

I've known guys who have taken jobs at practically cost price over in England when the work has dried up here in Ireland. Just so they could keep their squad of men in work. This wasn't a good thing either, if there is no meat in the profits it's very easy to be making a loss if anything goes wrong.

Some fellas went to England others stayed at home, they were reemployed when the squad came back to Ireland.
 
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Hi John
From someone who has worked away from home a lot including overseas which was part of the equation.
I would humbly suggest, that if you have a contract of employment that requires you to work away from home, which no longer suits your personal conditions, but is the only work your company can provide for you, then to be blunt you need to weight the pros and cons equally, it maybe that they could lay you off due to lack of work opportunities, depends on what your contract pf employment says.
I had a young family and went away for a year no leave hard but it paid the bills, it could be that you need to speak to your other half and discuss the pros and cons of working away, I guess it's down to you and your family to weigh up what the important issues are mine and my families at the time was money, to provide safe housing, it made us stronger although I am having some problems with my pension at the moment, talk it over with Her in Doors see what She wants out of life, I she need to speak to someone who has been there done that and got the T shirt many times over, phone number on request, good luck
I’ve just check my contract and all it says is ( if asked to work out of town that the room and breakfast And expenses are payed for by the company ) it doesn’t mention having to go. It says if asked. Not you will be expected to go
 

buzzlightyear

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A contract of employment can be altered only with the agreement of both parties. When any change to a contract of employment is actioned, employers are required to give written notification of the variations within a month of the changes being agreed and put in place. i sometimes work part time in litigation in suits ,lol.
 
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Pete999

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Absolutely everyone has their own priorities, but it's not fair to blame the firm.

I've known guys who have taken jobs at practically cost price over in England when the work has dried up here in Ireland. Just so they could keep their squad of men in work. This wasn't a good thing either, if there is no meat in the profits it's very easy to be making a loss if anything goes wrong.

Some fellas went to England others stayed at home, they were reemployed when the squad came back to Ireland.
If "The firm" specialises in working away from home and you understand the situation, then you can't sudden;y decide you don't like the situation, and that 'sall that's available,what do you expect "the firm" to do? shell out a salary or wage for nil input? come on Mate live in the real world.
 
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So they lay him off then, no hard feelings and we'll see you in April.

What's two years redundancy worth.

If there's no work locally what do you expect the firm to do? They're taking on this extra work as a stop gap to keep the boys in work. I've seen it happen lots of times.
There is thow. They just implied that if it did ever dry up we could potentially be layed off. I would say this is to give us a gentle nudge to go away
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If "The firm" specialises in working away from home and you understand the situation, then you can't sudden;y decide you don't like the situation, and that 'sall that's available,what do you expect "the firm" to do? shell out a salary or wage for nil input? come on Mate live in the real world.
When I joined I was told working away was very few and far between. I’ve known one job that’s been away since being here. Like I said I did 12 months at a time in London getting the tube to the job. I’ve worked away for over 17 years on and off. I’ve done my time.
 

Pete999

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There is thow. They just implied that if it did ever dry up we could potentially be layed off. I would say this is to give us a gentle nudge to go away
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When I joined I was told working away was very few and far between. I’ve known one job that’s been away since being here. Like I said I did 12 months at a time in London getting the tube to the job. I’ve worked away for over 17 years on and off. I’ve done my time.
Seems to me that "working away" means different things to different people, grow some and get on with it!!
 
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Seems to me that "working away" means different things to different people, grow some and get on with it!!
Why should I be miserable thow and make my family miserable like I said. If 17 years of doing it isn’t enough then I don’t know what is.
 

Pete999

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Why should I be miserable thow and make my family miserable like I said. If 17 years of doing it isn’t enough then I don’t know what is.
What is your experience of working away then John? try and aI don't want to harp on wot/rking away in the near east for 12 months see how that compares
 
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What is your experience of working away then John? try and aI don't want to harp on wot/rking away in the near east for 12 months see how that compares
What is your experience of working away then John? try and aI don't want to harp on wot/rking away in the near east for 12 months see how that compares
whats this then. I’ve had a harder life than you contest? I’ve had it bad working overseas? I’ve asked a simple enough question. If you ain’t going to offer genuine advice then do one. I survived cancer 2 years ago. How’s that for a tough time
 

Pete999

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whats this then. I’ve had a harder life than you contest? I’ve had it bad working overseas? I’ve asked a simple enough question. If you ain’t going to offer genuine advice then do one. I survived cancer 2 years ago. How’s that for a tough time
"Some Old Boy" seems I hit a raw nerve Mate
 
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"Some Old Boy" seems I hit a raw nerve Mate
You hit a nerve by trying to make out like I haven’t worked hard and haven’t payed my dues. Like I said. After what’s happened to me I ain’t spending my time being miserable. So yeah telling me to grow a pair hit a nerve mate. Go through months of chemo and then get back to working full time afterwards. Then let’s see how big your balls are.
 

Baddegg

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In answer to your question @John Matrix yes it does sound like your employer could make you work away.,..,only you can decide if you want to do that.....me personally having grown up with my father always away working would never put my children through it, life is to short to be missing the people you care about,whatever the outcome I hope it all works out for ya mate
 

Pete999

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You hit a nerve by trying to make out like I haven’t worked hard and haven’t payed my dues.
Never meant to imply that Mate, if I did appologies
You hit a nerve by trying to make out like I haven’t worked hard and haven’t payed my dues.
It's just you seemed very vocal on the subject John with very little subject matter. if my post irked your mojo, like I said earlier appologies.
 

Megawatt

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Hi John
From someone who has worked away from home a lot including overseas which was part of the equation.
I would humbly suggest, that if you have a contract of employment that requires you to work away from home, which no longer suits your personal conditions, but is the only work your company can provide for you, then to be blunt you need to weight the pros and cons equally, it maybe that they could lay you off due to lack of work opportunities, depends on what your contract pf employment says.
I had a young family and went away for a year no leave hard but it paid the bills, it could be that you need to speak to your other half and discuss the pros and cons of working away, I guess it's down to you and your family to weigh up what the important issues are mine and my families at the time was money, to provide safe housing, it made us stronger although I am having some problems with my pension at the moment, talk it over with Her in Doors see what She wants out of life, I she need to speak to someone who has been there done that and got the T shirt many times over, phone number on request, good luck
John listen to what @Pete999 has to say this man has been there and done that. He’s worked in countries that we wouldn’t even want to go to. Good luck
Hi John
From someone who has worked away from home a lot including overseas which was part of the equation.
I would humbly suggest, that if you have a contract of employment that requires you to work away from home, which no longer suits your personal conditions, but is the only work your company can provide for you, then to be blunt you need to weight the pros and cons equally, it maybe that they could lay you off due to lack of work opportunities, depends on what your contract pf employment says.
I had a young family and went away for a year no leave hard but it paid the bills, it could be that you need to speak to your other half and discuss the pros and cons of working away, I guess it's down to you and your family to weigh up what the important issues are mine and my families at the time was money, to provide safe housing, it made us stronger although I am having some problems with my pension at the moment, talk it over with Her in Doors see what She wants out of life, I she need to speak to someone who has been there done that and got the T shirt many times over, phone number on request, good luck
whats this then. I’ve had a harder life than you contest? I’ve had it bad working overseas? I’ve asked a simple enough question. If you ain’t going to offer genuine advice then do one. I survived cancer 2 years ago. How’s that for a tough time
whats this then. I’ve had a harder life than you contest? I’ve had it bad working overseas? I’ve asked a simple enough question. If you ain’t going to offer genuine advice then do one. I survived cancer 2 years ago. How’s that for a tough time
John you ain’t the only one that has health problems on this forum. I think that this conversation needs to be ended. What’s said is what’s said so walk away
 

Baddegg

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John listen to what @Pete999 has to say this man has been there and done that. He’s worked in countries that we wouldn’t even want to go to. Good luck


John you ain’t the only one that has health problems on this forum. I think that this conversation needs to be ended. What’s said is what’s said so walk away
I can’t see how Pete having worked in rough countries has any bearing on wether this mans employer can make him work away?
This man has clearly come on hear for some advice and doesn’t deserve to be shouted down and insulted because he doesn’t measure up to some one else’s views on what constitutes as working away....
 
In my opinion it sounds like you really don't want to work away, (understandable) and if that's the case then don't.

You might end up going to work everyday with resentment and anger at your situation which doesn't benefit anyone.

Start saving money away now and get your CV in order just in case.
 

Pete999

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I can’t see how Pete having worked in rough countries has any bearing on wether this mans employer can make him work away?
This man has clearly come on hear for some advice and doesn’t deserve to be shouted down and insulted because he doesn’t measure up to some one else’s views on what constitutes as working away....
I think the crux of this issue is not whether I (Pete999) worked I "rough countries or whatever" the crux is I knew what I had signed up for, hence no recriminations on my employers, I knew to some degree "what I was letting myself in for, so did my wife" that's all nothing else end of. If explaining what and where I had been constitutes " shouting down " then I'm guilty, I believe that this is not the case, and disagree with your inference Badegg.
 

ipf

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So, if they've no work locally at present, do you expect them to pay you a wage if you won't work away?
You've got to go with the flow. Seems to me they're being fair for indicating home work in the near future, when available.
If you don't want the work, don't go. You could always ask them to keep you in hand for the future. Explain your situation to 'em.
 

ruston

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Sometimes the heart has to rule the head , and I think in your case you already know that.
I agree with the comments that this is a situation that has to be discussed between you and your boss , giving you all this option says something about him in my opinion.
There must be some local work , it seems strange if it has all dried up, he will surely need some local staff.
In any event , my best wishes go to you and your family .
 

Pete999

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That’s what work is for, yes.
If you think that work is a main priority in life, you’re probably not doing it right.
I'm not working any more Gerry done my bit now down to you young cubs, I worked all my life to provide for my Family, Kids and extended family, " not doing it right" how dare you.
 

plugsandsparks

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To answer the op: You have been asked how you feel about working away. My advice is to be clear with your employer how you feel about it and give them the reasons (if you feel its appropriate). Working away does suit some people, more than others, sometimes people do enjoy the variety and freedom of working away, some hate it as its lost time with young children and anxious partners.
Make your feelings clear to the employer and hopefully everyone can be accommodated without layoffs.
 

Baddegg

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I think the crux of this issue is not whether I (Pete999) worked I "rough countries or whatever" the crux is I knew what I had signed up for, hence no recriminations on my employers, I knew to some degree "what I was letting myself in for, so did my wife" that's all nothing else end of. If explaining what and where I had been constitutes " shouting down " then I'm guilty, I believe that this is not the case, and disagree with your inference Badegg.
I was referring to the grow a pair comment Pete
 
I'm not working any more Gerry done my bit now down to you young cubs, I worked all my life to provide for my Family, Kids and extended family, " not doing it right" how dare you.
Well done you. I’m a retired cub too.
I see so many that work is a main priority, it’s a mere lubricant in the grindstone of life. If you’re spoiling for a row..... you’re too late, it’s past my bedtime. 😄
 

ipf

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Sometimes the heart has to rule the head , and I think in your case you already know that.
I agree with the comments that this is a situation that has to be discussed between you and your boss , giving you all this option says something about him in my opinion.
There must be some local work , it seems strange if it has all dried up, he will surely need some local staff.
In any event , my best wishes go to you and your family .
Hi rus, not seen you around for a while. All OK, mate?
 

rapparee

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Sometimes the heart has to rule the head , and I think in your case you already know that.
I agree with the comments that this is a situation that has to be discussed between you and your boss , giving you all this option says something about him in my opinion.
There must be some local work , it seems strange if it has all dried up, he will surely need some local staff.
In any event , my best wishes go to you and your family .
Yes, there could be local work to keep a few men going, but if you are in the business of running big squads, then the firm might possibly, won't bother with this and just go after a few big jobs to keep them tied over whilst they're between contracts. The OP might have to stay at home and work for himself and live off homers for the next few months until the firm returns.

PS, good to "see" you again Ruston
 

ruston

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Yes, there could be local work to keep a few men going, but if you are in the business of running big squads, then the firm might possibly, won't bother with this and just go after a few big jobs to keep them tied over whilst they're between contracts. The OP might have to stay at home and work for himself and live off homers for the next few months until the firm returns.

PS, good to "see" you again Ruston
You too rap, I am still around and follow your posts, so be a good lad. :)
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Hi rus, not seen you around for a while. All OK, mate?
Yes thanks , had a few knock backs, but nothing too serious this time.
I am doing ok now though, starting physiotherapy tomorrow morning.
 
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ipf

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You too rap, I am still around and follow your posts, so be a good lad. :)
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Yes thanks , had a few knock backs, but nothing too serious this time.
I am doing ok now though, starting physiotherapy tomorrow morning.
I'll PM you, pal.
 

Midwest

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Her indoors works in HR. So I’ve asked her opinions on such matters (not giving away personal information of course).

If I recall, contracts of employment can be in written form or verbal. The contracts can be changed by the employer, if circumstances change.

IMO for the OP, if your not happy with the prospects with your current employment, I would start looking for different employment, that more suits your circumstances.

I would recommend you contact Acas, and get some free and professional advice, about your current situation;
(that’s her indoors advice)
 
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  • #48
So, if they've no work locally at present, do you expect them to pay you a wage if you won't work away?
You've got to go with the flow. Seems to me they're being fair for indicating home work in the near future, when available.
If you don't want the work, don't go. You could always ask them to keep you in hand for the future. Explain your situation to 'em.
They do have local work. But have a few jobs out of town and are probing to see who will go
 

Baddegg

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They do have local work. But have a few jobs out of town and are probing to see who will go
I’d advise sitting down with your employer John and explaining your situation you may find someone else is more than happy to work away and you could balance things out between you
 
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I’m sorry about my behaviour yesterday. I don’t really know what to do about it. A do not feel good about going and neither does my partner. I also feel there are others who could go even thow it’s probably not fair of me to say that
 

KennyKen

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I work 2 weeks on 2 weeks off, I used to work 4 weeks away and 1 off. Not going to lie it’s hard on the family especially if they are not used to it.

Right now I’m writing this before my flight takes off to go bk home... 2 weeks off!!!
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Ok, So after reading through the posts... how long is your employer proposing you work away for? Until April next year?

If it’s for a short duration would you consider just getting it done? Saves trying to find another Job ETC...
 
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rapparee

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I’m sorry about my behaviour yesterday. I don’t really know what to do about it. A do not feel good about going and neither does my partner. I also feel there are others who could go even thow it’s probably not fair of me to say that
Its not fair, especially if you are both on the same money. Having one guy who gets to stay at home and someone else staying away will breed resentment
 
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I work 2 weeks on 2 weeks off, I used to work 4 weeks away and 1 off. Not going to lie it’s hard on the family especially if they are not used to it.

Right now I’m writing this before my flight takes off to go bk home... 2 weeks off!!!
Post automatically merged:

Ok, So after reading through the posts... how long is your employer proposing you work away for? Until April next year?

If it’s for a short duration would you consider just getting it done? Saves trying to find another Job ETC...
Not really.
Its not fair, especially if you are both on the same money. Having one guy who gets to stay at home and someone else staying away will breed resentment
i do agree but years ago when I was younger, I had to go away week after week whilst all the older boys got to stay home. It’s the way it is and in my opinion should be. We all do our bit in our younger years and then as time goes on we earn the right to say no and leave it to the younger lads
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Not really.

i do agree but years ago when I was younger, I had to go away week after week whilst all the older boys got to stay home. It’s the way it is and in my opinion should be. We all do our bit in our younger years and then as time goes on we earn the right to say no and leave it to the younger lads. Obviously some people keep doing it and that’s fine. As long as you want to do it.
 

KennyKen

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Ok well the only option I can see is you getting your resume ready... and have a chat with your manager/Supervisor about your personal situation. If they don’t accommodate then at least you know where you stand.
 

ferg

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I don't think I could do it again either.
It's always a balance between spending time with the kids and providing for them.

If you get the balance right quit work and write a book about it. :)
 
Am I the only one on here who actually prefers working away? The wife has just had a hip replacement op so I've just had two weeks at home looking after the kids (14 & 20). I'm gagging to get away again. Looking forward to going out for a meal with the lads and then back to the room to a TV all of my own. Bloody great :D
 

KennyKen

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Am I the only one on here who actually prefers working away? The wife has just had a hip replacement op so I've just had two weeks at home looking after the kids (14 & 20). I'm gagging to get away again. Looking forward to going out for a meal with the lads and then back to the room to a TV all of my own. Bloody great :D
I personally like doing a Roster... I only work 6 months of the year.
 

littlespark

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I’m not in the same situation now, but last time I worked away away was 2005, 6 weeks at Heathrow airport.
We planned a family holiday at legoland, then I sent my pregnant wife and 5 year old girl home on a train to Dundee and I kept the car with me.
I wasn’t too popular with the wife for a few weeks after that.

I feel for the OP. Everyone’s telling him to find a new job, but it’s not that easy. A worry at any time of year.
If your workmates know your health situation, they won’t be bothered if you stay nearer home and they have to do the distance jobs
 

PEG

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I think this topic is very much subjective,and each individual situation,and work requirement,will be different.

I can perfectly understand lads,in situations,where certain choices will be limited,or even not really a choice at all.

I have done the skitting round the world,and hours job,and made my priorities plain,when my lads arrived :)

I will not have many situations,workwise,where i could not or would not,drop,the minute my kids were either in need of me,or at a sportsday,parent's evening or similar.

I realise i have been fortunate enough,to allow this as a choice,but have also,accepted the fact that a certain income stream is closed off.

If it matters,my eldest lad is 17,and i can categorically tell you,i made the right decision :):)
 

Pete999

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I don't think I could do it again either.
It's always a balance between spending time with the kids and providing for them.

If you get the balance right quit work and write a book about it. :)
That's what I did, write a book about it
 

GMES

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Up until 2 years ago all my work was within an hours drive but since then we've had to go wherever the work is. I had 3 lads down in felixstowe from January to April only coming back at weekends. Did they want to do it , probably not but they knew that if they wanted wages then it had to be done.
No boss wants it either, the logistics of it all can be a pain, booking accommodation, organising food allowances etc then if there was any issues i had a 8 hour round trip to sort it out or them out.
You do what you have to do to put food on the table simple as that.
 
I worked away a lot, the main thing was when working away I worked long hours, but also had long breaks so in many ways saw more of wife and children. 12 hours days were the norm when working away, often with over time as well, depending on distance often it was 6 or 7 day working while away, first one I did was 8 weeks away and 2 weeks home, that was Algeria, so not that far, Next was Falklands that was 6 months on, and month off, then moved closer to home, Suffolk, I live in North Wales, but time wise took as long to get home from Suffolk as Algeria.

However in Suffolk there was a mixture of away and local workers, so there was loads of over time, as local workers did not want it, so away workers did it all. We also had the long weekend, so once a month we would end early on the Friday around 10 am and would not restart work until the Tuesday, however there was a lot of money lost if you did not get back to work by 7:30 am Tuesday, as we lost travel and lodging allowance.

They also had some odd rules introduced, for example no holidays permitted New year to Easter, don't think that was intended, but it happened.

It was a different life, unlike working abroad I could live in a caravan and have my wife and children visit me, OK latter on working in Hong Kong also had wife and youngest visit me, but first two away jobs, that was out of the question.

I worked away a lot, Belfast, Edinburgh, but working for one firm it was very different, we were installing alarms in BT buildings Wales and West, it was to finish before 2000 as whole point was to replace alarms that would fail once 2000 had been reached, the job started in North Wales, so I was local, but slowly moved South, so first travelling increased, then had to lodge, with each job being between 2 days and 2 weeks we could not have a regular lodging, we had to hunt to find lodging and allowed £25 a day, once lodging no travel, it was not ideal, the hours were short no overtime, all weekends off, only plus was we travelled to work in their time.

In the end we got a bonus scheme and money went up, we could work late and so earn bonus, but whole team had to do that, as group bonus, working with my son, it worked for me, but other teams got no bonus and worked a flat week.

The working time directive messed up away work in the UK. I think in theory the time is spread over 12 weeks? So you could work long hours and 7 days a week, if you then got a weeks break, some firms would pay holidays not taken, really against the law, but they did it anyway, but agencies would follow the working time directive to the letter, so when we needed cash on a job, and my boss said book 2 extra hours, the agency refused to pay, as I would have broken the working time directive, firms can get away with some by saying it was a continuous process, can't leave a panel until made safe etc.

Being in work on stand-by with concrete pours earned me a lot of money drinking tea, but those jobs are few and far between.

So away working was good, but today the working time directive has messed it up a bit, it depends how flexible the boss is, even volunteering on local railway we have hours restrictions, the drivers and firemen must be replaced half way through the day and trains only run from 10 am to 6:10 pm. OK they have to light the fire and clean out before and after, but fireman does that, yes here the fireman lights fires he does not put them out.

It would seem smaller firms get away with breaking the working time directive and can offer good terms, I have had this job is paid until Wednesday next week, once finished your time is yours, you can go home, but not with large firms.
 

Pete999

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Arms
Esteemed
I worked away a lot, the main thing was when working away I worked long hours, but also had long breaks so in many ways saw more of wife and children. 12 hours days were the norm when working away, often with over time as well, depending on distance often it was 6 or 7 day working while away, first one I did was 8 weeks away and 2 weeks home, that was Algeria, so not that far, Next was Falklands that was 6 months on, and month off, then moved closer to home, Suffolk, I live in North Wales, but time wise took as long to get home from Suffolk as Algeria.

However in Suffolk there was a mixture of away and local workers, so there was loads of over time, as local workers did not want it, so away workers did it all. We also had the long weekend, so once a month we would end early on the Friday around 10 am and would not restart work until the Tuesday, however there was a lot of money lost if you did not get back to work by 7:30 am Tuesday, as we lost travel and lodging allowance.

They also had some odd rules introduced, for example no holidays permitted New year to Easter, don't think that was intended, but it happened.

It was a different life, unlike working abroad I could live in a caravan and have my wife and children visit me, OK latter on working in Hong Kong also had wife and youngest visit me, but first two away jobs, that was out of the question.

I worked away a lot, Belfast, Edinburgh, but working for one firm it was very different, we were installing alarms in BT buildings Wales and West, it was to finish before 2000 as whole point was to replace alarms that would fail once 2000 had been reached, the job started in North Wales, so I was local, but slowly moved South, so first travelling increased, then had to lodge, with each job being between 2 days and 2 weeks we could not have a regular lodging, we had to hunt to find lodging and allowed £25 a day, once lodging no travel, it was not ideal, the hours were short no overtime, all weekends off, only plus was we travelled to work in their time.

In the end we got a bonus scheme and money went up, we could work late and so earn bonus, but whole team had to do that, as group bonus, working with my son, it worked for me, but other teams got no bonus and worked a flat week.

The working time directive messed up away work in the UK. I think in theory the time is spread over 12 weeks? So you could work long hours and 7 days a week, if you then got a weeks break, some firms would pay holidays not taken, really against the law, but they did it anyway, but agencies would follow the working time directive to the letter, so when we needed cash on a job, and my boss said book 2 extra hours, the agency refused to pay, as I would have broken the working time directive, firms can get away with some by saying it was a continuous process, can't leave a panel until made safe etc.

Being in work on stand-by with concrete pours earned me a lot of money drinking tea, but those jobs are few and far between.

So away working was good, but today the working time directive has messed it up a bit, it depends how flexible the boss is, even volunteering on local railway we have hours restrictions, the drivers and firemen must be replaced half way through the day and trains only run from 10 am to 6:10 pm. OK they have to light the fire and clean out before and after, but fireman does that, yes here the fireman lights fires he does not put them out.

It would seem smaller firms get away with breaking the working time directive and can offer good terms, I have had this job is paid until Wednesday next week, once finished your time is yours, you can go home, but not with large firms.
I worked away on many occasions longest was 1 year, worst year of my life but had all the monetary perks, which didn't compensate for loss of family contact, my own fault I was in need of lots of readies for my house purchase, didn't make it any more palatable though, still think about it now after nearly 40 years. it haunts me from time to time. reckon I have PTSD. Did loads of shorter trips away, none very pleasant, but we survived as a Family, just.
 

KennyKen

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Arms
Esteemed
I worked 4 weeks on and 1 week off for 3 years. Had to pull the pin. Missus & Kids wanted me home.
 
It's a difficult one this is because people are required to work away from home which is something you can't change. It's okay when you have no family. However, in your circumstance, you must talk to your company and tell them about about your situation. They should understand.
 

Pete999

-
Arms
Esteemed
It's a difficult one this is because people are required to work away from home which is something you can't change. It's okay when you have no family. However, in your circumstance, you must talk to your company and tell them about about your situation. They should understand.
In todays' climate Mate I doubt very much that will happen, they are in business and peoples' individual requirements regarding families' etc won't cut much ice, nice thoughts though, and you would hope that companies would understand, some of the bigger ones may, sadly not all do.
 
In todays' climate Mate I doubt very much that will happen, they are in business and peoples' individual requirements regarding families' etc won't cut much ice, nice thoughts though, and you would hope that companies would understand, some of the bigger ones may, sadly not all do.
Source URL: The Working Away question - https://www.electriciansforums.net/threads/the-working-away-question.180886/page-2#post-1595507
Thats the problem, it depends on the size of the company. A billionaire business owner won't care about his situation, they only want money. He may need a new job in his local area, that his best bet.
 

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