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Discuss Wireless smoke detectors - advice needed in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

darkwood

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I would just like to interject with a caution with regards to radio-link detectors, some structural details of buildings can block or interfere with the signal, if your building has any mesh within its build be it pinning insulation back or as I have personally experienced 'steel mesh base plastered ceilings' then you may have no end of issues, setting them up or random alarms when signal is weak or lost.
Luckily steel mesh isn't a common choice so likely you should be good.
 

DC-backfrom the past

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Hi - I’ve heard that Scotland has approved the 10 year battery powered radio linked detectors for use (?). I’ve not heard anything for England. These detectors would appear to be classified as Type F but there’s no installation showing use of Type F in Table 1 of BS5839-6 2013 that I can see (?). So I’m thinking in England (at least) we still can’t make a standards approved D LD2 system from them(?).
the 10 year battery radio linked are accepted for use in a lot of areas .however I ran into a problem recently with a building standards officer who insisted on all being hard wired
it was lathe and plaster ceiling and no live loop in at lights .

I had to use a new scolmore product to switch the live at the light fitting whilst allowing a permanent live to the heat detector.
RFIM-40B you need a retractive switch as well.

price for switch transmitter and receiver was about £80 however the kitchen had just been decorated and above the floor had been tiled so no access.
so whilst pricey it saved labour damage and redecoration or unsightly trunking.

down side it runs on batteries and they last about 3 - 5 years .
 

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JK-Electrical

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Hi - I’ve heard that Scotland has approved the 10 year battery powered radio linked detectors for use (?). I’ve not heard anything for England. These detectors would appear to be classified as Type F but there’s no installation showing use of Type F in Table 1 of BS5839-6 2013 that I can see (?). So I’m thinking in England (at least) we still can’t make a standards approved D LD2 system from them(?).
Legislation came into effect in Scotland on 1st March this year that permits the use of either mains-operated alarms or tamper proof long-life lithium battery alarms in private rented accommodation. Although I will always install mains-operated alarms where possible, there will be times, however, when battery-operated alarms will take preference. I've already installed around two dozen of the battery-operated alarms and am well-pleased with their performance and ease of installation.

However, new builds still require mains-operated alarms to be installed as do projects such as extensions and attic conversions that are subject to a building warrant. Building Control insist on mains-operated alarms and will not accept battery-operated alarms under any circumstances.
 

Megawatt

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USA Advisor
So here is what I'm thinking...
1) Master bedroom EI208WRF battery CO, wireless - not for any big reason except that it's the main tenant's bedroom and it will go off if anything else in the system triggers
2) Three other bedrooms - nothing (but maybe...another 3 CO detectors and I can say it's BS EN 50292 compliant)
3) Landing EI161e & EI100MRF mains ionisation, wireless
4) Lounge EI208WRF battery CO, wireless and EI650RF battery optical, wireless - not sure if I can pick up mains in the ceiling easily as the light has a plaster surround. But this would be not quite BS 5839-6 compliant
5) Hall EI166e & EI100MRF mains optical, wireless (next to the kitchen)
6) Dining room - nothing (infrequent use, but maybe another CO for BS EN 50292)
7) Kitchen with gas hob EI3028 & EI3000MRF mains CO & Heat combo, wireless (about the same price as 2 separate detectors)
8) Utility with boiler and tumble drier, maybe fridge EI208WRF battery CO, wireless AND EI3024 & EI3000MRF mains heat & smoke combo, wireless. This is the room I am nervous about because of the tumble drier and fridge, shades of Grenfell...
9) EI450 Controller for easy testing
Naylorpd just throwing this out there the NEC requires all bedrooms hallways and kitchen and I know that the UK has different regulations but in the US especially rental properties all bedrooms the hallway, and kitchen must have smoke detectors and must have a backup battery and has to be hard wired plus interlink by wiring and when 1 goes off they all go off. Then when you call for a final inspection he will have a can of smoke to test them, just saying
 

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