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Planning a decking project for the rear garden, looking to install 2 bulkhead lights on the fence adjacent to the decking and LED lights around the base.

My plan was to install and external socket which will connect to the mains via a 3 plug pin, is it suitable for the External socket to power LED decking light via 1 3 pin plug and the 2 bulkhead lights to another 3pin plug? or am i overloading?

I also have a External light with PIR, if needs be i could remove this and install the bulkhead light via this connection?

Any advise will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in Advance

Screenshot 2020-03-26 at 15.39.09.pngScreenshot 2020-03-26 at 15.39.55.pngScreenshot 2020-03-26 at 15.40.25.png
 
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I don't know the rules for NI but it might be that adding an external socket, etc, would require certification and local authority notification. Other on this forum will know much better than me.

In terms of power you will not be anywhere near the limit for a 13A socket, but for anything outdoors you have to consider both water (and insects, etc) getting in and the effects of UV light on some types of cable causing them to degrade. Also anything that is within touching height outside has the additional safety hazard of faults potentially causing a fatal electric shock due to someone also being conductive to the true ground.

You might already have the 13A circuits protected by an RCD in which case that is OK, but you really need to check.

Recently light circuits would be RCD protected as well, but many older installation are not, so if you have any plans to power this from an existing PIR light cable (which may be very convenient as the cable is already accessible outdoors) you need to check what sort of circuit (and any RCD protection) is used for it.

If none of the above made sense than get in a professional!
 
If you can plug an external socket into an indoor socket then that's a very simple way of doing it and perfectly adequate. Make absolutely sure the indoor socket you are coming from is protected by a 30ma RCD in the DB/CU.
 
If you can plug an external socket into an indoor socket then that's a very simple way of doing it and perfectly adequate. Make absolutely sure the indoor socket you are coming from is protected by a 30ma RCD in the DB/CU.
This is definitely the quickest and easiest solution if it is possible!

If you need the sockets to be outside due to cable lengths, etc, then the twin 13A type you show is ideal to make a "fixed" extension cable.

Just make sure you get a suitable gland for the cable to seal it where it enters the external socket box, and better if you can fit on the bottom as any imperfections in the seal are unlikely to let water in. To use it at the 13A capability (in case you ever plan on using it for power tools, lawnmower, etc) you should get something like 3-core 1.5mm cable.

Some of those "sealed" sockets have points in the backing box where you are supposed to create a hole to let any water out (e.g. condensation, etc). Should be clear from the instructions.

If you don't have RCD protection for your property then you can get RCD adaptors (or even wire-on plugs) which would also be a simple way to make a safe external power outlet.

However, one disadvantage of many RCD adaptors is they have a "no volt" release, so have to be turned on after any power failure. This is deliberate so power tools don't come to life unexpectedly if the supply fails and is restored with the tool still switched on!
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Yep. Ain't it good to see a bit of common sense from a DIYer.
Well done SS.
…...don't forget the RCD, though.
Yes, property I fitted with RCD protection
Post automatically merged:

This is definitely the quickest and easiest solution if it is possible!

If you need the sockets to be outside due to cable lengths, etc, then the twin 13A type you show is ideal to make a "fixed" extension cable.

Just make sure you get a suitable gland for the cable to seal it where it enters the external socket box, and better if you can fit on the bottom as any imperfections in the seal are unlikely to let water in. To use it at the 13A capability (in case you ever plan on using it for power tools, lawnmower, etc) you should get something like 3-core 1.5mm cable.

Some of those "sealed" sockets have points in the backing box where you are supposed to create a hole to let any water out (e.g. condensation, etc). Should be clear from the instructions.

If you don't have RCD protection for your property then you can get RCD adaptors (or even wire-on plugs) which would also be a simple way to make a safe external power outlet.

However, one disadvantage of many RCD adaptors is they have a "no volt" release, so have to be turned on after any power failure. This is deliberate so power tools don't come to life unexpectedly if the supply fails and is restored with the tool still switched on!
Thanks for the reply, I’ll go with
3-core 1.5mm cable, the internal socket will be coming high level from my bedroom, hole already drilled for old sky cable which will be removed, I assume I’ll not need armoured cable as not underground.
 
Armoured wire (SWA) is great but probably overkill for your application. Strictly speaking you should get wire that is rated for outdoor use (i.e. UV hardened) but often that is not flexible (so difficult to use with a 13A plug, but OK for a fused switch outlet) and/or only available in big reels.

Some examples are:
  • Tuf-sheath cable (such as "NYYJ3C1.5") which looks like normal 3-core but harder cover and single-core, so unsuited to repeated bending, available by the meter from CEF.
  • Silicone Rubber sheathed cable, typically for high temperature use (e.g., boiler or immersion heater, etc). Easy to flex and surprisingly resistant to most things. RS sell it on 25m reels for £60 but out of stock which I just looked (e.g. path number 744-0981 or 744-0985)
  • Flexishield cable to BS 8436 (a bit like armoured, but aluminium foil instead of steel wires), designed to be safe if penetrated by a nail, etc, but also UV tolerant. CEF sell it by 100m drum only at around £110
  • H07RN-F flexible cable "recommended in dry , damp or wet workshops, indoor and outdoor, for example in explosive atmosphere ( as ATEX) according to regulation of the country and with some additional recommendations and also for industrial devices and agricultures workshops"
I think the rubber flex type "HO7RNF3C1.5" is suitable for outdoor use and possibly your best choice if using a 13A plug, etc. Also it is available by the meter from suppliers such as Superlec and CEF, etc.
 

Matthewd29

-
Arms
Esteemed
I don't know the rules for NI but it might be that adding an external socket, etc, would require certification and local authority notification. Other on this forum will know much better than me.

In terms of power you will not be anywhere near the limit for a 13A socket, but for anything outdoors you have to consider both water (and insects, etc) getting in and the effects of UV light on some types of cable causing them to degrade. Also anything that is within touching height outside has the additional safety hazard of faults potentially causing a fatal electric shock due to someone also being conductive to the true ground.

You might already have the 13A circuits protected by an RCD in which case that is OK, but you really need to check.

Recently light circuits would be RCD protected as well, but many older installation are not, so if you have any plans to power this from an existing PIR light cable (which may be very convenient as the cable is already accessible outdoors) you need to check what sort of circuit (and any RCD protection) is used for it.

If none of the above made sense than get in a professional!
Rules for the north are exact same as mainland except no part P whatsoever so no notification etc required. No differences apart from that
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Armoured wire (SWA) is great but probably overkill for your application. Strictly speaking you should get wire that is rated for outdoor use (i.e. UV hardened) but often that is not flexible (so difficult to use with a 13A plug, but OK for a fused switch outlet) and/or only available in big reels.

Some examples are:
  • Tuf-sheath cable (such as "NYYJ3C1.5") which looks like normal 3-core but harder cover and single-core, so unsuited to repeated bending, available by the meter from CEF.
  • Silicone Rubber sheathed cable, typically for high temperature use (e.g., boiler or immersion heater, etc). Easy to flex and surprisingly resistant to most things. RS sell it on 25m reels for £60 but out of stock which I just looked (e.g. path number 744-0981 or 744-0985)
  • Flexishield cable to BS 8436 (a bit like armoured, but aluminium foil instead of steel wires), designed to be safe if penetrated by a nail, etc, but also UV tolerant. CEF sell it by 100m drum only at around £110
  • H07RN-F flexible cable "recommended in dry , damp or wet workshops, indoor and outdoor, for example in explosive atmosphere ( as ATEX) according to regulation of the country and with some additional recommendations and also for industrial devices and agricultures workshops"
I think the rubber flex type "HO7RNF3C1.5" is suitable for outdoor use and possibly your best choice if using a 13A plug, etc. Also it is available by the meter from suppliers such as Superlec and CEF, etc.
Thanks for the reply and taking the time to recommend products!!
 

telectrix

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
2nd vote for HO7RHf. esy to use and souitable for environment.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Armoured wire (SWA) is great but probably overkill for your application. Strictly speaking you should get wire that is rated for outdoor use (i.e. UV hardened) but often that is not flexible (so difficult to use with a 13A plug, but OK for a fused switch outlet) and/or only available in big reels.

Some examples are:
  • Tuf-sheath cable (such as "NYYJ3C1.5") which looks like normal 3-core but harder cover and single-core, so unsuited to repeated bending, available by the meter from CEF.
  • Silicone Rubber sheathed cable, typically for high temperature use (e.g., boiler or immersion heater, etc). Easy to flex and surprisingly resistant to most things. RS sell it on 25m reels for £60 but out of stock which I just looked (e.g. path number 744-0981 or 744-0985)
  • Flexishield cable to BS 8436 (a bit like armoured, but aluminium foil instead of steel wires), designed to be safe if penetrated by a nail, etc, but also UV tolerant. CEF sell it by 100m drum only at around £110
  • H07RN-F flexible cable "recommended in dry , damp or wet workshops, indoor and outdoor, for example in explosive atmosphere ( as ATEX) according to regulation of the country and with some additional recommendations and also for industrial devices and agricultures workshops"
I think the rubber flex type "HO7RNF3C1.5" is suitable for outdoor use and possibly your best choice if using a 13A plug, etc. Also it is available by the meter from suppliers such as Superlec and CEF, etc.
Will HO7RNF3C1.5 also be my best choice for wiring the bulkhead lights?

What is the best way to wire the bulkhead lights series or parallel?
 

telectrix

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
wire in parallel. series would give you 240/X volts per light. where X =no.of lights.
do you know the difference?
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
wire in parallel. series would give you 240/X volts per light. where X =no.of lights.
do you know the difference?
Yes in Series i would get 120v per light,

Whereas in parallel i will get a full power to both lights.

What do i need to enable me to do this, a junction Box?
 
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