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C

cctbreaker

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OK guys, what jointing method do you recommend for inaccessible joint that will be in a chased out wall ie plastered over? Is crimping and heat shrink sleeving ok? or do you use the compound liquid jointy things? or summat else?
 
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T

TPES

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
On the kitchen re-wires i did we had to thru crimp the old ring at high level and then put blanking plate on as all connections have to be accessible.
 
C

cctbreaker

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
I thought it was removable connections that had to be accessible - like screw terminals.:confused: Didn't think a crimp needed to be. What I was concerned about was protecting the crimp and sealing the joint.
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Crimp and heat shrink is an acceptable method of cable jointing.

However, screw connections MUST be available for inspection.

Have a look in the regs. Its all in there.
 
D

DanBrown

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  • #5
I hope im not nit-picking here, but doesn't plaster have a resistance?. What im trying to say is if you crimp the connection with normal insulated crimps and the plaster over the joint, we all know that plaster is partially solid - liquid and can cover the joint fully creating a connection between
L - N , L - E or N-E etc hense giving a small leakage current.

Bit of feedback please
 
Through crimps and heat shrink tube are fine. If you stagger the Line-Neutral -earth connections it makes the whole joint smaller, then you can use the heat shrink on the individual connections and slide a larger piece over the whole lot therefore doubling the insulation!
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
I hope im not nit-picking here, but doesn't plaster have a resistance?. What im trying to say is if you crimp the connection with normal insulated crimps and the plaster over the joint, we all know that plaster is partially solid - liquid and can cover the joint fully creating a connection between
L - N , L - E or N-E etc hense giving a small leakage current.

Bit of feedback please
Heatshrink, if applied correctly will prevent this from happening normally.
 
C

cctbreaker

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
I like that suggestion dazza69 :cool: Never thought of that -I'll remember that one.

I was just a bit concerned that heat shrink sleeving is so thin compared with the pvc sheathing and may not be acceptable sheathing for installing in damp plaster. Anyway, has to be better than one job I saw which was a definite nono. It used a terminal block wrapped in tape!:eek:
 
W

wattsup

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Cable jointing, are you having a laugh? Solid core should never ever be 'crimped' (mind you the test bunnies will never know) -:
 
C

cctbreaker

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Cable jointing, are you having a laugh? Solid core should never ever be 'crimped' (mind you the test bunnies will never know) -:
:confused: By solid core do you mean single core as in T&E? If so, please tell me you're joking - I usually do crimp these.
 
M

montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
its a long running discussion...personally I dont like it but have done it once, it is acceptable by NIC but the old school were taught it was a big no no
 
O

optician

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
At college we were told that you should only crimp multi core/stranded, as single core can become loose. Although I have seen crimps specifically for solid core, I think?
 
D

DanBrown

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Ive never had a problem with crimping solid core. If you use the correct size crimp makes a big difference. Usually the blue through crimps do a good job for 1.5 / 2.5mm.
 
C

cctbreaker

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
So those who don't crimp - what would you do - solder presumably?
 
M

mazolaman

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
One thing I got pulled on the other day,that I didnt know,the crimps have their own rating,therefore,I had used a blue on 2.5 t+e,to be told it was rated at 20 amps,and should have been the yellow one.
So,is in the ceiling void considered accessable?
 
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