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Elecmox

Elecmox

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Let me show you my first soldering.
This is my first attempt:
IMG_20200526_171716.jpg
This is my second attempt:
IMG_20200526_171740.jpg

Please, be gentle. :)
 
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pc1966

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Looks fine to me!

You need to take care that any of then ends sticking up don't puncture through the insulation you put over it, but you can usually take the worst of any spike off by gently squashing with pliers.
 
Spoon

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As above, or just nip the pointy ends off with a pair of snips.
I'd usually use a bit more solder as well, looking at the second pic.
 
Elecmox

Elecmox

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I didn't twist wires good, thats why it's sticking, or maybe I have move them with solder tip. I have done couple of times more, and it doesn't stick.

I have a bit of tin on the solder iron tip, how to clean this?

IMG_20200526_190626.jpg
 
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pc1966

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Normally you have a slightly damp sponge (not a nylon one that melts) to wipe the tip, but a slightly damp cotton cloth should do instead.

Don't leave the iron on for long period without use though, in particular with lead-free solder it ends up with a blackened tip that is poor at "wetting" the solder. You get little tubs of grey solid paste-like stuff to do that. Here is some example of it being used:
 
Elecmox

Elecmox

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I have a wet sponge.
I wiped the tip and it's clean, but lower you see a blob that I couldn't remove.
I didn't wiped it off soon before it harden.
Next time when I solder, will it melt so that I can wipe it off?
 
Lucien Nunes

Lucien Nunes

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Yes, there should always be some solder on the tip. When you switch the iron on to begin work, add fresh solder so that the flux cleans the surface, then wipe it off. If the iron stands for more than a few minutes while it is hot, flick off any stale solder and add fresh before making a joint.

Pretty good for a first go. Making an in-line joint like that, I would aim to have less bare wire and to twist it more tightly. If the wires are nicely prepared, the actual soldering is easier and quicker, and the result neater. Once you get practice at controlling the temperature, you will find that once the wire has absorbed as much solder as it needs, you can leave a smooth coating of solder that covers any sharp ends. Your insulation is a little melted which suggests spending too long heating the joint, although how fast you can work depends on how well matched the iron tip is to the size of cable and what temperature it reaches. I would expect to have the iron in contact with the wire for about 4-5 seconds to complete that joint.

Tomorrow I'll be making many joints in cables 0.5...6.0mm², I'll take pics.
 
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davesparks

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Normally you have a slightly damp sponge (not a nylon one that melts) to wipe the tip, but a slightly damp cotton cloth should do instead.
On site I've got into the habit of just wiping it on my jeans and carrying on, but that's probably not such a good idea if you wear those designer tradesmens trousers that are all the rage
 
Elecmox

Elecmox

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On site I've got into the habit of just wiping it on my jeans and carrying on, but that's probably not such a good idea if you wear those designer tradesmens trousers that are all the rage
Thanks, but no thanks. :) I need my trousers on.
 
Lucien Nunes

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OK here are some examples of straight inline joints of equal-size cables. Obviously different configurations merit different methods. For speed, all of these joints were made with a 3.5mm chisel tip at 365°C.

0.5mm² Tri-rated soldered with Alpha Vaculoy lead-free:
20200528_172930.jpg
20200528_173001.jpg20200528_173122.jpg

Next is 4.0mm² 6491B conduit cable soldered with Alpha Vaculoy lead-free and sleeved with adhesive-lined medium-wall 3:1 heatshrink
20200528_174512.jpg20200528_174548.jpg20200528_174908.jpg20200528_175154.jpg20200528_175344.jpg
More in the next post...
Post automatically merged:

Then we have 10.0mm² tri-rated, strands interlocked, bound with 29SWG tinned copper, soldered with 60/40 Crystal 511 and insulated with PVC tape. The PVC was applied with a 90% overlap and then a 50% overlap in the opposite direction. Once completed, I cut through the middle of the joint to show that it is solid copper/solder, circular in section and evenly covered with PVC equal in thickness to the original insulation.
20200528_173227.jpg20200528_173258.jpg20200528_173515.jpg20200528_173808.jpg20200528_174057.jpg20200528_174317.jpg
 
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