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Charlie_

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I need to get a 110v supply from a wall, through a door frame and into the glass rebate of a door..
Has anybody successfully done this?
I want it to be concealed so the little boxes with flexible conduit are no good.
I’m thinking of using power transfer hinges.
It’s to power smart glass in the door..
The windows are easy enough as they are all stationary.
 

James

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there are so many types of transfer hinge. can you post a link?
 

Charlie_

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Yes will try to.. The ones I’ve used previously are for elv supplies so struggling to find one avtually rated for 110v
 

James

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Yes will try to.. The ones I’ve used previously are for elv supplies so struggling to find one avtually rated for 110v
there are loads of spring contacts out there but not suitable for 110v
you could transform 110 down to 30 outside the frame and then step back up inside the door but its a messy solution and the current at 30v might be higher than the contacts are rated at.
 

Charlie_

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Not got much room to play with inside the glass rebates..
The glass comes with 2 thin tails which I will twist,solder & heat shrink onto the supply legs..
The load is about 10 watts..
The other option I was thinking of was how to concertina the wires up in the frame rebate when the door closes
 

Charlie_

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Timber door and frame..
Transformers located elsewhere..
I have wired supplies from transformer to door frame location
 

James

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That looks like a good and simple solution.
I shall investigate further :)
the spec has no voltage limits listed. I am presuming it is just the conduit with no cable inside. but it also fails to list the internal diameter so its not a guaranteed fix but might be suitable.
 

Charlie_

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Its not the door that is smart, the 110v is for the actual glass.. SmartGlass is just one of the brand names given to it. Others go by the name of Intelligent Glass, Switch Glass..
The last one being my favourite name; as that is what it is. Nothing smart or intelligent about it, just a gimmicky name to hook people in.
Basically it’s layers of glass with liquid crystal in between the layers.
Goes from opaque to clear with voltage supplied.
 

ipf

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Its not the door that is smart, the 110v is for the actual glass.. SmartGlass is just one of the brand names given to it. Others go by the name of Intelligent Glass, Switch Glass..
The last one being my favourite name; as that is what it is. Nothing smart or intelligent about it, just a gimmicky name to hook people in.
Basically it’s layers of glass with liquid crystal in between the layers.
Goes from opaque to clear with voltage supplied.
Lads have just done one in a top of the range, ongoing job. It's basically a glass outside wall of a bathroom which changes from clear to opaque when in use. Mind blowing spec to the job.
 

Charlie_

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Lads have just done one in a top of the range, ongoing job. It's basically a glass outside wall of a bathroom which changes from clear to opaque when in use. Mind blowing spec to the job.
You can also vary the voltage to the glass to alter the opacity..
Which brand did you install?
Was it also 110v?
The job i’m currently involved in has it specced up for an orangery.. I’ve also used it for offices and between gyms and pools.
 

pirate

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Charlie, you just answered a question i was about to ask...ie can you vary the opacity? I presume this is the case for all such glass?
I have a project for which this application would be perfect, so could you link me to a preferred supplier to save me hours of research?
 

DPG

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Bit of a bugger if the power fails while you're starkers in the bathroom. Or does it fail safe?
 

Charlie_

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Charlie, you just answered a question i was about to ask...ie can you vary the opacity? I presume this is the case for all such glass?
I have a project for which this application would be perfect, so could you link me to a preferred supplier to save me hours of research?
Sales Manager: Jamie Conroy.
That’s the company that supplies the glass for our current job.
They also do a film to fit into existing glass.. small samples are available.
 

marconi

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Just a thought - keep it simple and use super flexible wire to bridge between the static and moving parts:



or this one for 'abrupt and fast movement applications such as cranes and robots':

 
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Charlie_

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Just a thought - keep it simple and use super flexible wire to bridge between the static and moving parts:



or this one for 'abrupt and fast movement applications such as cranes and robots':

Thank you, very good options
 

marconi

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What happens if it is broken - (may have been asked already) - is there any electric shock risk?
 

Charlie_

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What happens if it is broken - (may have been asked already) - is there any electric shock risk?
It’s a fairly new product so reliability is difficult to research, can only go on manufacturers assurances and guarantees.
I’m supplying the glass at 110v using an isolating transformer
 

James

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What happens if it is broken - (may have been asked already) - is there any electric shock risk?
I would have thought that if supplied by an isolating transformer, the shock risk would be negligible if the output is not ground referenced.

in my opinion, the most dangerous electrical fitting in most houses is the good old BC lamp holder. possible to access live terminals without any special tool by untrained people often working in the dark.
 

Charlie_

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I would have thought that if supplied by an isolating transformer, the shock risk would be negligible if the output is not ground referenced.

in my opinion, the most dangerous electrical fitting in most houses is the good old BC lamp holder. possible to access live terminals without any special tool by untrained people often working in the dark.
I was thinking the exact same thing at the weekend, whilst stopping my daughter from putting her hand under a shade to switch a table lamp on with nowt in the lamp holder.
Which reminds me, there is something I need to do.
 
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