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Discuss Domestic courses question, don't beat me. in the The Welcome Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Hi All
I'm new here and need some guidance on training to compliment my job.
I'm a self employed kitchen fitter that's looking into the hated domestic course so I can do my own electrics and sign off. I have a few reasons for this which I won't bore you with.
I fully understand that I will be very limited in knowledge gained by these courses, but i simply just want to limit myself to what's required for my kitchens. The biggest jobs that will occur is the consumer unit change and upgrading the earth bonding, I know there the most important.
With my knowledge being limited, should I survey a kitchen and think I could potentially hit a snag, I would book an electrician. One of my old electricians whom I'm friends with has offered to be a helpline and even bail me out if things go tits up.

I know these courses get slated for teaching slap dash cowboys that don't give a ---- about their quality of work or their customers. I'm not like that, I'm overly conscientious. This is one reason of wanting to do it myself, sparks I've used don't think like me and I've had enough. I dare say there are amazing sparkies out there but I've had no luck.
Reading about me and my work, do you guys think it's worth me doing?

The money I would spend I would get back in 12 months, so cost isn't an issue.
The course supplier is Electrical Courses For You.

Thanks for any help or beatings.
 
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Spoon

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The biggest jobs that will occur is the consumer unit change
Hi mate.
Why would a kitchen need a consumer unit change?
I have nothing against these short courses, but from what I have read, you will only learn the basics.
 
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  • #3
As soon as we touch a circuit, it has to be on an rcd board. Plenty still don't have them.
From what my electrician is doing for me is pretty simple. Its repetition on each kitchen.
 

Rpa07

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Arms
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Its been raised on here before but you are better off culturing a relationship with a sole trader spark who could do your electrical changes when needed. You could help each other out and it could lead to work for both of you from each other. As long as they realise that they can’t let you down and need to be conscientious themselves then the money you save on the course could be spent paying them.
Doesn’t mean you can’t still do the course but get someone on your side first. You get to chose them which is good for you and giving them work is good for them.
 

Spoon

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As soon as we touch a circuit, it has to be on an rcd board. Plenty still don't have them.
Why not give the customer the option of change the breaker for an RCBO or just add a small consumer unit?
Yes a full board change is better, but it is not necessary.
Also it sounds like you are ripping off the customer if you don't give them all the options.
 

Spoon

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You do know that changing a consumer unit is notifiable work and the local building control body needs to be notified of the work?
This apparently costs a lot more money if you are mot a member of a scheme.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
07.
I've had a few electricians and they all seem to be the same around here. I mark where I need cables etc to suit the cabinets, still get it wrong, don't have the brains or common sense to put a bit of cardboard over new worktops where they are working and risk scratching them. Does my head in, oh then I got to clean up after them.
I'm confident I could do what they do in my kitchens and I don't have to work around or rely on somebody else.

With course fees, digs, time off and kit, I'm looking at 6k. I wouldn't do the course and not bother doing the work.
I'd get that back in less than a year after not paying for a sparky.
 

Baddegg

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Mate don’t assume after the £6k and time off you are anywhere near where the course providers tell you you’ll be.....all they do is teach you to pass the exams......I promise you you’ll get stuck in the real world, I’m not saying don’t do it but don’t think it’s as easy as doing a 5 week course and hey presto! There’s a reason the BBB is as thick as it is, even if only doing domestic there’s still a lot of theory that you can’t learn in 5 weeks......it’s not as simple as just changing a consumer unit......as always I wish you the best of luck.
 

stuarth

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Arms
Enduro73, I too am a kitchen fitter that did the coarse and have not regretted it at all, as long as you except your limitations and are willing to continue to further your knowledge you will be fine. That said the guys are right you will not learn everything needed on these short courses you must ask questions here and other places, and there are plenty of well written books available to help as well as some very good youtube content creators that will help to fill in some of the gaps from the short coarses you will always be learning which I find challenging as well as rewarding, good luck.
SparkyNinja - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWLwXHMTmD7qVZ4X2e0pEOg
GSH Electrical - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgtbE9w_d-u2AvPp3WBlPfQ
John Ward - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2uFFhnMKyF82UY2TbXRaNg
 
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  • #12
Thanks Stuart, very helpful indeed.
Much appreciated.
One thing I am clear about will be my limitations, I know I'm not coming out of that course an electrician but simply have the papers to carry out what I need.
 
There is absolutely nothing stopping you do your own wiring upgrades

You could simply do it now so long as notified the planning department in advance so you’re work is inspected

Or

for ease you can do a short electrical train course to get your part pee and notify you own work

Either way if you feel it’s better for business just do it
 

Wilko

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Arms
Esteemed
Hi - if you have a love of things electric then I’d say go for it. If it’s just a way to sign off work, you might find it doesn’t really work out for you. There is plenty of time and costs beyond the course and it’s not all beer and skittles.
Its a shame you haven’t found the right electrical partner for your work yet. I sometimes work with Mr Kitchen Fitter and we spend a happy few days. But I can follow instructions :) .
 
Id also say go for it, of course any sparky that has done proper training and been to college etc is gonna hate someone that just does a brief course and seems to be able to do the same jobs as them. But they/we will also admit that we learnt a lot once we were on the tools so go for it - your training is basically making you a safe installer. Dont expect to be taught every single good practice etc.

Experience counts a lot too. Make use of your sparky friend to give you training too in his spare time. get him to inspect your first few installs - that will give you loads of valuable advice.

good luck.
 
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