Bulk Workwear - Clothing Suppliers for the Whole Forum Network
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss going self employed in the Business Related area at ElectriciansForums.net

F

finn

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

well after 17yr ov been working for the local auth, its time too move on,and got a decent reduntantcy package;)

any how am in the process ov setting myself up on my own:confused:

had a look at a few jobs where the are asking for a certified contractor:confused:

does this mean i have to be NIC registered:confused:

i am a fully qaulified (16th) doing me part P end ov april

its scaring me a little:(

am i jumping in at the deepend,or is it not as hard as i think its going to be:confused:
 
Electrical2Go - Online Electrical Supplier
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
Hi Finn,

Depends what they mean by 'certified' and what type of work you are looking at.

To be able to work in a residential dwellings you need to be registered to one of the self cert schemes.

Have a look here where all the scheme operators are listed and you can take your pick!

http://www.electriciansforums.net/e...ons/4299-competent-person-schemes-part-p.html

However, it will be fairly hard, work wise, because of the economic climate at the moment.

Good luck!
 
Hi finn,
second what jason says, but also we are working to the 17th now and have been for some time ;)

not sure if you would be able to register with the 16th :confused:

you are a brave man choosing this current climate for setting up on your own and i wish you the very best of luck ;)
 
F

finn

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Thanks for the replies lads:)

to tell the truth i have been subcontracting for the last few months for a Co who was niceic

and found the work not a problem whatsoever, and he was 17th and a picked it up ne bother:)

but now am on me own, the last job i looked at the building control will be wanting test compeltion forms

testing and filling the forms in isnt the problem

its what forms do i need to fill in without been niceic:confused:

as the lad i was subcontracting for would sign the forms off after i had filled them in;)

but with me not been NIC (YET) is the any other forms i can get/fill which will be ok for building control to pass:confused:
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
In a word, no.

In order to self certify you must belong to one of the scheme providers.

I suggest maybe you get booked on an update course and enroll on a scheme.

Until then, you will have to pay your LABC for them to so the inspection and tests on your installs.

The fees for this service range from are to area but is usually £100+ and is payable upfront.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
F

finn

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
In a word, no.

In order to self certify you must belong to one of the scheme providers.

I suggest maybe you get booked on an update course and enroll on a scheme.

Until then, you will have to pay your LABC for them to so the inspection and ests on your installs.

The fees for this service range from are to area but is usually £100+ and is payable upfront.

LABC :confused:
does this mean my local certified contractor:confused:

which is the best scheme provider, i have been lookiing thru prevous posts and there's mixed views

i am in the northeast, dont no if it matters:confused:

or and thanks jason;)
 
local authority building control;)

all the schemes have their plus and minus points, you need to decide whats best for you.

my local authority lets you sign off work through them on green forms for £50 + vat but other areas charge from £100 + the thieving barstewards:eek:
 
Wetroom Store - Network Wetroom Suppliers
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to going self employed in the Business Related area at ElectriciansForums.net

Top Bottom