Discuss Gas Cooker Electrical sockets in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

G

gavlar

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HI

i have installed a new gas cooker in my kitchen,

the previous cooker i had was plugged into a cooker socket ( with iso switch) at normal height

the cable came from the back off the cooker , ran alongside the worktop then simply plugged into the cooker socket.

now ,

directly behind the cooker , i have a blanking plate,

after removing this, i found there to be a 240v ( isloated switch first but defo 240 present when switched on)

im thinking why is there a blanking plate been installed here ?

couldnt i have just installed a single a socket instead of the blanking plate , and just plugged my cooker in there ?

surley this is safer than running the cooker cable along the worksurface and pluging into the cooker socket?

im just wondering if the regs say that we are not allowed a socket so close to gas pipe connections :?

any info would be good

thanks all
 
S

sambotc

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
I think your cooker should have been hard wired into the 'blank plate' at the back. The switch above is required so that you can then isolate the cooker without the need to pull the cooker out.

The plug on your gas cooker will just be for the ignition and display etc, but the connection in behind the cooker will no doubt be rated for an electric cooker (45amps ish) which you couldn't put through a socket front. You would be better off chopping the plug off and wiring it in behind to save having a cable draped across the worktop.
 

Des 56

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Arms
Esteemed
Your good for "go" by your description, as long as the earth loop impedance to the outlet is within limits
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
that blank will be where a CCU was. ther cable there will probably be 6mm. just fix a single socket in place of the CCU and plug in tour cooker. ssimpless.
 

Is that a gas or building reg Davey?
 

snowhead

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Mentor
BS 6891:2005 Installation of low pressure gas pipework in domestic premises, clause 8.16.2 states that gas installation pipes must be spaced at least 150mm away from electricity meters, controls, electrical switches or sockets, distribution boards or consumer units. There should also be a separation between a supply or distribution cable of at least 25mm for domestic pipework up to 35mm or 50mm for pipework over 35mm.
 
S

sambotc

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
Unless the gas pipe is protected by a non conductive material!

Its stupid regulation mind.
 
Thank SH I thought it was as the regs now refer to BS 6891 in reg 528.3.4
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
if the gas pipe is too close to the electrical otlet, there are 2 options.

1. get the gas fitter to refit the gas pipe away from the existing electrical point. (that he should not have gone close to)'

2. get the hammer out.
 
G

gavlar

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Hi guys ,

thanks for all your useful informtion.

i understand now that because my cooker is gas , it will not draw a lot of current , therefore i can replace this blank plate with a single gang socket , and plug straight in.

all i requre electrically is the oven light, igniton , and digi display

im now aware that the setup i have catered for a full electric cooker.


Thanks again
 

DaveyD

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Arms
Is that a gas or building reg Davey?
Gas - sorry for the delay - you have it now I see.
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
yes. what you need to realise is that although you have a circuit capable of supplying , say, 40A, the MCB in the CU is to protect the cable ( 6mm), and the plug top fuse protects the flex to the cooker. it would be no detriment, however , to reduce the rating of the MCB to suit the load, i.e. 16A or 10A. obviously, this would need to be uprated back if an all electric cooker requiring 32A were to be fitted in the future.
 
I think your cooker should have been hard wired into the 'blank plate' at the back. The switch above is required so that you can then isolate the cooker without the need to pull the cooker out.

The plug on your gas cooker will just be for the ignition and display etc, but the connection in behind the cooker will no doubt be rated for an electric cooker (45amps ish) which you couldn't put through a socket front. You would be better off chopping the plug off and wiring it in behind to save having a cable draped across the worktop.
IMO contrary to the above post.
Don't chop the plug off and hard wire it. The manufacturer will want the internal wiring of your gas cooker protected by a 3 or 5amp fuse. (probably) Thats why it comes with a plug top on. As said by others, change the blank plate (or more likely, cooker connection unit) for a single socket and plug the gas oven in. Don't forget to loop test the new socket outlet as a minimum test.
 
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