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tedglen2

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Hello all.

I have goggled filling T&E with plaster and there are a lot of responses saying plaster will corrode the cable?

Is this just a myth? Will I be ok to just clip the cables then plaster over myself!
 
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O

Octopus

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Hello all.

I have goggled filling T&E with plaster and there are a lot of responses saying plaster will corrode the cable?

Is this just a myth? Will I be ok to just clip the cables then plaster over myself!
So have you consulted your electrician or is he a figment of your imagination?
 
T

tedglen2

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  • #4
He said plaster... just checking, because you never know if your dealing with a cowboy. Murdoch, there is no need to be a cocky **** now is there ?
 
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Swicade

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  • #5
Render or Multibond first then plaster for a smoother finish.....a thick depth of just plaster tends to shrink and crack.

I would always advise a qualified sparks checks any cableing first to make sure everything is correct before filling in as it prevents the possibilty of haveing to re-plaster when forms are being filled in due to faulty circuits.
 
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tedglen2

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
thank you - So rerender will also not effect the cable ?
 
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Swicade

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
not 100% sure meself but from reading other threads seems to be no problem.......unfortunately i'm one of those sparks that still uses capping as personal preference to just clipping, though the regs say capping isn't necessary (hard to teach and old dog new tricks i guess).
 
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SPARTYKUS

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
agreed capping looks nice but if wall being dot and dabbed (95% of time for me) I don't bother. Chases in existing walls, well, the capping is there to stop the spreads trowel (hence plastic capping) and its in a 'cut' in the wall so it's protected.

BUT I agree capping, done with skill and pride, looks best.
 
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tedglen2

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
can anyone recoment what multibond to use ? where can i buy
 
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sjm

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Although highly unlikely, it's my understanding that render is thought to be potentially destructive to PVC sheathing of T+E. So directly in plaster is OK but if installing in render use capping/conduit or other mechanical protection.
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
Ted, if you are ready to plaster than I am presuming that all the cables are in? This would be an ideal time to get the first fix tested for continuity and an insulation resistance test carried out.

This is where wago connectors work a treat:thumbsup
 
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tedglen2

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
not ready for testing, just thinking ahead really !!!
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
not ready for testing, just thinking ahead really !!!
Inspection and testing should be carried out before, during and on completion of works. It saves getting to completion and finding a fault. It is possible to find faults on new cable or for unknown mishaps to occur during installation. If you're thinking plaster and the first fix is not complete then it sounds like you may be jumping the gun ;)
 
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tedglen2

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19
yep i am jumping the gun. i always worry about future problems !!!
 
K

KFH

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
Long ago in days of yore it was recommended that cables be capped. The Electricity Board inspector was liable to take an accessory off and see if the cables were loose (capped) or fixed (plastered) and I am told would refuse to connect if not capped (mine were always capped so never found out if this was true). I am told the cable sheath is now resistant to plaster and that used not be the case with the original PVC sheath. So bury in plaster, but I still prefer to cap them even in a chase.
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #21
yep i am jumping the gun. i always worry about future problems !!!
Being prepared is one thing but giving your attention to other areas of concern whilst carrying out electrical installation will catch you out. Electrics is all about working methodically so once you have proven continuity and IR THEN you can think about plaster. If you are going to cap cables then the testing will need to occur after this because it is possible to nip a cable in the process. If plastering direct then you will still need to use cable clips on the cable to secure them to the wall. If you do not do this then the cables will keep bouncing off the wall and probably end up being visible after you have plastered.

One thing I would add is, get that ****ing sparky in to help/advise you appropriately. Regardless of what you are paying him for his services he will be responsible for the entire installation of the circuit/s if he is signing it off!
 
D

Deleted member 9648

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  • #22
The main reason for capping is to protect the cables from mechanical damage during the process of plastering....not from the plaster itself.
 
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Dave 85

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  • #24
Ted, if you are ready to plaster than I am presuming that all the cables are in? This would be an ideal time to get the first fix tested for continuity and an insulation resistance test carried out.

This is where wago connectors work a treat:thumbsup
Testing before 2nd fix eh? That's a new one. Total and utter waste of time IMO
 
So now we know who tedglen really is. Do you honestly think you should be helping sparkies out at 92 years old Phil?
Put your feet up man just like you've done since the end of the war:)
 
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tedglen2

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #29
lol - I have a lot of chasing to do
 
O

Octopus

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  • #31
Murdoch, there is no need to be a cocky **** now is there ?
There is absolutely no need for such a response like that. Your sequence of posts has consistently suggested that you have an electrician on the job but I'd venture to suggest thats not true.

For the record I'm not being cocky. This is the electricians forum for professional electricians who pay sums to be registered, insured, have the relevent qualifications, experience and tools - which you seem intent on abusing. Its not the B&Q or Wickes forum.
 
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tedglen2

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #32
I do not like you attitude. I have electrician on board but I was concerned when I read somewhere that plaster affects cable. I was trusting your opinions more than an one electrician who may or may not be a cowboy
 
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gigawatt

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #34
There's another reason for capping, not electric but will help the plastering finish. When simply plastering over cable you can leave gaps, hairline gaps which can become cracks or weak points in the plastering.

doesnt apply to dot and dab obviously.
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #35
Testing before 2nd fix eh? That's a new one. Total and utter waste of time IMO
Really?

So you trust that once you've completed your first fix everything is spot on? How do you know that? Do you not make mistakes?

I ALWAYS test for continuity/IR on the circuits I have installed on completion of first fix so that I know 100% when I return any faults have been caused by kitchen fitters or additional works that have taken place since first fix completion.

The use of wago lever connectors make this an absolute doddle and for how long the test take I think it's worth it's weight in gold.

Inspection and testing should be performed before, during and after installation to ensure that the integrity of the circuit has not been compromised. If you're not doing it then it may well come back and bite you on the behind when the client refuses to pay for repair works required that may require ripping out cable that has since been tiled over, plastered or even had kitchen cabinets installed in front of runs.

Complete waste of time? My backside it is but hey... I'm just a Electrical Trainee so what do I know??? lol
 
In a domestic situation I class first fix as cables in, boxes sunk and fixed and capping. Second fix is accessories on, it's at this point that the testing regime kicks in for me. I appreciate your point but I think your method is a waste of time. Each to their own though, it's always interesting to get another's point of view
 

Des 56

-
Arms
Esteemed
I have to admit,if I stripped a cable to test it,I would be too tempted to shove the front on,the second fix would be done before the plasterer had got his trowel out

Can't fault anyone doing things to the book,it just isn't me

By the way Ted,whats with insulting Murdoch,a well respected member ?
 
R

RISElectrical

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #39
Testing after first fix is pointless to an extent, when cables are installed you should be confident that all is good. Its after first fix and before second fix that things go wrong, plasterers damage cables, etc etc. So agree with trev above
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #40
Testing after first fix is pointless to an extent, when cables are installed you should be confident that all is good
To an extent I totally agree because results I have recorded have always been satisfactory. However, anyone can be confident that the work they complete is all good but having test results confirm this secures that confidence and provides you with proof should any damage occur at a later date.

I guess it depends at what point second fix is completed? The second fixes I have done have always been completed after plastering, tiling and kitchen units have been fixed and as mentioned this is where the damage can be caused :thumbsup
 
J

Johnny-G

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #41
Not sure why any of you guys bother replying to this lad, he's obviously just taking the ****.
 

snowhead

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Mentor
Plastering directly onto cables was unheard of when I started.
All cables were always fully capped, as much for mechanical protection afterwards as well as during plastering.

I've drilled thousands of holes in walls with capped cable, never used a detector (not that they were originally available) and never drilled thro' one before, you only had to tap the plaster and you can find the capping.

If capping is not mandatory then it would seem now that Rcd circuits have become the norm that traditional mechanical protection is no longer required.
I thought RCD was intended to be a second defence not a first.
 
P

Plonker 3

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #44
Capping is only used for protection from damage before being covered (by plaster etc). Afterwards it provides very little protection from a nail and hammer or drill.
 

imago

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Arms
Esteemed
With regard to capping, I still use it partly out of habit, and partly because it looks better to the customer if they see the runs prior to plastering. It really doesn't add anything in terms of protection except from the platerer's trowel as previously mentioned.

As for testing cables run in, or first fix if you like then sometimes I do and sometimes I don't. I'm not keen on the 'I always' approach to some aspects of the work as almost every job is different. So for example, if I do a first fix and then leave the job to be followed in by other trades I test the first fix. Alternatively, if I first fix then my plasterer covers the cables over and I second fix behind him then I don't test at first fix.

We all have our habits, preferences, work orders and routines, but to only work in one set way on every job isn't the best approach. That's just my opinion though :)
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #46
I agree, there will be instances where there is minimal risk. However, I like the reassurance that what I have carried out is all correct and in order. I would be so embarrassed if it turned out there was a fault that I was to blame for. It wouldn't look very professional so for the amount of time it takes I am happy to continue as I do :)

The same said for alterations to existing circuits, I always test before I commence work to ensure that there are no existing faults that I could get the blame for. Any faults that are found on the initial test are rectified before I carry out my alterations/additions and then I test my own work again afterwards to ensure that what I have done has not impaired the integrity of the circuit in any way shape or form.

Confidence is one thing, reassurance through the proof of testing is another. I didn't fork out hundreds of pounds on a tester to not put it to maximum use :D

Nice to hear the views of others regarding this :D:D:D
 
M

moospark

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #47
P.V.C capping is not deemed mechanical protection under 17th. Personally I think it often looks like a cover up, even of a job well done. Rather see a bit of good honest, neat and tidy clipped direct, any day.
 
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Guest55

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #48
Recent scientific studies have shown plaster can eat though cable insulation in seconds.
I strongly recommend you leave your wall chases left bare and exposed for all eternity.
God i hope things pick up on the forum tonite.
 
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Dave 85

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #49
Really?

So you trust that once you've completed your first fix everything is spot on? How do you know that? Do you not make mistakes? If you mean do I put nails straight through my cables when fixing capping then no. Never. I do not burn cables either whilst pulling through joists. The only IR test failures I have ever experienced on new work are due to wires pinned or nicked by screwing the faceplate back or cable damage that can quite easily be traced back to a kitchen unit fixing. Any continuity test fails I get are due to me forgetting to put a faceplate on somewhere.

I ALWAYS test for continuity/IR on the circuits I have installed on completion of first fix so that I know 100% when I return any faults have been caused by kitchen fitters or additional works that have taken place since first fix completion.

The use of wago lever connectors make this an absolute doddle and for how long the test take I think it's worth it's weight in gold.

Inspection and testing should be performed before, during and after installation to ensure that the integrity of the circuit has not been compromised. I do testing during and after installation...ie when im putting the CU on after 2nd fix and then live testing once its done. If you're not doing it then it may well come back and bite you on the behind when the client refuses to pay for repair works required that may require ripping out cable that has since been tiled over, plastered or even had kitchen cabinets installed in front of runs. Never caused me any problems so far during my 7 year electrical career. And I've probably saved what? 200+ hours by not first fix testing since I've been self employed, so thats, say £5000 worth of labour already, so if I have to pay a spread £50 to re skim a bit of wall one day, well....its not the end of the world.

Complete waste of time? Yes and it appears im not the only one who thinks so My backside it is but hey... I'm just a Electrical Trainee so what do I know??? lol Whats this supposed to mean? are you being serious? or are you suggesting im a Electrical Trainee?
Its been a long day.
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #50
Its been a long day.
Ha ha ha, no I am most definitely not implying that you are a Electrical Trainee, that would be most inappropriate as I am not aware of your back ground. I was stating that this is the route I followed to enter the trade albeit working alongside a spark at the time.

Everyone has their own method, I am more than happy with mine and seems you are happy with yours. Whilst I can understand what others say about my method being a waste of time this is the way I work and it is because I am always looking to cover my arse and know 100% that all is sound because at the end of the day we are all human and humans make mistakes fact!

I understand also the point you make about time however the tests take next to no time at all and I have proof on my sheet that I can use should the occasion arise where a fault is discovered and the owner/ kitchen fitter/builder or whoever tries to pull a fast one:thumbsup
 
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Guest55

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #51
Doing insulations tests before final connections are made - is it worth while ?
Of course it bloody is.
bs 7671 testing guidance advises the testing is done during construction
The problem is most posters view scenarios purely from a domestic perspective.
During my stint doing highways power on motorways all cables are tested instantly after being pulled in because the cost of putting out a lane closure to sort out an unchecked problem costs thousands.
Same with large commercial projects - no point waiting till the jobs finished to do all the testing , theres just to much.
 
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Dave 85

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #52
Ha ha ha, no I am most definitely not implying that you are a Electrical Trainee, that would be most inappropriate as I am not aware of your back ground. I was stating that this is the route I followed to enter the trade albeit working alongside a spark at the time.

Everyone has their own method, I am more than happy with mine and seems you are happy with yours. Whilst I can understand what others say about my method being a waste of time this is the way I work and it is because I am always looking to cover my arse and know 100% that all is sound because at the end of the day we are all human and humans make mistakes fact!

I understand also the point you make about time however the tests take next to no time at all and I have proof on my sheet that I can use should the occasion arise where a fault is discovered and the owner/ kitchen fitter/builder or whoever tries to pull a fast one:thumbsup
Cool, sorry about that, there are a couple of guys on here who regularly like to refer to me as a Electrical Trainee. Personally I have no issue with people who have taken this method of training and think that, with the neccesary experience, its perfectly suitable for people doing mainly domestic electrical work. Sorry if my posts come across a little aggresive at times. But seriously, its worthing thinking about which risks are worthing taking and which arn't. It can save you hours.

I've had two occasions where an RFC cable has been screwed by a kitchen fitter and both times I mangaged to locate the fault and replace the cable (via a different route) within an hour or so. No mess, no fuss, no units down. Theres always the last resort option of disconnecting the damaged leg of the ring (if its near the middle of the circuit) and creating 2 20 amp radials instead.
 
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1shortcircuit

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #53
Cool, sorry about that, there are a couple of guys on here who regularly like to refer to me as a Electrical Trainee. Personally I have no issue with people who have taken this method of training and think that, with the neccesary experience, its perfectly suitable for people doing mainly domestic electrical work. Sorry if my posts come across a little aggresive at times. But seriously, its worthing thinking about which risks are worthing taking and which arn't. It can save you hours.

I've had two occasions where an RFC cable has been screwed by a kitchen fitter and both times I mangaged to locate the fault and replace the cable (via a different route) within an hour or so. No mess, no fuss, no units down. Theres always the last resort option of disconnecting the damaged leg of the ring (if its near the middle of the circuit) and creating 2 20 amp radials instead.
The problem with written text is you cannot judge the tone of voice being used in a conversation to evaluate which way of many that it is meant ;)

As mentioned, you are happy. I am happy... together we are all happy :) I'm certainly not going to argue over it because it's only my name that goes on my certs and my reputation at stake. I am much less experienced than many on here I am sure which is why my method works for me too. Sometimes I get disturbed by clients or telephone calls which "Could" distract me so by testing at this stage I am able to address any fault that may arise due to whatever reason.

:thumbsup
 
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SPARTYKUS

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #54
That oval conduit is better than capping. Ahem.
 
I always use oval conduit. Love the protection it offers, along with the fact that it allows for new cables if they ever get damaged.
Had a job a couple of months ago where a new socket was needed and when I checked, the nearest outlet was already a spur. Luckily there was conduit, so converted to part of the RFC.
I've lost count of the number of times I need to make alterations or carry out a rewire and say "thank you" when I find the whole place has conduit installed.

Btw, render affects the cable sheath, plaster doesn't.
 
B

Ben Grant

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #56
I'm picking up a general consensus that cables don't need to be in capping or conduit...

May I say I don't like cables being in the wall without "basic protection" yes there is a tick box on the schedule of items inspected on both an Electrical installation certificate and an electrical installation condition report to say that the " basic protection" has been met.

Additional protection to cables buried in thermally insulated walls buried less than 50mm from the surface needs to have "additional protection" by means of an RCD on the circuit. This is not an excuse for not putting oval conduit or capping on or over your cables. Both scenarios need to be met with basic protection by means of oval conduit or capping and then if it is in a thermally insulated wall (chased or dob and dabbed) that it be additionally protected with RCD.

You only get what you pay for, good spark = basic protection and additional protection (guy that has spent some time in school and on site), average joe spark = RCD the lot

Correct me please if im wrong...
 
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Swicade

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #57
Agree with most of what you say there Ben Grant except:

'You only get what you pay for, good spark = basic protection and additional protection (guy that has spent some time in school and on site), average joe spark = RCD the lot'

As stated many (usualy the older hands) still use capping/conduit...it's how we where always taught BUT rules have now made it optional....doesn't make someone an average or bad sparks just because they dont do it the old way does it?
 
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SPARTYKUS

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #58
As above Ben Grant I'm not sure you fully appreciate that the only reason capping is used is to protect cables from a plasterers trowel, where NEEDED !
 

Des 56

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Arms
Esteemed
May I say I don't like cables being in the wall without "basic protection"

My cables are usually covered in insulation
:cool:


 
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Plonker 3

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #60
I'm picking up a general consensus that cables don't need to be in capping or conduit...

May I say I don't like cables being in the wall without "basic protection" yes there is a tick box on the schedule of items inspected on both an Electrical installation certificate and an electrical installation condition report to say that the " basic protection" has been met.

Additional protection to cables buried in thermally insulated walls buried less than 50mm from the surface needs to have "additional protection" by means of an RCD on the circuit. This is not an excuse for not putting oval conduit or capping on or over your cables. Both scenarios need to be met with basic protection by means of oval conduit or capping and then if it is in a thermally insulated wall (chased or dob and dabbed) that it be additionally protected with RCD.

You only get what you pay for, good spark = basic protection and additional protection (guy that has spent some time in school and on site), average joe spark = RCD the lot

Correct me please if im wrong...
BS7671 Definitions.

Basic protection= Protection against electric shock under fault-free conditions. So capping has nothing to do with this what so ever.
 
Ben, as Dillb says, capping has nothing to do with "basic protection". I think you are misunderstanding the meaning altogether.
 
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Edd

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #62
May I say I don't like cables being in the wall without "basic protection" yes there is a tick box on the schedule of items inspected on both an Electrical installation certificate and an electrical installation condition report to say that the " basic protection" has been met.
I think you may have been ticking that box without understanding BS7671's definition of basic protection!
 

snowhead

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Mentor
BS7671 Definitions.

Basic protection= Protection against electric shock under fault-free conditions. So capping has nothing to do with this what so ever.
So basic protection is the cable insulation?

It doesn't even need to be double insulated, that means singles clipped to a wall, no capping and plastered is O.K.

.
 
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Plonker 3

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #64
Yes but it is for all insulation on the circuit form the cable insulation to enclosures to socket fronts etc. In laymans terms no live parts can be accessed anywhere on the circuit if there is no fault on it.
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #65
He said plaster... just checking, because you never know if your dealing with a cowboy. Murdoch, there is no need to be a cocky **** now is there ?
Murdoch`s alrite....thank god i didn`t reply to that question fella...
 
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SPARTYKUS

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #66
Murdoch? He's a top chap, even for a wine merchant.

(just kidding).

Fix Bayonets!!
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #67
So basic protection is the cable insulation?

It doesn't even need to be double insulated, that means singles clipped to a wall, no capping and plastered is O.K.

.
capping is not considered as additional protection....its there purely to stop plasterers (rough gits) from cutting into our cables with their trowels...
 
B

Ben Grant

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #68
Put capping in don't put capping in. All the pictures on google I have seen have been with capping/conduit. Don't wanna put it in... Then don't, I get a better sense of pride when it's there, separates the men from the boys
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #69
Put capping in don't put capping in. All the pictures on google I have seen have been with capping/conduit. Don't wanna put it in... Then don't, I get a better sense of pride when it's there, separates the men from the boys
well if the walls are to be dry-lined then PVC/metal channel isn`t really necessary is it....you look at the job in hand first to assess what needs doing....then go with that....its the same for most things isn`t it....
 
All I can reiterate is "Thank god for the electricians who used oval conduit 30 years ago". Saves me a world of pain when I start on a rewire :)
 
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sparks1973

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  • #73
All I can reiterate is "Thank god for the electricians who used oval conduit 30 years ago". Saves me a world of pain when I start on a rewire :)
well this is it....having the foresight to see that the install they did had a finite lifespan.....
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #75
you can still get oval conduit of course......its just with costs being more at the forefront of peoples mind nowadays.......i mean look at the first thing out of their mouths...
`how much?`
 
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SPARTYKUS

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #76
All I can reiterate is "Thank god for the electricians who used oval conduit 30 years ago". Saves me a world of pain when I start on a rewire :)
You want to find the bloke that did it 30 years ago and buy him a pint.
 
you can still get oval conduit of course......its just with costs being more at the forefront of peoples mind nowadays.......i mean look at the first thing out of their mouths...
`how much?`
Sparks, I find that it's only when subbin out to builders you get the "how much?" exclamation.
Usually, when I do rewires for people, it's because they want ME to do the job and trust that I do is what I consider necessary. I sometimes give people a "budget" version which cuts back on some of the luxuries, but I always stress that I use MK/Crabtree gear because it is good quality, LineProducts MF gear because it complies with regs, and my own level of perfectionism, which definitely ends up taking more time.
If they want cheap, then I wish them luck.
Push professionalism, not price.

I do, of course, acknowledge that living in an area with a high number of elderly people who "want it done right, like the old days", makes the quality aspect much easier to stress.
 
So basic protection is the cable insulation?

It doesn't even need to be double insulated, that means singles clipped to a wall, no capping and plastered is O.K.

.
I think you mean insulated and sheathed :)

412.2.4.1 states that along with basic protection, wiring systems must have adequate mechanical protection. This can be in the form of the sheath. Hope this makes sense.
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #80
I think you mean insulated and sheathed :)

412.2.4.1 states that along with basic protection, wiring systems must have adequate mechanical protection. This can be in the form of the sheath. Hope this makes sense.
correct...umpteen times i`v heard sheathing being refered to as insulation...it isnt.....its there to protect thi insulation underneath...
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #84
It's as protective as a cable sheath.:devilish:
well sod it then...lets get the singles out and just clip em direct....swipe a bit of thistle over em....there!..jobs a gud un....
:cowboy:
 
E

Edd

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #85
Bit confused here,is it that people think that the capping is mechanical protection? It is in a sence but only for the plasterer who will dig into the cables.

But,, I think the mechanical protection reg is there for the people who think clipping Twin and Earths around a workshop is fine.

So as above, the plaster would indeed be mechanical protection. But as long as its us who carfully fill the chase for the plasterer then to skim over.

Note this is one example of a book load, I know we all read things diffrent.
 
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sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #86
Bit confused here,is it that people think that the capping is mechanical protection? It is in a sence but only for the plasterer who will dig into the cables.

But,, I think the mechanical protection reg is there for the people who think clipping Twin and Earths around a workshop is fine.

So as above, the plaster would indeed be mechanical protection. But as long as its us who carfully fill the chase for the plasterer then to skim over.

Note this is one example of a book load, I know we all read things diffrent.
well the thing is n all Edd....just clipping flat twin direct in a workshop is/was one of the scenarios given for the 2391...a double garage being used as a lawnmower repair shop i think......
 
Bit confused here,is it that people think that the capping is mechanical protection? It is in a sence but only for the plasterer who will dig into the cables.

But,, I think the mechanical protection reg is there for the people who think clipping Twin and Earths around a workshop is fine.

So as above, the plaster would indeed be mechanical protection. But as long as its us who carfully fill the chase for the plasterer then to skim over.

Note this is one example of a book load, I know we all read things diffrent.
The T&E sheath is simple "mechanical protection", which is why it is ok to surface mount T&E. If you are talking about specific mechanical protection, such as steel conduit, or "suitable for environment", then that is a whole different ball-game.
I think you are right Edd, some people do think that capping serves as mechanical protection....
I honestly don't think there is much to misinterpret here if you read the BGB. :)
 
S

sparks1973

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  • #88
they were running convection heaters of it...therer was no additional protection by means of RCD....just a few of the baddies as far as i can remember....
 
S

sparks1973

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #90
The T&E sheath is simple "mechanical protection", which is why it is ok to surface mount T&E. If you are talking about specific mechanical protection, such as steel conduit, or "suitable for environment", then that is a whole different ball-game.
I think you are right Edd, some people do think that capping serves as mechanical protection....
I honestly don't think there is much to misinterpret here if you read the BGB. :)
well a schedule of inspections has a box for `selection of equipment and protective measures suitable to external influences`....now obviously this doesn`t mean outdoors.....although that is also sometimes the case.....
 
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