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Discuss Understanding the new regulation regarding Main Bonding. in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

happyhippydad

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Arms
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Regulation 411.3.1.2 states ....

Main bonding conductors shall connect to the main earthing terminal extraneous conductive parts.

It then goes on to say...

'Metallic pipes entering the building having an insulating section at their point of entry need not be connected to the protective equipotential bonding'.

Lets say we have a water pipe coming into the house in the plastic blue pipe, from then on its metal. The above reg makes me believe this does not need Main bonding, is that correct?

The above reg does not suggest we test the water pipe to see if it extraneous. It just says we have to bond extraneous parts, then it says not to bond if they come in to the house in an insulating section.

If we do test the water pipe it is likely that it will test at 1 or 2 ohms to earth (probably as it is usually connected to earth somewhere within the premises). Does this reg still imply not to bond in this case when we can clearly see an insulating section at point of entry?
 
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GBDamo

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Supporter
That's how I read it.

plastic coming in, all plastic pipe work = no bond
plastic coming in, all metallic pipe work = no bond
metal coming in, immediately to plastic or a section of = no bond
metal coming in, immediately metallic pipework = bond

This doesn't however mean that pipework that enters in plastic doesn't at some point revert to metal and then creates an extraneous path which may or may not need bonding.

hope that clears it up for you.
 

Charlie_

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Arms
Same with oil pipes, there’re usually insulated and then we bond at a concealed section.
Incoming Gas pipes are usually insulated
How will a section of insulation stop it from being extraneous??
 
Same with oil pipes, there’re usually insulated and then we bond at a concealed section.
Incoming Gas pipes are usually insulated
How will a section of insulation stop it from being extraneous??
Exactly,who makes these regs,plastic makes it not extraneous.
 

ChrisElectrical88

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Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
As you have mentioned already, measure resistance to MET from metallic pipework. <22Kohms = bond.
Exactly this, belts and braces this way and your not just seeing a section of plastic and saying no bond. Obviously make sure parellel patha are disconnected first.

Made a post about a month ago on this when i was undecided. Metal coming in streight onto a plastic section then back to metal after the stoptap to the rest of the house. Didnt bond it as the IR reading from the MET to consumer side of the stoptap was around 30k.
 

buzzlightyear

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Arms
Esteemed
That's how I read it.

plastic coming in, all plastic pipe work = no bond
plastic coming in, all metallic pipe work = no bond
metal coming in, immediately to plastic or a section of = no bond
metal coming in, immediately metallic pipework = bond

This doesn't however mean that pipework that enters in plastic doesn't at some point revert to metal and then creates an extraneous path which may or may not need bonding.

hope that clears it up for you.
I'm glad some one cleared that up thanks Geronimo :)
 

Pete999

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Arms
Esteemed
No mate he had an Apache on his head, and ut wasn't his own hair never had Head and Shoulders in those days.
 
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