Bulk Workwear - Clothing Suppliers for the Whole Forum Network
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss cables to sockets in the Industrial Electrician Talk area at ElectriciansForums.net

D

Dee

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

Can anyone help? We are planning to lay another layer of plasterboard in our kitchen and then plaster; we are leaving sockets where they are just replacing fronts but need to be able to sit in new plasterboard which will make depth approx 30mm deeper than now, can anyone suggest way of lengthening cable as existing cable does not have enough play to pull forward. Many thanks.
 
uHeat Banner - Forum Discount Available
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
S

Shakey

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
Can anyone help? We are planning to lay another layer of plasterboard in our kitchen and then plaster; we are leaving sockets where they are just replacing fronts but need to be able to sit in new plasterboard which will make depth approx 30mm deeper than now, can anyone suggest way of lengthening cable as existing cable does not have enough play to pull forward. Many thanks.
well the standard way to lengthen them would be using crimps

And before everyone starts about 'safe isolation', 'notifiable work in kitchens' etc etc, I am saying HOW he could do it, I am not saying he SHOULD:rolleyes:
 
D

Dee

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Thank you sharkey. Maybe being a bit thick (typical blond)!, but is this something a qualified electrician should do then? and will it need a certificate? I wouldnt consider doing this myself as i dont know my live from my earth :eek: but my partner does. i just want to make sure we are doing things the safest way if we dont have to use qualified electrician.

oops, sorry shakey, not sharkey.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
W

wattsup

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Well if 30mm short the original spark left them short, but loads of sparks do that. Me I would just extend using connectors if major probs involved getting the length required and no realistic alternative.
Just to get on shakey's nerves I would never crimp solid drawn copper cable, use connectors but let a spark do it, don't diy the connections.
 
D

Dee

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
thanks wattsup, sounds like it can be done then, just not by no-prof, i will call electrician tomorrow.
 
S

Spudmiester

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
Crimps V connectors, this could go on and on.............

Myself I would use crimps just to get on Wattsups nerves.

I think we covered all this a month or two back !
 
S

Shakey

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Well if 30mm short the original spark left them short, but loads of sparks do that. Me I would just extend using connectors if major probs involved getting the length required and no realistic alternative.
Just to get on shakey's nerves I would never crimp solid drawn copper cable, use connectors but let a spark do it, don't diy the connections.
ha ha here we go again

I am presuming that the joint will be behind the box, so available for inspection, maintenance etc.;)

Crimps are a recognised and acceptable method of extending / joining cables.

The EAL Domestic Installers course (as an example) which I teach specifically requires to the student to extend a cable using crimps.:rolleyes:

*can open*
*worms out*

again......:p
 

ian.settle1

-
Mentor
Arms
What size plaster board are you using that it will be 30mm deeper?

Standard plaster board is 12mm thick with a skim coating on top will make it 15mm max possibly.
 
Last edited:
M

montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
again im with wattsup on this one :)
 
N

No.15

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Crimps! As told on VRQ Level 2 Domestic Electrical Installer Part P course - the question came up on one of the many assessments we had to take.
 
M

montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Crimps! As told on VRQ Level 2 Domestic Electrical Installer Part P course - the question came up on one of the many assessments we had to take.
doesnt make it right though, always been taught (along with many very experienced electricians and electrical engineers) that crimping solid core cable is bad practice.
 
C

Carter

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Don't crimp solids unless absolutely no other get out such as to lift a board above to get a few inches slack, or sometimes possible to "bring the mountain to mohammad" by repositioning the socket a few inches, replace the offending leg/s. Recognized or not, it just doesnt 'feel' right to me even though I know that when properly applied they will correctly deform the conductor and if properly done you couldn't seperate the joint even by hauling on it! I've also in my time come across crimps that looked like they were done by belting them with a pair of stones. That's my tuppence worth.

Mind you I'm the sort who wherever possible puts bootlace crimps on any flex terminations to FCUs and spur units out of habit, alright, AND because I like the noise my gucci 'Pressmaster' ratchet crimper makes! Phwooaar:rolleyes:
 
M

montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
I've also in my time come across crimps that looked like they were done by belting them with a pair of stones.
pmsl:D

Totally agree on bootlace ferrules too!
 
D

Dee

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Ok, maybe i have over estimated on the thickness, well i am a woman! :D

Shall i do some by crimping and the others by connectors, at least that way i will have some of it right, and it might stop u lot arguing lol. Thank u all anyway.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
R

rumrunner

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
If yer origional sparks left them so short then if i couldnt pull any slack i would rewire the whole lot,one socket might be a mistake,but all of them ?,rip it all out and start again,and crimping solid core cables is in my opinion [email protected] and as ive said before it used to say on the packet "only to be used on stranded cables,connectors would be better but i wouldnt do it
have fun
 
S

Shakey

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
If yer origional sparks left them so short then if i couldnt pull any slack i would rewire the whole lot,one socket might be a mistake,but all of them ?,rip it all out and start again,and crimping solid core cables is in my opinion [email protected] and as ive said before it used to say on the packet "only to be used on stranded cables,connectors would be better but i wouldnt do it
have fun
hurrah!

I was waiting for the mighty Rum with his 'rewire the world' morals:D

Crimps ARE a recognised method of joining cables.

I have a very good ratchet crimping tool. You will not seperate the conductors afterwards. And in the ideal world, there would be no junction boxes, no crimps, no connectors, nothing to fail or break.

Then we can all go home and have tea and crumpets.

Would you run a lighting supply cable THROUGH a back box, without connecting it, just as a convenient route? The regs say you can, and it may not feel right, but think about, why not? what would the danger be?

And why not use a perfectly good crimp connection that is suited to the task it has been selected for?:rolleyes:
 
M

montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
Just what I have always had drummed into me and it would be very difficult for me to go against that
 

benji

-
Arms
why plasterboard ,get a decent plasterer to re-skim the walls they can't be that bad
benji
 
B

Bane

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19
Now she's just confused.
 
CK Tools :) The professionals choice when it comes to Electrical Tools
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Reply to cables to sockets in the Industrial Electrician Talk area at ElectriciansForums.net

Electrical2Go - Online Electrical Supplier
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom