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Discuss Crimper manual/hydraulic hex/indent? in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

davesparks

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As we're getting more and more work with larger supplies requiring crimped lugs I'm looking at buying a bigger crimper instead of hiring. I'm never sure that the hire ones have been looked after properly and woukd rather have something I can trust.

Trouble is I can afford a hydraulic one so are the manual ones up to scratch? I can't see any reason why the wouldn't be but thought I'd see what the vast experience of the forum has to say.
I'm looking at this hex type at the moment:
CT120h-500x500.jpg

Then I noticed that the old style indent crimper are still available, I thought they'd fallen out of use years ago for anything but solid cores, are they still a viable option?
 
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Pete999

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As we're getting more and more work with larger supplies requiring crimped lugs I'm looking at buying a bigger crimper instead of hiring. I'm never sure that the hire ones have been looked after properly and woukd rather have something I can trust.

Trouble is I can afford a hydraulic one so are the manual ones up to scratch? I can't see any reason why the wouldn't be but thought I'd see what the vast experience of the forum has to say.
I'm looking at this hex type at the moment:
View attachment 50495

Then I noticed that the old style indent crimper are still available, I thought they'd fallen out of use years ago for anything but solid cores, are they still a viable option?
Got an old BICC SET 6mm, 16mm, 25mm, 35mm,50mm, 95mm, 120mm if you want them they are FOC but need collecting from my house let me know.
 

Andy78

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I'd always go for hex pattern crimpers.
I bought some that are identical to your picture but they were pretty shoddy. Were about £12 from ebay though :rolleyes:.
The circlips that hold the die axles in fell off in a very short time resulting in the parts coming loose. I only got them for occasional bonding lugs for my domestic work, but still.

Apart from that the action of the design was very good and easy to crimp, so a better quality brand of the same design might be a good shout.
 
B

Bobster

Depends on what size you need an how often. Anything over 150mm can be a real PITA especially in a cramped environment if they are not hydraulic.

Can pick up sets up to 300mm fairly cheap nowadays <300quid. Or look into Petes offer.

I would always use hex crimps for stranded conductors.
 

Lucien Nunes

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Apart from crimping a few types of terminal that require a dedicated die set, I use two manual tools, one hex, one indent. The hex is a ratchet tool that takes dies from 10 to 120mm. I like it because it's heavily built and smooth to operate. One handle is fixed to the body so in awkward spaces you can park it in position and just push the other one repeatedly until the crimp is complete. The indent tool is adjustable from 10-95mm, single stroke type with 2' long handles.

Both are 25+ years old, can't recall where they came from although newer versions of them are still available from RS / Specialised Wiring Accs. I'm not specifically recommending them over any others, but they have served well

Thankfully mine is not in those hideous colours!
 

davesparks

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Got an old BICC SET 6mm, 16mm, 25mm, 35mm,50mm, 95mm, 120mm if you want them they are FOC but need collecting from my house let me know.
Hi Pete, that is a very kind offer Thankyou, I'll have a look at the logistics and get back to you
 

davesparks

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I would always use hex crimps for stranded conductors.
Howcome? I've been reading a few different articles and they all seem to suggest that indent are equally suitable for stranded or fine stranded as hex crimps.
And my own experience is that I've not yet come across either which have failed (apart from where some muppet has fitted oversized lugs)
 

davesparks

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Apart from crimping a few types of terminal that require a dedicated die set, I use two manual tools, one hex, one indent. The hex is a ratchet tool that takes dies from 10 to 120mm. I like it because it's heavily built and smooth to operate. One handle is fixed to the body so in awkward spaces you can park it in position and just push the other one repeatedly until the crimp is complete. The indent tool is adjustable from 10-95mm, single stroke type with 2' long handles.

Both are 25+ years old, can't recall where they came from although newer versions of them are still available from RS / Specialised Wiring Accs. I'm not specifically recommending them over any others, but they have served well

Thankfully mine is not in those hideous colours!
I've looked at the ratchet ones you mention from SWA.
What influences your decision to use hex over indent or the other way around?
 
B

Bobster

Howcome? I've been reading a few different articles and they all seem to suggest that indent are equally suitable for stranded or fine stranded as hex crimps.
And my own experience is that I've not yet come across either which have failed (apart from where some muppet has fitted oversized lugs)
Personal preference rather than a hard solid fact. I tend to use indents for large Al and solid copper conductors.

I personally feel that the cold weld process is more thorough with an all around hex style crimp.
 
D

Deleted member 26818

My experience with those hand Hex crimpers shown in the OP, is that you always have to use the size below what you are crimping.

If you do ever contemplate purchasing a hydraulic set, steer clear of Cembre.
They use some weird numbering system for the dies, which doesn’t seem to relate to anything.
 
I have bought one of the hydraulic ones from a well known auction site, I find like someone else mentioned that you have to use a size smaller than labelled. Otherwise, I was happy with the results, used for 1 job with some 70mm swa. Now rests in shed for next job in another 3years. Hence not wanting to spend on well known make.
 

stevethesparks

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My experience with those hand Hex crimpers shown in the OP, is that you always have to use the size below what you are crimping.
That may be due to the make of lug you are using?

Slightly off-topic, but I am astounded by the poor quality of items available nowadays such as brass bushes, couplers etc, the same with some tin like lugs.
 

Lucien Nunes

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What influences your decision to use hex over indent
Normally use hex for straight forward lugs onto cable ends, but in special situations inside equipment, where I want fine control over the amount of deformation e.g. because the terminal and conductor are not an ideal pairing, I use the indent.
 

Midwest

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I also bought a hydraulic hex' crimper off flea bay. Again, depending on the lugs (which came from same wholesaler), had to use lower size crimps, although I only used it a few times. It has a bit of a small oil leak (your be used to that davesparks), but still works fine and was quite cheap; most stuff is from China.

I went for hydraulic one, as it seems more suited to confine spaces. There is a bit of a knack though, 'cos its a bit heavy, which makes it difficult with fine motor muscle skills & small lug & cable.
 

davesparks

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You can get a hydraulic hex crimper on we’ll know auction site for under £25
Yes, the bloke I'm working for at the moment bought one if those and I refuse to use it. There's no sign of any calibration certificate, quality control or being made to any recognised standard. The crimp dies are also visibly of very poor quality with the shape of the hex being deformed.

In short I wouldn't put my name to a job done with such dubious tools.
 

Pete999

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Yes, the bloke I'm working for at the moment bought one if those and I refuse to use it. There's no sign of any calibration certificate, quality control or being made to any recognised standard. The crimp dies are also visibly of very poor quality with the shape of the hex being deformed.

In short I wouldn't put my name to a job done with such dubious tools.
The only calibration the ones I'm offering is the size of the muscles in your arms
 
I've got a set of those blue handled jobs. Also slightly dubious about quality.
25 and 35mm crimps work OK, but for some reason using 10mm die on 10mm lug on 10mm cable doesn't work. Have to use 6mm die, which then 'pinches' the lug a bit. Does seem to be a good connection though.
Interested in recommendations for a better quality manual hex crimper...
 

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