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Discuss Recommendations for a Voltage Indicator and Proving Unit in the Electrical Tools and Products area at ElectriciansForums.net

Julie.

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Arms
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Looked at this several times and I'm convinced this is housed in a carrot and not a pyro shroud.

Yeah it's a bit old and been sculling round the bottom of a toolbox for years!

If it was a carrot, it would be rotten by now.

I am not sure i want to test it though, how times have changed, it was the right thing to use in the 70's, now scared to use it.
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It does......
20201001_095013.jpg

1977 - 2020 and still working, take that megger/fluke/martindale
 
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PEG

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Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
....It looks like something at the bottom of a clinical waste bin,in a prostate operating theatre...
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I have the TPT320 and the older TPT220...both very good bits of kit.
 

David Prosser

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Esteemed
Arms
Patron
depends where you work and if you work for customers that have there own rules. For example we expect all our contractors to have proving units and voltage indicators that match up with each other and test up to 550v DC.
 

R-fur

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Esteemed
Arms
I have always used Drummond testers, Especially like their new LED ones. Bombproof.
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And what’s wrong with this then??
Years ago when I was an SAP with a DNO the old Clyde Valley Power Company substations had the original home made testers in them. A Plywood box with two 60W lamps in series inside, holes in the front so you could see the lamps, Substation name signwritten at the top and a special bracket on the wall to hang it on, next to the rack for spare fuses. Wish I had kept one.
 
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RDB85

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Trainee
I have always used Drummond testers, Especially like their new LED ones. Bombproof.
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Years ago when I was an SAP with a DNO the old Clyde Valley Power Company substations had the original home made testers in them. A Plywood box with two 60W lamps in series inside, holes in the front so you could see the lamps, Substation name signwritten at the top and a special bracket on the wall to hang it on, next to the rack for spare fuses. Wish I had kept one.

I’ve not seen the Drummond ones.
 

DPG

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Esteemed
Arms
Patron
Yeah it's a bit old and been sculling round the bottom of a toolbox for years!

If it was a carrot, it would be rotten by now.

I am not sure i want to test it though, how times have changed, it was the right thing to use in the 70's, now scared to use it.
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It does......
View attachment 61136

1977 - 2020 and still working, take that megger/fluke/martindale

Get it on ebay and use the words 'vintage', 'barn find' and 'industrial ' :D
 

telectrix

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Mentor
Esteemed
Arms
i bought this on ebay to replace one i lost. cheap as chips. phase sequence. does the job.
UNI-T Waterproof Type Digital 2 Pole Voltage Tester
 

pc1966

Esteemed
Arms
Supporter
The tester I have also bleeps on continuity - I hate that as I'm usually checking for safety and periodically jump then realise it a different f'ing bleep for N-E continuity and not L-N reversal and still energised!

So I would go for one that does one job only - to check for volts. If buying another I would probably go for the Drummond, or something cheap like the "Kewtech Kewvolt 2" or "Socket & See VIP150" that also needs no battery. To be fair my one still warns if volts and no battery but i think the voltage-range LEDs don't light, so would go for one that does one simple job.

However, some folk like a simple continuity probe bleeper feature for other testing, and I know some folk who like the non-contact sort for seeing if something is live, but never use them to prove dead!
 

Julie.

Esteemed
Arms
The tester I have also bleeps on continuity - I hate that as I'm usually checking for safety and periodically jump then realise it a different f'ing bleep for N-E continuity and not L-N reversal and still energised!

So I would go for one that does one job only - to check for volts. If buying another I would probably go for the Drummond, or something cheap like the "Kewtech Kewvolt 2" or "Socket & See VIP150" that also needs no battery. To be fair my one still warns if volts and no battery but i think the voltage-range LEDs don't light, so would go for one that does one simple job.

However, some folk like a simple continuity probe bleeper feature for other testing, and I know some folk who like the non-contact sort for seeing if something is live, but never use them to prove dead!
Yeah, that's one thing about the megger tpt320, it's a useful function, but inevitably take me by surprise every time!

That's just familiarity though, whatever you learn with eventually feels like the only right way.

To this day, whenever I see a black wire, my mind thinks neutral, takes me a moment to check myself!
 

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