Scolmore Electrical Products
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss smoke detectors,compulsory? in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

H

hodgey1972

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

rented accomodation,changing db,always install smokes,heats,landlord says smokes etc,are just good practice!help doing or not doing sat
 
SuperlecDirect - ElectriciansForums.net Electrical Suppliers
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

ian.settle1

-
Mentor
Arms
rented accomodation,changing db,always install smokes,heats,landlord says smokes etc,are just good practice!help doing or not doing sat
Check with the local authority as can't remember the date but rented accommadation has to be registered or something the like with them so it maybe that a fire panel or similar needs to be fitted.
 
Last edited:
T

tony.towa

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Smoke detectors are now a requirement in rented accomodation under the landlord's "duty of care" responsibilities. Similar to the requirement for communal areas in blocks of privately owned flats (leasehold) where there is a service charge paid for the maintaining of communal areas, services etc.
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Yes, but the duty of care is not law.

However, if there was a fire and fatalities or injuries then the landlord could get prosecuted.

Its his choice at the end of the day!
 
S

sparkyork

id fit em mate, its gotta be the way forward. people dying from not having smoke detection etc is unacceptable
 
H

hodgey1972

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
thanks everyone,fitting db tomorrow,**** his tenants,i dont care if they die of smoke inhallation
yeah fitted db,did periodic too,nob err client told me he 'ed done some of the wiring himself,'what the botched wiring i enquired'
'what' he said
yeah,the switches with the earth cut off,the earths without sleeving,the earths with red tape round em,the cooker switch with no earth,the shower with burnt cables
its failed, i said,you will haveto pay me to make these alterations,repairs,i said(did two hours reconnecting earths,earthing class1 fittings, sleeving etc
'well things are tight he said'his missus is a solicitor for the council
spouting part p re smokes,
first foray into domestic,im commercial
****ING KEEP IT LADS ITS ALL YOURS
and theres a periodic and repairs available too
 
Last edited by a moderator:
R

rumrunner

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
thanks everyone,fitting db tomorrow,**** his tenants,i dont care if they die of smoke inhallation
i agree its not your problem if hes not paying for them then thats it ,if somone dies its his problem not yours ,also im sure that 5 pound smokes from BnQ satisfy the legalaties,maybee he will give you a pint for screwing them on the ceiling ,no maybee just a half ,hes obviously a tight [email protected]:eek:
 
T

tony.towa

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Part B of Building Regs requires all new and refurbished dwelling houses to be fitted with suitable fire detection and alarm system.
 
G

greekislandlover

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
It's amazing what landlords try to get out of. I was called to a fault in the lighting in a rented property recently. The landlord had bought his house off the council and was letting it back to them via an agency. To cut a long story short, I would have failed it on a periodic for several reasons and would have recommended a rewire as it was that bad. The tennant had only just moved in, and I asked if there was a change of occupancy inspection done. Apparently not - the letting agency seemed to think it was not mandatory to do this, and the owner didn't want to spend any money so it wasn't going to happen - let alone put right the faults.

Landlords are difficult to deal with sometimes, and I guess that the chances are that nothing bad is going to happen if they save a few quid by non compliance. All you can do is put it in writing somewhere that you have recommended fitting the alarms to be in compliance with part B (or whatever) to cover yourself. I don't know what happened about the council house re-let, but we did notify the council of the situation, and I can't imagine that they would do anything other than follow it up as they might be liable. I think the guy might find letting the property to clients with money impossible, as nobody in their right mind would live there. Therefore, he is reliant on council / housing association for lettings and they do have standards in place. Hope he's lost their business, or had to comply.
 
T

tony.towa

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
I agree 100% with greeislandlover. Put your recommendations in writing and keep a copy. Cover yourself. If the landlord does not care about his tenants he won't give a chuff about you if, God forbid, something goes horribly wrong in the future.
 

ian.settle1

-
Mentor
Arms
As I have said previously check with the local authority with regards to any smoke alarms as if he is not registered with council it was announced the is a fine upto £20,000 for not registering so watch out if he is not and is caught he may try to drag you down with himself.
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
The local authority have nothing to do with the regs.

As stated in the regs and previously, it is only new, refurbished or extended properties that require smoke detectors.

However, i think that local authority housing normally put them in.

By all means mark it on the cert (there is a box on the NICEIC certs for this) to cover yourself but its really nothing to worry about. You have done all that is required.
 

ian.settle1

-
Mentor
Arms
The local authority have nothing to do with the regs.

As stated in the regs and previously, it is only new, refurbished or extended properties that require smoke detectors.

However, i think that local authority housing normally put them in.

By all means mark it on the cert (there is a box on the NICEIC certs for this) to cover yourself but its really nothing to worry about. You have done all that is required.
Not talking about local authority dealing with regs but with the fact that any property which is to be rented by a landlord has to be regiistered with the local council to make sure that it is of a correct standard for renting and not a death trap:rolleyes:
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
any property which is to be rented by a landlord has to be regiistered with the local council to make sure that it is of a correct standard for renting and not a death trap:rolleyes:
Not doubting you at all, but, thats the first ive heard of that.

I have been renting from a private landlord for over ten years and not once has an electrician been in to do an inspection.

Not that there is anything substandard as the house is only ten years old.

Oh, and of course, i live here.:D
 

ian.settle1

-
Mentor
Arms
Not doubting you at all, but, thats the first ive heard of that.

I have been renting from a private landlord for over ten years and not once has an electrician been in to do an inspection.

Not that there is anything substandard as the house is only ten years old.

Oh, and of course, i live here.:D

A couple of years ago the was a campaign on the radio and tele stating that landlords had by a certain to register with local authority by a certain date if not they could receive a fine of upto £20,000.
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
A couple of years ago the was a campaign on the radio and tele stating that landlords had by a certain to register with local authority by a certain date if not they could receive a fine of upto £20,000.
Cripes.

i better give them a nudge then coz i dont want my rent going up to pay his fine!:D
 

ian.settle1

-
Mentor
Arms
Cripes.

i better give them a nudge then coz i dont want my rent going up to pay his fine!:D
Another one as of today landlords have to have an energy rating survey carried out on properties and must be shown to people renting their property. Not to sure if this is all or just to new renters of property.
 
F

fi601

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
i know its a bit late but smoke detectors are compulsory and they have to be mains operated with battery back up... and they have to interlink with each other, one goes off they all go off
 
N

ninjadeathstalk

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #21
Here's a link you may find useful on the Periodic Inspection Report andFire Alarm & Smoke Detector Inspection and Testing of private rented accomidation:
Landlord Safety Certificates and Safety Reports for Landlords.

and also this excerpt from the Landlords Safety Log Book For Rented Properties within Mid Beds district council, but I would assume that all councils would have similar recommendations, it is also a recommendation of the NICEIC and ECA as can be seen below:

"Landlords Safety Log Book For Rented Properties
Houses in Multiple Occupation

Electrical Safety

Electricity Related Facts

• A high incidence of fires in HMOs is caused by electrical related incidents.

• HMOs tend to have more portable electrical appliances that other houses.

• The Health & Safety executive estimates that around 25% of electrical incidents
involve portable appliances.

• In converted family homes in the private sector electrical wiring may not have been adapted to cope with the new, increased usage.

• These properties also tend to be older in which wiring maybe deteriorating.

The Legal Position

The Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 1994 apply to anyone supplying electrical equipment as part of their business; this covers equipment supplied under a letting agreement.

The Housing Act 2004 requires that a health and safety risk assessment is carried out in regard to the electrical installation.

Faulty electrical installations that put the health of the occupant at risk will require remedy.

Landlords responsibilities

The National Inspection Council for Electrical Installation Contracting (NICEIC) and the Electrical Contractors Association (ECA) recommend conducting an electrical installation safety check every five years, with a certificate detailing any works required and the date of the inspection.

The landlord should:

• Provide a copy of the electrical safety certificate to tenants.

• Undertake an annual visual inspection of all socket outlets, switches, lamp holders,
distribution boards and safety devices and with each change of tenant.

• Ensure all electrical appliances supplied by the landlord are fitted with a BS 1363 plug and the correct fuse, if not, replace them.

• Landlords require tenants to report any defects and must respond to reported defects immediately.

• Landlords must also provide safety and operating instructions whenever possible."

The full pdf can be viewed here:

http://www.midbeds.gov.uk/Images/Landlords%20Safety%20Log%20Book%20For%20Rented%20Properties_tcm5-6690.pdf
 
S

Spudnik

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #22
Can someone actually put up a link to a legal document thats specifically states that smoke detectors are a requirement on a rental property?

Lots of them say 'should' which of course is a little different from 'must'.

Dont get me wrong, as i and LABC always insist on them on refurbs or new builds as the regs state that they are required.
 
J

johnnyb

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #23
Always fit smokes and h/detectors in kitchen areas, they save lives and thats the b all and end all about it.
 

Reply to smoke detectors,compulsory? in the Electrical Wiring, Theories and Regulations area at ElectriciansForums.net

CK Tools :) The professionals choice when it comes to Electrical Tools
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom