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Been in this trade for nearly 50 years,with all the tech guides,the regs,videos etc,still can’t get my head around this new reg,concerning main bonding conductors.
If the metal pipes have a plastic insert @ the entry to the building,there is no need to bond.This includes all metal pipe work on that same pipework,internally,is that correct.
 
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happyhippydad

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littlespark

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Advent Win
If the copper pipe wasn’t connected to anything.... just a bit of pipe... you wouldn’t bond.
Electrically, that’s the same as having plastic fittings between copper pipes... or a plastic mains incoming pipe
 

Bob Geldoff1234

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If you don't bond the water pipe because it has a plastic sleeve then what happens if a live conductor touches the pipe? Does this not make the pipework alive waiting for someone to touch it?
I know the bonding wire was there for equipotential purposes but surly it also helps with fault protection? Especially if there is no rcd protection.
I will still be bonding ALL gas and water pipes regardless as I think this is a stupid change.
 

Rpa07

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They are indicating a completely plastic incomer so no chance of potential. If the internal pipework had a plastic pushfit section it could always be tested.
Think of all the 10mm copper we could save!
If you don't bond the water pipe because it has a plastic sleeve then what happens if a live conductor touches the pipe? Does this not make the pipework alive waiting for someone to touch it?
I know the bonding wire was there for equipotential purposes but surly it also helps with fault protection? Especially if there is no rcd protection.
I will still be bonding ALL gas and water pipes regardless as I think this is a stupid change.
 

Midwest

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If you don't bond the water pipe because it has a plastic sleeve then what happens if a live conductor touches the pipe? Does this not make the pipework alive waiting for someone to touch it?
I know the bonding wire was there for equipotential purposes but surly it also helps with fault protection? Especially if there is no rcd protection.
I will still be bonding ALL gas and water pipes regardless as I think this is a stupid change.
I guess its the same as bonding metal tables, sinks etc in commercial kitchens, or not as it should be. If you do, then a small fault could be extended over a larger area. Goes back to is it extraneous or just a bit of metal.
 

Bob Geldoff1234

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Heard a story once of an electrician who was called out to test a central heating system where the customer said they were getting a shock off the radiators.He claimed that the radiators where dead and must be static electricity.A few days later the customer was electrocuted.Turns out that the boiler had a live to earth fault but only when the programmer was on.The pipework and the boiler were not earthed.The electrician was given a jail sentence for manslaughter.
Other than the electrician not doing his testing properly,if the gas and water pipes were bonded then the breaker-fuse would have gone when the programmer switched on thus making the pipes dead.
This is why ALL pipe work that is continuous,in my opinion,must be bonded.
 

ipf

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If you don't bond the water pipe because it has a plastic sleeve then what happens if a live conductor touches the pipe? Does this not make the pipework alive waiting for someone to touch it?
Earthed via the boiler.....whether it's trustworthy or not, who knows...it should always be tested.
 

Midwest

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Heard a story once of an electrician who was called out to test a central heating system where the customer said they were getting a shock off the radiators.He claimed that the radiators where dead and must be static electricity.A few days later the customer was electrocuted.Turns out that the boiler had a live to earth fault but only when the programmer was on.The pipework and the boiler were not earthed.The electrician was given a jail sentence for manslaughter.
Other than the electrician not doing his testing properly,if the gas and water pipes were bonded then the breaker-fuse would have gone when the programmer switched on thus making the pipes dead.
This is why ALL pipe work that is continuous,in my opinion,must be bonded.
If the boiler had been earthed, as it should be, then ADS would of happen, as in this case (should of been).
 

Midwest

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I did a rewire of a student let, a while ago. The plumber followed on from us, shoving copper pipes under the floor boards, wrapping around our cables, as neither were fixed to the joists etc. Perhaps in this scenario, there's an argument to bond/earth?
 
D

Deleted member 9648

Heard a story once of an electrician who was called out to test a central heating system where the customer said they were getting a shock off the radiators.He claimed that the radiators where dead and must be static electricity.A few days later the customer was electrocuted.Turns out that the boiler had a live to earth fault but only when the programmer was on.The pipework and the boiler were not earthed.The electrician was given a jail sentence for manslaughter.
Other than the electrician not doing his testing properly,if the gas and water pipes were bonded then the breaker-fuse would have gone when the programmer switched on thus making the pipes dead.
This is why ALL pipe work that is continuous,in my opinion,must be bonded.
As Midwest stated, all that was required was the boiler to be correctly earthed, I'm sorry to be blunt but this idea that pipes must be earthed is utter nonsense.
 
D

Deleted member 9648

I did a rewire of a student let, a while ago. The plumber followed on from us, shoving copper pipes under the floor boards, wrapping around our cables, as neither were fixed to the joists etc. Perhaps in this scenario, there's an argument to bond/earth?
Where would that stop, RSJ's....metal window frames? It's back to the Cockburn school of thought.
 

DPG

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If you don't bond the water pipe because it has a plastic sleeve then what happens if a live conductor touches the pipe? Does this not make the pipework alive waiting for someone to touch it?
I know the bonding wire was there for equipotential purposes but surly it also helps with fault protection? Especially if there is no rcd protection.
I will still be bonding ALL gas and water pipes regardless as I think this is a stupid change.
But by bonding these pipes you are connecting them to the electrical system, which means in case of a fault they may have a voltage on them.
 
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