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Discuss Help w Switch on Hobby Project in the Advice for Professional Canadian Electricians area at ElectriciansForums.net

Hey Everyone

I just wanna start off by saying I dabble in little bits of electronics for prop making - just lights and sounds and stuff, motors, pretty basic stuff.

I bought a switch a while back with the intent to use it and did not... I was wondering if someone could help me with putting it into a circuit.
It’s only small 12v 9800amps blue brick battery... for a lights and sounds hobby project. I just wanna make sure I don’t blow anything out or wreck all my electronics... been there not fun!

Again newbie but with a basic understanding... I know I need a resistor.

DS-060
The small prongs have a pos and neg

Thank you again in advance
J

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marconi

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The switch you show looks like one from this series:


The lamp indicator is a red LED. The maximum current through is 40mA but you should stay shy of that amount - run it at 15-20mA. The forward conduction voltage drop is circa 2V. You ought to be able to work out now the required series resistor's resistance value and power rating. Remember to connect the LED the correct way round - you can check for its anode and cathode using an Ohmmeter.

Are your projects all at safe voltages? Because if not a concern would be to ensure adequate safe isolation between the LED and the switch contacts.

A question for you to develop your understanding - by halving the current by how much has the power dissipation of the LED been reduced from operating at 40mA?
 
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I appreciate your reply - but that went right over my head. I’m sorry.
I buy the kits professionally done and just wire them up as needed. All the kits are able to work with 12volts which is why I use those blue brick batteries.
Unfortunately I know enough where the pos neg should go and that’s about it... not sure how to put in a resistor to accommodate the light led.
 

marconi

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Resistor value is (12-2)/0.02 = 500 Ohms. Nearest value is 470 Ohms.

Power rating is 0.02 x 0.02 x 470 = 0.2Watts. Nearest standard value is 1/4 Watt resistor but use a 0.5W or 1W power rating so it runs cooler.

So, buy a 470 Ohms 0.5W or 1W resistor.

+(anode) and -(cathode) for the LED are marked on the switch contacts.

Wherabouts are you in Canada? I am in London.
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Reply to Help w Switch on Hobby Project in the Advice for Professional Canadian Electricians area at ElectriciansForums.net

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