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Hi lads just looking for advice when it comes to Company kit. Things like test kits etc. If they are left in the van and they get stollen is it the electricians responsibility to foot the bill? We are being told to take them in the house. To me this doesn’t seem unreasonable because I have the room in my garage. My tools also get emptied off the van every night and stored away. We have also been told that if we leave our tools in the van and they go missing, they will not be replaced. It’s a hard one because one could argue that our tools are our responsibility. But some lads live in flats etc and have no room for a van full of tools in the house. Should the tools be covered if they get stolen? Are they covered if left on site in a site safe. Any input would be great

thanks in advance
 
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Company issued tools and equipment are the companies responsibility if they cannot secure the van properly ie locks, alarm and van vault that is not your problem, this goes for all hours of the day.

For your own tools and gear during the day I would like to think you are covered but on the night I will say it time and time again!

Whittle your tools down into something that can be rolled in and out your house/flat. A pain in the arse at first but all becomes worth it when you wake up one morning to find your van opened but you've still got your own tools.
 

Pete999

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Hi lads just looking for advice when it comes to Company kit. Things like test kits etc. If they are left in the van and they get stollen is it the electricians responsibility to foot the bill? We are being told to take them in the house. To me this doesn’t seem unreasonable because I have the room in my garage. My tools also get emptied off the van every night and stored away. We have also been told that if we leave our tools in the van and they go missing, they will not be replaced. It’s a hard one because one could argue that our tools are our responsibility. But some lads live in flats etc and have no room for a van full of tools in the house. Should the tools be covered if they get stolen? Are they covered if left on site in a site safe. Any input would be great

thanks in advance
Doesn't the company in question have all this kit insured? or is it as difficult as the sole trader to insure tools of the trade?
 

littlespark

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Company vans should have van insurance to cover all the kit inside.
I think mine as self employed is covered for a couple grand for tools and materials.
Which doesn’t quite cover everything if I had to replace with new.
Any insurance company will pay out if all reasonable steps were taken. Ie, don’t leave the van unlocked.
 
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  • #5
Doesn't the company in question have all this kit insured? or is it as difficult as the sole trader to insure tools of the trade?
They are saying that the vans are insured if they are at the office. But not outside our houses. I take a van home.
 

Pete999

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They are saying that the vans are insured if they are at the office. But not outside our houses. I take a van home.
What about when you are travelling between jobs? or parked on site? sounds like BS to me
 
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  • #7
Company issued tools and equipment are the companies responsibility if they cannot secure the van properly ie locks, alarm and van vault that is not your problem, this goes for all hours of the day.

For your own tools and gear during the day I would like to think you are covered but on the night I will say it time and time again!

Whittle your tools down into something that can be rolled in and out your house/flat. A pain in the arse at first but all becomes worth it when you wake up one morning to find your van opened but you've still got your own tools.
They are saying we need to empty all company kit too because they will charge us if it goes missing
Post automatically merged:

What about when you are travelling between jobs? or parked on site? sounds like BS to me
I think it just applies to when the van is outside your house
 

telectrix

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problem is with a lot of insurance companies doing tools/equipment on vans cover, the small print says "not covered if left unattended 9pm - 6am." I'm self=employed and all tools come off at night, even though they are covered. It's not just the cost of the nicked stuff that matters, it's being unable to work while the insurers process the claim, and even then they write down the values, so if you have a £400 drill that's 5 years old, they value it at maybe£100 rather than replacement cost. beggars the question---- who's the bigger thief, the scroat that breaks into your van or your insurance company. i put it at 50/50.
 

James

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If they can’t insure the kit whilst the van is parked outside your house, how about offloading all the kit at the office at the end of the working day?
 

buzzlightyear

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Could you not ask your company to supply a gaurd dog for the van ., any i would be better to empty the van at the
Premises or leave the van and ride home on shanges pony .
 

Midwest

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Taking company vehicle home is a tax incentive as an employee, unless you can show you are on call etc. So be careful there.

Ive read some companies approve taking company vehicles home at night, but should not be driven for personal use between certain hours; therefore no consent, and no insurance if the cops catch you.
 
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  • #13
If they can’t insure the kit whilst the van is parked outside your house, how about offloading all the kit at the office at the end of the working day?
I live 45 minutes from the yard so that isn’t an option. Plus like I say i don’t mind unloading every night. It’s more to get opinions for others.
 
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Andy78

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Your gear is your responsibility and their gear is their responsibility.
If they want their gear insured in their van overnight they should alter their insurance appropriately.
I would NOT be moving it into my garage overnight as the blame would definitely fall on you if your garage got done over. Does your house insurance cover you for their gear in your garage ? Will your firm be paying a portion of your home insurance ?

Would the company pay you out if your tools got taken from the van ? If not then why should you pay if their tools got stolen ?

Is it written into your contract that are liable for work's gear out of work hours ?
 
I think it all depends on the employment contract. My job comes with a personal company vehicle and we're told not to remove their equipment unless it's being used at the time.
 
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  • #17
Your gear is your responsibility and their gear is their responsibility.
If they want their gear insured in their van overnight they should alter their insurance appropriately.
I would NOT be moving it into my garage overnight as the blame would definitely fall on you if your garage got done over. Does your house insurance cover you for their gear in your garage ? Will your firm be paying a portion of your home insurance ?

Would the company pay you out if your tools got taken from the van ? If not then why should you pay if their tools got stolen ?

Is it written into your contract that are liable for work's gear out of work hours ?
I will be taking all kit into the house including the test kit because I don’t see that as unreasonable. If the house got burgled he isn’t going to charge you for the kit getting stolen. If it’s in the house then you have physically done as much as possible to secure it. They ain’t unreasonable by any means but there has to be a bit of give. Like I said it’s more other people with the issue. I don’t mind emptying the van.
 

Midwest

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Your gear is your responsibility and their gear is their responsibility.
If they want their gear insured in their van overnight they should alter their insurance appropriately.
I would NOT be moving it into my garage overnight as the blame would definitely fall on you if your garage got done over. Does your house insurance cover you for their gear in your garage ? Will your firm be paying a portion of your home insurance ?

Would the company pay you out if your tools got taken from the van ? If not then why should you pay if their tools got stolen ?

Is it written into your contract that are liable for work's gear out of work hours ?
Guess the employer might say, that’s okay then, don’t take our van home with you.
 

Andy78

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I will be taking all kit into the house including the test kit because I don’t see that as unreasonable. If the house got burgled he isn’t going to charge you for the kit getting stolen. If it’s in the house then you have physically done as much as possible to secure it. They ain’t unreasonable by any means but there has to be a bit of give. Like I said it’s more other people with the issue. I don’t mind emptying the van.
If your home insurance refused to pay out for items taken from the garage are you sure they wouldn't charge you ?
So they would be happy to foot the bill for new gear if it got taken from your garage but not if it got taken from their van ? Makes no sense.

Sorry but if they include a van as part of your contract that can be taken home and kept outside your house then they don't have the correct insurance for this arrangement if they are saying it is not insured out of work hours. If it is insured out of work hours then you don't have to take their gear in.

Like you say, this is easy for you but an unreasonable request for those who may not have the storage for the work's gear.
 

Andy78

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Guess the employer might say, that’s okay then, don’t take our van home with you.
To which the only reasonable alternative solution would be to pick up the van from the yard every day after they have paid your travelling time and vehicle costs.
 

Midwest

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To which the only reasonable alternative solution would be to pick up the van from the yard every day after they have paid your travelling time and vehicle costs.
As it’s been stated, depends on your contract. Some contracts mean your day starts and finishes at your place of work, not at your home address.
 

Andy78

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As it’s been stated, depends on your contract. Some contracts mean your day starts and finishes at your place of work, not at your home address.
My point exactly. This contract seems to include a van to take home so the working day starts and ends there. Therefore the van should be appropriately insured for overnight away from the yard.
 

Midwest

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My point exactly. This contract seems to include a van to take home so the working day starts and ends there. Therefore the van should be appropriately insured for overnight away from the yard.
Suppose the OP should find out exactly or say if he knows. But it’s the employers property, insurance etc. They can tell you how you use it.
 
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  • #27
To which the only reasonable alternative solution would be to pick up the van from the yard every day after they have paid your travelling time and vehicle costs.
How do you work 9 hour days thow plus 3 hours travel and still have time to go to the office every day? Then take another 45 mins to get home. Can’t be done. Would only get 6 hours work done per day. Then spend the rest of the time driving to the office.
 

Andy78

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How do you work 9 hour days thow plus 3 hours travel and still have time to go to the office every day? Then take another 45 mins to get home. Can’t be done. Would only get 6 hours work done per day. Then spend the rest of the time driving to the office.
Which is why you'd need remuneration for your time. Anyway, that's not even a real situation. The real situation is your company are asking to use your home insurance for their gear when they should be providing their own.
 

PEG

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With the tool/ insurance job,there are a lot of lads using the words "think,should,and reasonable"
Facts are,if you do not have the specifics written on your insurance,contract of employment,or additional permissions,plus,none of the last page exclusions apply....then you are not certain of cover.

Hope,expect and wish,do not help,when £13,500 worth of kit goes...🤨

As an extra,i would say that well over half the folk,who obtain insurance over the internet,are not covered to the extent they believe....some not at all.

Some of my lads pals,have had to re-think their insurance,as it did not apply driving to work...not for work,but to work🙄
 

Midwest

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I don't see what all the fuss is about. Its the employers property, 'you're' given dispensation to take home a company vehicle, at a benefit to yourself. Your employer is asking you to take additional security measures, which is not unreasonable. I quite often see advice about unloading vans of tools etc overnight.

The only point I take, is the impact this might have on your household insurance in terms of cover & increased premiums. If that does alter your circumstances, then the individual might need to reassess, whether to take the vehicle home.
 

Andy78

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I don't see what all the fuss is about. Its the employers property, 'you're' given dispensation to take home a company vehicle, at a benefit to yourself. Your employer is asking you to take additional security measures, which is not unreasonable. I quite often see advice about unloading vans of tools etc overnight.

The only point I take, is the impact this might have on your household insurance in terms of cover & increased premiums. If that does alter your circumstances, then the individual might need to reassess, whether to take the vehicle home.
The use of a van for a worker also benefits the company in that there is no commuting time to account and pay for.
Yes it might be a reasonable request for some, but as stated in the OP some co-workers live in flats with no storage space so in this case it may not be a reasonable request at all.

I doubt I'd be making a few trips lugging gear up a few flights of stairs to take to my flat with no storage space so I could stare at it in my living room all night, just because my company decided that van vaults and tool insurance are savings they could make at the expense of workers' time and personal space backed up with threats of financial penalty.
 

Midwest

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The use of a van for a worker also benefits the company in that there is no commuting time to account and pay for.
Yes it might be a reasonable request for some, but as stated in the OP some co-workers live in flats with no storage space so in this case it may not be a reasonable request at all.

I doubt I'd be making a few trips lugging gear up a few flights of stairs to take to my flat with no storage space so I could stare at it in my living room all night, just because my company decided that van vaults and tool insurance are savings they could make at the expense of workers' time and personal space backed up with threats of financial penalty.
Well I understand we all do not live in residential properties with off road parking, but thats not the employers problem, is it?

My last employer, only paid me from hours starting from the place of work (business address). They cared not a jot, that it took 45mins for me to get from home to my place of work, to pick up the company vehicle. As I said before, there are tax incentives for taking home a company vehicle, that also needs consideration.
 

Andy78

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Well I understand we all do not live in residential properties with off road parking, but thats not the employers problem, is it?
Not the employees problem if the employer chooses to neglect proper measures to secure their goods when the employee is out of work hours. Are these guys getting paid extra to be 24 hour custodians of gear that isn't theirs ?

I'll leave it now as it's clear we have opposite views and this could go on forever 😁
 

Midwest

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Not the employees problem if the employer chooses to neglect proper measures to secure their goods when the employee is out of work hours. Are these guys getting paid extra to be 24 hour custodians of gear that isn't theirs ?

I'll leave it now as it's clear we have opposite views and this could go on forever 😁
Agree on your last sentence. :)
 

telectrix

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if it belonga me, i insure it. if it belonga boss, boss insures it. end of.
 

telectrix

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If anyone should be listened to in a thread about theft, it's a scouser. ;) I agree.
very few Scousers would nick a tradesman's tools off his van. might leave it on bricks, but at least yous got yer tools to walk to work with. :mad::mad::mad:
 

David Prosser

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From what I have read there should be no tax implication for the OP. This should explain why I believe this to be the case.

What is a van?
For HMRC’s purposes, a van is defined as “a vehicle of a construction primarily suited for the conveyance of goods or burden of any description (not including people)” with a design weight (when in normal use and travelling on a road loaded) not exceeding 3,500 kilograms. A double cab pickup may be classified as a car or a van depending on its VAT classification while (mini)buses etc. are not vans because they are primarily designed to carry people.

The law is blunt
As the law is written, you are liable to pay tax on all “significant” private usage of a van – in other words, for journeys that you make for your own private benefit including regular shopping trips, for holidays, the distance to get to and from the likes of IKEA, or just general social activity.
While physically there’s nothing stopping you making the trips – assuming the van is taxed, MOT’d and insured – unless tax is declared and paid, HMRC is going to take a very dim view of the matter should it find out.
By definition, you do not have to pay tax on any journeys which are considered to be “insignificant private use” – that is, the odd or very rare trip which is not regular (such as journeys that are brief and very occasional).
These might be a trip to the tip a couple of times a year; making daily, but short, detours to get a paper and lunch on the way to work; or stopping off at the doctor on the way home.
Infrequent as they are, HMRC does conduct regular audits on firms nationwide to check on private usage of vehicles. And so, if this happens, how will you prove a trip in the company van was insignificant? Sadly, it’s going to boil down to what appears in the taxman’s manual and what your company can prove – your personal situation or perspective is unlikely to be taken into account.
As for how HMRC undertakes its compliance checks, they’re mostly down to common sense. Tax inspectors have been known to check vehicle registration numbers they find in supermarket car parks – especially at night, on weekends and bank holidays. From there it’s just a question of a simple search of the DVLA computer to see who owns and is the registered keeper of the van. The next stage in the discovery process means checking the HMRC computer to confirm the owner or keeper is a company and whether or not any company van benefits have been declared on employees’ P11Ds. If not, HMRC will then conduct an Employer Compliance Audit – and that’s where the problems start.
Taking steps to protect your position
Not unsurprisingly, HMRC’s taxmen will want you to prove that your company van is not being used for significant private use. They’ll also want to see that the company has put in place measures to prevent significant private use unless that private use has been declared (and tax paid). This might mean checking company policies, seeing if employees are made to sign off on policies while noting down business mileage and so on.
Indeed, it’s for these reasons that you may have been told – despite that it looks like you’re being spied upon – to note down every journey made in the van, because by doing this both you and the company will avoid any tax tied to the use of company vans or company fuel. Similarly, it’s also the reason why you may be told to pay for private use of fuel.
While ordinary commuting from home to a job is allowable, it’s still important to be accurate with record keeping. We’re all busy but estimating journey distances can get you and the company into trouble with fines.
As to what to put into a mileage log, it needs to record the van, driver, date, start and end of the journey, stops made, start and end of daily mileage – and importantly – the number of business miles covered.

Van policy
The company van policy is very important. It’s an employer’s ‘get out of jail free’ card. It should be a clear and well written document that outlines permitted uses of the van and specifically what private use is allowed. The company needs to keep the document updated and you should have been given it to read before taking a van out. You may have been asked to sign a document noting that you’ve read the policy. Don’t ignore it – if the company can show that it’s done what is required of it it’ll be you that’ll be left holding the tax baby.

Tax to be paid
To the nitty gritty of the tax regime. If there is private use you – no matter if you’re an employee or director of the company – will have to pay income tax on the company van. There is an additional tax charge where fuel is provided for private use. On top of that, the company providing the benefit pays Class 1A national insurance contributions at 13.8% on the value of the benefit and must tell HMRC of the benefit via a form P11D.
As to how much you’ll pay, the tax charge is your rate of tax multiplied by the benefit that HMRC sets for the year in question.
For the tax year 2017/18 the van benefit was £3,230 while the van fuel benefit was £610. This means anyone on a 20% tax rate would have paid £646 tax for private use of the van and an additional £122 for private use of company fuel.
The rates for the current tax year – 2018/19 – are £3,350 for the van benefit and £633 for the private use of company fuel. Again, a 20% rate tax payer will pay £670 for using the van and £126.60 for using company fuel.
The company, as we’ve seen earlier, will have to pay Class 1A national insurance contributions at 13.8% on the £3,983 value of the benefits – you’ll recall the £3,350 for the van and £633 for the fuel – a total of £549.65. However, it can set this charge against its tax bill.
 

Midwest

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Arms
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From what I have read there should be no tax implication for the OP. This should explain why I believe this to be the case.

What is a van?
For HMRC’s purposes, a van is defined as “a vehicle of a construction primarily suited for the conveyance of goods or burden of any description (not including people)” with a design weight (when in normal use and travelling on a road loaded) not exceeding 3,500 kilograms. A double cab pickup may be classified as a car or a van depending on its VAT classification while (mini)buses etc. are not vans because they are primarily designed to carry people.

The law is blunt
As the law is written, you are liable to pay tax on all “significant” private usage of a van – in other words, for journeys that you make for your own private benefit including regular shopping trips, for holidays, the distance to get to and from the likes of IKEA, or just general social activity.
While physically there’s nothing stopping you making the trips – assuming the van is taxed, MOT’d and insured – unless tax is declared and paid, HMRC is going to take a very dim view of the matter should it find out.
By definition, you do not have to pay tax on any journeys which are considered to be “insignificant private use” – that is, the odd or very rare trip which is not regular (such as journeys that are brief and very occasional).
These might be a trip to the tip a couple of times a year; making daily, but short, detours to get a paper and lunch on the way to work; or stopping off at the doctor on the way home.
Infrequent as they are, HMRC does conduct regular audits on firms nationwide to check on private usage of vehicles. And so, if this happens, how will you prove a trip in the company van was insignificant? Sadly, it’s going to boil down to what appears in the taxman’s manual and what your company can prove – your personal situation or perspective is unlikely to be taken into account.
As for how HMRC undertakes its compliance checks, they’re mostly down to common sense. Tax inspectors have been known to check vehicle registration numbers they find in supermarket car parks – especially at night, on weekends and bank holidays. From there it’s just a question of a simple search of the DVLA computer to see who owns and is the registered keeper of the van. The next stage in the discovery process means checking the HMRC computer to confirm the owner or keeper is a company and whether or not any company van benefits have been declared on employees’ P11Ds. If not, HMRC will then conduct an Employer Compliance Audit – and that’s where the problems start.
Taking steps to protect your position
Not unsurprisingly, HMRC’s taxmen will want you to prove that your company van is not being used for significant private use. They’ll also want to see that the company has put in place measures to prevent significant private use unless that private use has been declared (and tax paid). This might mean checking company policies, seeing if employees are made to sign off on policies while noting down business mileage and so on.
Indeed, it’s for these reasons that you may have been told – despite that it looks like you’re being spied upon – to note down every journey made in the van, because by doing this both you and the company will avoid any tax tied to the use of company vans or company fuel. Similarly, it’s also the reason why you may be told to pay for private use of fuel.
While ordinary commuting from home to a job is allowable, it’s still important to be accurate with record keeping. We’re all busy but estimating journey distances can get you and the company into trouble with fines.
As to what to put into a mileage log, it needs to record the van, driver, date, start and end of the journey, stops made, start and end of daily mileage – and importantly – the number of business miles covered.

Van policy
The company van policy is very important. It’s an employer’s ‘get out of jail free’ card. It should be a clear and well written document that outlines permitted uses of the van and specifically what private use is allowed. The company needs to keep the document updated and you should have been given it to read before taking a van out. You may have been asked to sign a document noting that you’ve read the policy. Don’t ignore it – if the company can show that it’s done what is required of it it’ll be you that’ll be left holding the tax baby.

Tax to be paid
To the nitty gritty of the tax regime. If there is private use you – no matter if you’re an employee or director of the company – will have to pay income tax on the company van. There is an additional tax charge where fuel is provided for private use. On top of that, the company providing the benefit pays Class 1A national insurance contributions at 13.8% on the value of the benefit and must tell HMRC of the benefit via a form P11D.
As to how much you’ll pay, the tax charge is your rate of tax multiplied by the benefit that HMRC sets for the year in question.
For the tax year 2017/18 the van benefit was £3,230 while the van fuel benefit was £610. This means anyone on a 20% tax rate would have paid £646 tax for private use of the van and an additional £122 for private use of company fuel.
The rates for the current tax year – 2018/19 – are £3,350 for the van benefit and £633 for the private use of company fuel. Again, a 20% rate tax payer will pay £670 for using the van and £126.60 for using company fuel.
The company, as we’ve seen earlier, will have to pay Class 1A national insurance contributions at 13.8% on the £3,983 value of the benefits – you’ll recall the £3,350 for the van and £633 for the fuel – a total of £549.65. However, it can set this charge against its tax bill.
That’s what I said. :)
 

edexlab

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Arms
From what I have read there should be no tax implication for the OP. This should explain why I believe this to be the case.

What is a van?
For HMRC’s purposes, a van is defined as “a vehicle of a construction primarily suited for the conveyance of goods or burden of any description (not including people)” with a design weight (when in normal use and travelling on a road loaded) not exceeding 3,500 kilograms. A double cab pickup may be classified as a car or a van depending on its VAT classification while (mini)buses etc. are not vans because they are primarily designed to carry people.

The law is blunt
As the law is written, you are liable to pay tax on all “significant” private usage of a van – in other words, for journeys that you make for your own private benefit including regular shopping trips, for holidays, the distance to get to and from the likes of IKEA, or just general social activity.
While physically there’s nothing stopping you making the trips – assuming the van is taxed, MOT’d and insured – unless tax is declared and paid, HMRC is going to take a very dim view of the matter should it find out.
By definition, you do not have to pay tax on any journeys which are considered to be “insignificant private use” – that is, the odd or very rare trip which is not regular (such as journeys that are brief and very occasional).
These might be a trip to the tip a couple of times a year; making daily, but short, detours to get a paper and lunch on the way to work; or stopping off at the doctor on the way home.
Infrequent as they are, HMRC does conduct regular audits on firms nationwide to check on private usage of vehicles. And so, if this happens, how will you prove a trip in the company van was insignificant? Sadly, it’s going to boil down to what appears in the taxman’s manual and what your company can prove – your personal situation or perspective is unlikely to be taken into account.
As for how HMRC undertakes its compliance checks, they’re mostly down to common sense. Tax inspectors have been known to check vehicle registration numbers they find in supermarket car parks – especially at night, on weekends and bank holidays. From there it’s just a question of a simple search of the DVLA computer to see who owns and is the registered keeper of the van. The next stage in the discovery process means checking the HMRC computer to confirm the owner or keeper is a company and whether or not any company van benefits have been declared on employees’ P11Ds. If not, HMRC will then conduct an Employer Compliance Audit – and that’s where the problems start.
Taking steps to protect your position
Not unsurprisingly, HMRC’s taxmen will want you to prove that your company van is not being used for significant private use. They’ll also want to see that the company has put in place measures to prevent significant private use unless that private use has been declared (and tax paid). This might mean checking company policies, seeing if employees are made to sign off on policies while noting down business mileage and so on.
Indeed, it’s for these reasons that you may have been told – despite that it looks like you’re being spied upon – to note down every journey made in the van, because by doing this both you and the company will avoid any tax tied to the use of company vans or company fuel. Similarly, it’s also the reason why you may be told to pay for private use of fuel.
While ordinary commuting from home to a job is allowable, it’s still important to be accurate with record keeping. We’re all busy but estimating journey distances can get you and the company into trouble with fines.
As to what to put into a mileage log, it needs to record the van, driver, date, start and end of the journey, stops made, start and end of daily mileage – and importantly – the number of business miles covered.

Van policy
The company van policy is very important. It’s an employer’s ‘get out of jail free’ card. It should be a clear and well written document that outlines permitted uses of the van and specifically what private use is allowed. The company needs to keep the document updated and you should have been given it to read before taking a van out. You may have been asked to sign a document noting that you’ve read the policy. Don’t ignore it – if the company can show that it’s done what is required of it it’ll be you that’ll be left holding the tax baby.

Tax to be paid
To the nitty gritty of the tax regime. If there is private use you – no matter if you’re an employee or director of the company – will have to pay income tax on the company van. There is an additional tax charge where fuel is provided for private use. On top of that, the company providing the benefit pays Class 1A national insurance contributions at 13.8% on the value of the benefit and must tell HMRC of the benefit via a form P11D.
As to how much you’ll pay, the tax charge is your rate of tax multiplied by the benefit that HMRC sets for the year in question.
For the tax year 2017/18 the van benefit was £3,230 while the van fuel benefit was £610. This means anyone on a 20% tax rate would have paid £646 tax for private use of the van and an additional £122 for private use of company fuel.
The rates for the current tax year – 2018/19 – are £3,350 for the van benefit and £633 for the private use of company fuel. Again, a 20% rate tax payer will pay £670 for using the van and £126.60 for using company fuel.
The company, as we’ve seen earlier, will have to pay Class 1A national insurance contributions at 13.8% on the £3,983 value of the benefits – you’ll recall the £3,350 for the van and £633 for the fuel – a total of £549.65. However, it can set this charge against its tax bill.
Several of my colleagues have private mileage on their Company Van's this last year and they've all had their tax codes adjusted to just under 4K a year !

They're not happy as they were told it would be a similar amount as in David's post

It's being looked into over the last 6 months but no answers as yet so I don't know if it's an error someones made or if they'll get a rebate next year

I've never done it so I don't know how it works in reality
Post automatically merged:

In regard to the OP I worked for a Company that did the same except they bullied and threatened people financially

It was a case of them limiting the insurance bills, they'd had several Van's broken into and as they had inadequate insurance they then had to replace a lot of equipment themselves,
This tactic was their response the insurance level remained the same
 
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Van got done last night. Nothing left in the van so nothing stollen and I go to work today a happy man with my weekend unspoilt
 
Several of my colleagues have private mileage on their Company Van's this last year and they've all had their tax codes adjusted to just under 4K a year !

They're not happy as they were told it would be a similar amount as in David's post

It's being looked into over the last 6 months but no answers as yet so I don't know if it's an error someones made or if they'll get a rebate next year

I've never done it so I don't know how it works in reality
Post automatically merged:

In regard to the OP I worked for a Company that did the same except they bullied and threatened people financially

It was a case of them limiting the insurance bills, they'd had several Van's broken into and as they had inadequate insurance they then had to replace a lot of equipment themselves,
This tactic was their response the insurance level remained the same
Your tax code is reduced as following
£3,430 for the vehicle
£655 for private fuel

This reduces your standard tax free allowance to £8,415

You don't pay the full amount only 20% of it for a basic rate tax payer so the additional tax would be £817 unless you earn over £34,500 a year.
 

Andy78

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Van got done last night. Nothing left in the van so nothing stollen and I go to work today a happy man with my weekend unspoilt
Glad your tools are ok. Nothing worse in the job than losing them.

Time for a serious chat with the boss about liability and insurance after this event. Unfortunately thieves do return to vans and next time they might try your garage. You need to know where you stand in the event of their gear going missing from your garage. Check with your insurance too.

Seems coincidental that this request for tool safety by the workers comes just before a break in. A suspicious mind might think all sorts.
 

MFS Electrical

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Yeah I’d be careful if your gonna moan about it seems like it would then be a case of fine don’t take the van home. Only thing I’d question is if your tools are in it during the day are they covered if they get nicked? If they aren’t I wouldn’t be going out my way to protect their gear and I’d leave it in the van.
 
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Yeah I’d be careful if your gonna moan about it seems like it would then be a case of fine don’t take the van home. Only thing I’d question is if your tools are in it during the day are they covered if they get nicked? If they aren’t I wouldn’t be going out my way to protect their gear and I’d leave it in the van.
This has been covered and I do agree with you. Thy are covered everywhere other than outside our houses. It’s a tough one. I will also be buying one of those cameras that link to your phone and putting it in the window.
 
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David Prosser

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This has been covered and I do agree with you. Thy are covered everywhere other than outside our houses. It’s a tough one. I will also be buying one of those cameras that link to your phone and putting it in the window.
If it's covered everywhere but outside your house what happens if you happen to be doing a job next door and the tools get nicked ?
 

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