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Discuss Led spotlight question in the American Professional Electrical Advice Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

First of all, I am trying to learn basics of LED tech strictly as a challenge, so I'm starting with basics. I've gotten several LED devices. First one is non working LED spotlight. . Going to try to fix it. Checked power supply. 110 in, measured dc v out of power supply is 167. Yes, 167. Is this normal? It's a 40w LED chip that power supply is supposed to be driving. Is output supposed to be dc? Have checked LED chip and it seems to be bad using method of testing on YouTube. As y'all can see, I'm really ignorant on this subject, but I learn by doing. Any info is appreciated.
 
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Megawatt

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Arms
First of all, I am trying to learn basics of LED tech strictly as a challenge, so I'm starting with basics. I've gotten several LED devices. First one is non working LED spotlight. . Going to try to fix it. Checked power supply. 110 in, measured dc v out of power supply is 167. Yes, 167. Is this normal? It's a 40w LED chip that power supply is supposed to be driving. Is output supposed to be dc? Have checked LED chip and it seems to be bad using method of testing on YouTube. As y'all can see, I'm really ignorant on this subject, but I learn by doing. Any info is appreciated.
It should be 24vdc and I’m suspecting that you meter is own the wrong setting since it probably is a multimeter. It sounds like you have it on the ac instead of dc. Please I can’t tell you what to do but please call a electrician and let him do it for you
 
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It should be 24vdc and I’m suspecting that you meter is own the wrong setting since it probably is a multimeter. It sounds like you have it on the ac instead of dc. Please I can’t tell you what to do but please call a electrician and let him do it for you
Thank you. This is just a hobby. Not critical that it be repaired. Just trying to learn something new. Using Fluke meter set on DC. ThAnks for your reply.
 

Megawatt

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Arms
Thank you. This is just a hobby. Not critical that it be repaired. Just trying to learn something new. Using Fluke meter set on DC. ThAnks for your reply.
I’m impressed that you want to learn and maybe sign up for classes, but please be careful
 

telectrix

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if you have a number of LEDs wired in series, they generally use a constant current driver. ( each LED needs c. 2.0V so 50 LEDs require c. 100V ). this will vary the output voltage according to what the chain of LEDs requires, up to it's maximum, keeping the current constant.
 

Marvo

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Power supplies and drivers can give strange output voltage readings if you test them with no load on them.

If you're going to play around with electronics rather invest in a cheapy bench power supply which will allow you to test the LED modules to establish whether the driver or LED strip itself has failed.
 

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