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Discuss testing domestic vs commercial in the Periodic Inspection Reporting & Certification area at ElectriciansForums.net

B

BristolSpark

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Hi

I was wondering and hopefully someone can point me in the ight direction.

All domestic installations should be certfied by either Domestic installer or Approved contractor as such.

My question lies within work done in a school, office, car garage or shop for example.

If you were part p registered can you or are you able to do installations in any of the above or do you need to then be an approved contractor via the NIC for names sake.

Hope this is clear lol.

cheers
 
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A

acat

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
Part P covers you for domestic only. The one type of exemption is where you have a business and a domestic property combined in the same building and the share the same single phase meter.

Hope that helps

Chris
 

Des 56

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Arms
Esteemed
Hi

I was wondering and hopefully someone can point me in the ight direction.

All domestic installations should be certfied by either Domestic installer or Approved contractor as such.

My question lies within work done in a school, office, car garage or shop for example.

If you were part p registered can you or are you able to do installations in any of the above or do you need to then be an approved contractor via the NIC for names sake.

Hope this is clear lol.

cheers
Im a little unclear with the question, PIRs or installation or both ,but will give an answer that may assist

The first statement is incorrect(All domestic installations should be certfied by either Domestic installer or Approved contractor)
Anyone can install and test and certify an installation The guidance they follow should be based on BS7671 but not exclusively(other standards may be acceptable,eg EU harmonisation)

However in the domestic sector electrical installations now come under part p of the building regs and compliance certification for those building regs are now required
The system in place allows the installer to notify building control before starting the domestic installation
The installer can if he choses join an approved scheme that will permit him to self certificate the installation without going through building control channels
In a nut shell the work needs to comply to a standard such as bs7671,but the person can chose the the route to comply
IF you join a scheme the approval is for the sector or sectors that they enroll you for
AN NIC domestic installer cannot use their forms for commercial or industrial work,the approved NIC contractor can
There is nothing restricting an electrician doing any work in any installation,the restrictions are imposed by the client and/or the scheme provider only


PIRs are not restricted to anyone whether they be domestic/commercial/or industrial anyone can do them,but there are sometimes requirements by the client that restrict this work for obvious reasons

With PIRs you are giving an opinion on the standard of an installation
IF something nasty occured and there was fire/injury or death then you could find yourselves explaining your actions in a court
You would need insurance to justify your opinions
You would have to demonstrate competence in the relative field (the 2391 would go a long way to doing so)
Clients or most clients require that you be a member of an organistion NIC ECA NAPIT etc
THose organisations restrict the issuing of PIRS on their paperwork unless competence is demonstrated to them,

Again in a nutshell,you can do any electrical work as long as the client accepts your status, irrelevant of training qualification or competence
If you are registered restrictions are per their rules
 
B

BristolSpark

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
I understand the part p ruling and I am aware of being Domestic installer or approved to work on domestic properties.

regarding the commercial, office, car garage, schools....... You say anyone can do these installations again correct where required. Including PIR and EIC. Does this mean you can complete such certificates on example a kewtech sheet, even though you maybe for argument sake only a domestic installer.

I am aware a client may stipulate you to be an approved NICEIC installer, but if a client was not fussy on your status just wanted a good job done. Are you then able to continue to design, construct and then certify. I know you will not be able to use the NICEIC forms if you are domestic installer but again could you hen use like I said a kewtech form or something.

Basically is there similiar legal req like for domestic apart the normal BS7671, being competent and having the nessecary skills and experience.

I was looking to apply for domestic status in a few months, but have been approached to undertake some installations in schools mostly minor works. Although there maybe the odd new circuit. This is why I was wondering. As my status would only be domestic installer.

Please advise somemore, Thanks
 
S

spark1

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
I think Des56 has just answered all these questions for you in a very comprehensive manner...have another read of his post ,I think the answers are all there for you.



spark1
 

Des 56

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Arms
Esteemed
Quote by me
There is nothing restricting an electrician doing any work in any installation,the restrictions are imposed by the client and/or the scheme provider

If there is no scheme providor to satisfy then the client is the sole entity to satisfy

No IET No council No scheme providor No qualifications No experience No insurance
If there were such a client then there are no restrictions at all

Standards and certification may be required by some of the above for the clients own responsibilities
 
B

BristolSpark

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
EIC and minor works forms

What happens to the forms once you have completed them whether a commercial or domestic installation and you are an approved contractor with the NICEIC.

Do you give the customer a copy of the forms, retain a copy and send a copy off to building control on a domestic senario.

Would be nice if someone could explain the process of what happens to the forms.

Thanks.
 
N

Nenedata

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
What happens to the forms once you have completed them whether a commercial or domestic installation and you are an approved contractor with the NICEIC.

Do you give the customer a copy of the forms, retain a copy and send a copy off to building control on a domestic senario.

Would be nice if someone could explain the process of what happens to the forms.

Thanks.
You keep a copy of the certificate and issue whoever is paying you a copy, thats it. It's a contract thats signed by you and the person issuing the work. In a domestic capacity you notify your scheme provider and they inform building control, theirs no requirement to send them a copy.

At the end of the day its a paper trail, if the poop hits the pan then you have a signed copy of cirtificate to say that at the time you tested the install it complied with bs 7671. Protect yourself at all times as at the end of the day it all comes down to the court case, the more evidence you have the better.

Mark
 
A

andekoch

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
The original forms (installation/ mnor works etc) go to the customer ordering the work.

The person doing the work keeps a copy.

The part P regitered person notifies buildign control via their registerign body of the work and then building control send the customer a letter confirming what has been done and that it is on file.

In my case I dont use my registering bodys forms but just use the forms in BS 7671. Dont have to use your bodies forms (as far as I know).

seems my spelling in the above post is very poor. best I dont become an english teacher or admit to it as my frst language.
 
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B

BristolSpark

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
thaks for replies

What is involved with using building control for your domestic work. What processes do you have to go through for them to sign off your work. What costs are involved.
 
A

andekoch

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Call building control and tell them what you are going to do, when you are going to start, when you are going to finish and agree on a date they will inspect thew work. Follow up with a letter.

Do the work.

Get building control in to do their inspection.

Make the installation live. You cant power up (make live) before you have the ok from the building control officer.

Somewhere in all this pay the building inspector his fees.

Ok if a big job and the building inspector has to come to inspect a whole lot of other stuff as well otherwise wastes a lot of time and costs money, not to mention delays to the job.
 
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