• Welcome to the new forum. We're now hosted on ElectriciansForums.net rather than ElectriciansForums.co.uk - Chat about the forum upgrade by CLICKING HERE

Welcome to our Electrical Forum - We started out providing electrical advice just for the UK - But now we have specific advice for the USA too! - Register for free and share American Electrical Advice.

Discuss TV/Network Cabling(First Fix) in the FreeSat, Sky, VirginMedia Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

DefyG

Regular EF Member
Hi All,

Electrician, not TV/Sat Engineer.
Currently in process of first fixing new build and client has asked us to install cables (first fix) for TV positions.
Have previously installed 2No coax and 2No network cables (more recently Cat6) to each point for the 'now' and some degree of 'future proofing'.

However, with the likes of Sky Q (Wireless) and Sky's decision to transmit via broadband in the future, what would you recommend to install now?

Cheers
 
Professional Grade LED Lighting Strips

GeorgeCooke

Regular EF Member
It is really a job for a TV/satellite engineer. But you need 3 coax for each TV position (2 for satellite and one for aerial). Ideally they should run to where the dish and aerial will be fitted or perhaps curled up in the loft with plenty of length. Use decent sat grade 100 type cable.

Don't worry about Sky Q, the client might have Freesat. Sky won't be transmitting via broadband any time soon, there is just not the infrastructure for everyone to receive it like that.
 

Charlie_

Electrician's Arms
All depends on each clients individual needs..
Definitely go fo 2 0r even 3 x cat6..
This will give you options for hdmi, audio, and network instead of WiFi..
CoAx can still be useful for freeview but not really necessary
But all depends on each spec and budgets.. whether a matrix is being utilized, audio system, etc
 

littlespark

Electrician's Arms
Sky Q still needs the twin co-ax from the dish, also co-ax from aerial for freeview.

Got to think of any future changes customer may make.

I made the mistake of not having an aerial feed when I had an extension built, so dont have the option of Freeview. Sky comes in from outside.... I did run a telephone line and 3 x cat6 from BT hub position for the Sky+ at the time, smart tv and xbox.

Second mistake I made was not taking into account my wife changing her mind as to which corner the TV was going to sit in:mad:
 

Charlie_

Electrician's Arms
I tend not to do the sky cables as they like to pull the subscribers pants down for the install regardless of whether cables are in place or not
 

Welchyboy1

Electrician's Arms
First thing you need to do is have a talk to the customer and see exactly what he wants

Its alot easier than working with ifs, buts and maybe's

Installing 'tv points' can mean a half a dozen different requirements in this day and age
 

45140

Regular EF Member
Remember that you do not need a SKY Engineer to do anything at all. There are plenty of independent installers.

Also be wary of splitting cables. The standard now is to have two cables for each TV point. You need to ensure that you have a dish with the correct number of LNB fittings, general they normally install a four point LNB (two cables to living room and two cables to upstairs bedroom. If you want more points then you need more LNB. You only need 2 LNB connections if you want to watch and record different channels at a set top box. If you do not want that facility in any other room then you can get, say a LNB with six terminals, two for living room and then the remaining four can feed other rooms. If you DO want the capability to record one channel and watch another in each room, you would need an LNB with terminals for a three-bedroomed house.

The bigger question is that SKY and Virgin are moving away from wired systems to a single connection point with a set top wireless signal router that will allow you to watch in a different room wirelessly, so rather than future-proofing you may be installing unnecessary wiring.
 

GeorgeCooke

Regular EF Member
Remember that you do not need a SKY Engineer to do anything at all. There are plenty of independent installers.
Sky do not use engineers for this. They are installers.

If you do not want that facility in any other room then you can get, say a LNB with six terminals, two for living room and then the remaining four can feed other rooms.
No you can't, standard LNBs come with 1, 4, or 8 outputs.
 

45140

Regular EF Member
Sky do not use engineers for this. They are installers.No you can't, standard LNBs come with 1, 4, or 8 outputs.
Thank you for the clarification. I was told by someone who does that work that there are 6 output LNB - which are advertised- the first two outlet being for SKY Q and the remainder for the multi-room or set top box.
 

Electrician Talk

Electrical 2 Go - Electrical Supplier and Electrical Wholesalers
Electrical Insurance
Top