• IMPORTANT: The thread you're reading / posting in, could be in a DIY electrical advice area. Please be aware of your local laws. You're not allowed to provide advice to, or seek advice from, DIYers and fellow professionals in some States, Countries, Countys etc with regards to some types of electrical installations or repairs. Keep that in mind. If it's against the law where you are - always get a professional electrician in to carry out the works instead of doing it yourself. The forum will not be held responsible for any outcome of any applications of any advice sought from it.
uHeat Banner - Forum Discount Available
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members

Discuss 8 Gang Grid Switch relacement in the DIY Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

Welcome to ElectriciansForums.net - The American Electrical Advice Forum
Head straight to the main forums to chat by click here:  American Electrical Advice Forum

Hi,
Hoping that someone can advise before we go ahead and instruct a qualified electrician to carry out this job.
We currently have a white plastic 8 Gang Grid Switch Panel in our kitchen but following some recent tiling would now like to change it for a similar fitting but in polished chrome.
I have added some photos of the existing grid panel both with cover on and off and also the type of fitting we would like to change it for.
Once the face panel is removed the 2 rows of 4 switches appear to sit on a metal panel which in turn are screwed to the back box, which appears to be quite a deep set fitting.
Can anyone advise if changing like for like in this case will cause any major issues?
The BG Bespoke 8 gang gridswitch panel is around £50, so a fairly expensive outlay if it ends up being something isn't compatible.
Many thanks,

Existing 8 gang grid switch.jpg

IMG_20190805_162441.jpg

IMG_20190805_162151.jpg

s-l1600.jpg
 

Andy78

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
You would need to change the grid yokes (metal panels) to fit the BG modules.
Having fitted BG DP grid modules before, I'd probably advise you to choose another brand of better quality.
 

Dan

Admin
Do these have one? Switches & Sockets | Electrical2Go - https://www.electrical2go.co.uk/wiring-acc.html

You get a discount from there for being a member.
 

davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
I'd look at finding a polished chrome panel to fit the existing grid yokes first before replacing the whole thing.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
You would need to change the grid yokes (metal panels) to fit the BG modules.
Having fitted BG DP grid modules before, I'd probably advise you to choose another brand of better quality.
Hi Andy 78,
Firstly thanks for your time to replying to this thread.
Are there any particular makes you would recommend, ideally someone that manufactures a polished chrome panel, with either black or chrome coloured switches.
Many thanks in advance.
 

GBDamo

-
Supporter
I'd look at finding a polished chrome panel to fit the existing grid yokes first before replacing the whole thing.
Winner, search for a manufacturers mark and google.
 

GBDamo

-
Supporter
Hi Andy 78,
Firstly thanks for your time to replying to this thread.
Are there any particular makes you would recommend, ideally someone that manufactures a polished chrome panel, with either black or chrome coloured switches.
Many thanks in advance.
MK or Hamilton, fitted a few of both and they're pretty good for grid switches but truth is I dont really like them.
 
I really don't know why these switch panels are fitted, usually in new builds. They are so unnecessary and not required by any regs. I would be looking at getting rid of it myself.
 

Dan

Admin
Isn't that a bit of a headache then wiring wise. They've just had the tilers in.
 

pirate

-
Arms
Esteemed
The public like them...they look cool...ergo, you must have them...

Oh, did someone mention "new builds"?
 

davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
I really don't know why these switch panels are fitted, usually in new builds. They are so unnecessary and not required by any regs. I would be looking at getting rid of it myself.
They are fitted to give a readily accessible means of isolating appliances.
We know they aren't required by regs, but there is nothing to say you can't fit additional isolation over and above the minimum standard required by the regs.
 

davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Isn't that a bit of a headache then wiring wise. They've just had the tilers in.
Yes, it could prove to be quite destructive to do the job of removing it properly.
 

JK-Electrical

-
Arms
Esteemed
They are fitted to give a readily accessible means of isolating appliances.
We know they aren't required by regs, but there is nothing to say you can't fit additional isolation over and above the minimum standard required by the regs.
I fit grid switches as standard whenever I'm doing a kitchen refurbishment. Worktop-level FCUs for each appliance is an absolute no-no as far as I'm concerned. So too are sockets wired direct from the board with no intermediate, easily-accessible means of isolation. My preferred brands are Hager or Schneider.
 

davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
I fit grid switches as standard whenever I'm doing a kitchen refurbishment. Worktop-level FCUs for each appliance is an absolute no-no as far as I'm concerned. So too are sockets wired direct from the board with no intermediate, easily-accessible means of isolation. My preferred brands are Hager or Schneider.
Really? I would discuss it with the customer and fit whatever they prefer, telling them that they must have something which is not required by regulations isn't very fair.
Why not switched fused spurs? They are more reliable than grid switches and don't necessitate a lot of cables squeezed in a box.
 

JK-Electrical

-
Arms
Esteemed
Really? I would discuss it with the customer and fit whatever they prefer, telling them that they must have something which is not required by regulations isn't very fair.
I've yet to meet a customer who preferred FCUs over grid switches.

Why not switched fused spurs? They are more reliable than grid switches and don't necessitate a lot of cables squeezed in a box.
It all comes down to personal preference, and for a variety of reasons I prefer grid switches over FCUs every time. I've never had any issues with wiring space or the reliability of Hager or Schneider grid switches.
 

davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
I've yet to meet a customer who preferred FCUs over grid switches.


It all comes down to personal preference, and for a variety of reasons I prefer grid switches over FCUs every time. I've never had any issues with wiring space or the reliability of Hager or Schneider grid switches.
It still sounds like you are only giving them choice of sfcu or grid switch, not letting them.choose if they want neither.
 

telectrix

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
It still sounds like you are only giving them choice of sfcu or grid switch, not letting them.choose if they want neither.
surely the OP is the customer. it's stated "in our kitchen". he's asking for advice on what to get before he gets a spark to do it.
 

Matthewd29

-
Arms
Esteemed
If your going to be spending a large quanitiy of money go for something better than BG
 
So too are sockets wired direct from the board with no intermediate, easily-accessible means of isolation. My preferred brands are Hager or Schneider.
Do you fit another panel in the lounge for the TV, DVD player, satellite receiver etc whose sockets are inaccessible behind furniture?
 

Taylortwocities

-
Arms
Esteemed
The reason that I do not like these is a technical one.
I guess that the grid switch in the OP's post is powered by a ring final.
The whole point of a ring final is for the loads to be distributed round the ring. Just look at the switches: washing machine, tumble dryer, dishwasher and a water heater all connected to one point in the ring!

Not at all following the guidance in the infamous Appendix 15, and bad practice in my opinion.

I may be wrong, and some of those may be powered by individual radial circuits. But I very much doubt it.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #23
With thanks to all who have contributed to this thread - Very much appreciated.
We can confirm the property is a fairly new build (Redrow)
From scouring the Internet, sadly there appears to be not a great deal of choice when it comes to 8 Gang Grid Switch Panels in a brushed steel finish, so we may have to go with the original BG fitting as shown in the original post.
We will though make sure that the Grid Yokes are compatible (The ones fitted at present are stamped 'Delta').
Additionally a couple of the switches shown are now obsolete in that the Tumble Dryer which used to be in the kitchen is now in the garage and the one marked Water Heater actually powers the Burglar Alarm system !!
Once all is confirmed we will ask our local electrician to visit and carry out the replacement. Thereafter we shall update with how things finished up.
Thanks again.
 

davesparks

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
One very good reason is that the appliance plugs will already be fused.
Assuming the plugs are still attached and not connected to a flex outlet plate yes.
But this doesn't present a problem, obviously it's a 50/50 chance which fuse will go, but apart from being annoying that's not really a problem.
 

Taylortwocities

-
Arms
Esteemed
I don’t think you’ll find switches like that now. You’ll need to change yokes, switches and front plate.

Also, at the start you said polished chrome. Your last post said brushed steel. Which do you want?
 
Assuming the plugs are still attached and not connected to a flex outlet plate yes.
But this doesn't present a problem, obviously it's a 50/50 chance which fuse will go, but apart from being annoying that's not really a problem.
Ah yes, the idiots who remove plugs so the customer has to call an electrician before he can replace the appliance. Also of course possibly invalidate the manufacturers warranty, though not your legal rights of course.

Chances are both fuses would go with a fault.
 

pirate

-
Arms
Esteemed
Yes, GeorgeCooke, I do actually have proof that the public like them. In my previous life I was in many homes and a large proportion of them had those switches in their re-fitted kitchens, and thus I concluded that the public like them. Additionally, many people in new builds have said they love them, so that's why I concluded as I did. Proof?
Well, not for a court of law, clearly.
 
You concluded that people like because they had them? Perhaps they didn't like them but thought incorrectly that they have to have them.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #29
Thanks again for all contributions.

Can anyone confirm whether grid yolks are generally a universal fitting to any given back box, particularly the centres of the screw holes.

This is fairly crucial as the existing steel back box has to stay in situ (The option to dig it out having gone to the time and trouble of tiling is not something we want to contemplate).

If we can get any given grid yolks to screw into the existing back box, then the job is possible.

Thanks.
 

Andy78

-
Mentor
Arms
Esteemed
Thanks again for all contributions.

Can anyone confirm whether grid yolks are generally a universal fitting to any given back box, particularly the centres of the screw holes.

This is fairly crucial as the existing steel back box has to stay in situ (The option to dig it out having gone to the time and trouble of tiling is not something we want to contemplate).

If we can get any given grid yolks to screw into the existing back box, then the job is possible.

Thanks.
The left and right screw spacing that fixes the grid yoke to the backbox will be standard. The Yokes will be specific to the brand of module you want to fit in them. They are not a universal fit.
 

Reply to 8 Gang Grid Switch relacement in the DIY Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

CK Tools :) The professionals choice when it comes to Electrical Tools
This official sponsor may provide discounts for members
Top Bottom