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Discuss Crimping 240v Twin and Earth - Safe?? in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

N

ngunge

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Hello, I would like to know what the regs say on crimping 240v 1.5mm twin and earth (single core) using red straight through crimps...

Is it legal/safe/can it be done and pass inspection etc etc?

What can I do/use instead of using a chockblock (connnector block) to join 1.5mm twin and earth together in trunking?

Crimping, soldering, heatshrinking?

Thanks
 
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S

Spudmiester

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
I have never seen using through-crimps as a problem. Done it loads and consider it to be a better connection than chocky block.

Think about it, ring crimps are used on motor terminals, whats the difference.
 
C

Cirrus

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Yup, through crimps are perfectly acceptable but where you can, make them accessible so in the event of a fault you can remedy quickly. I have to chisel a wall tomorrow and take tiles off and half a kitchen out to sort a failed crimp out!!
 
M

montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Personally I would'nt inline crimp solid strand cables but I appear to be in a minority :).

As for ring crimps on motor terminals, every motor I have ever wired or seen wired has always been with stranded conductors.

Just my personal opinion.
 
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claire_r

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  • #5
id use a chocky block myself, the connections are supposed to be accessible for inspection and testing and by using crimps that makes it difficult.
 
S

Spudmiester

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  • #6
Disagree with both above posts.

Have seen and used solid conductors in SWA for motor terminations. You dont see it much these days, but some 20 years ago it was quite common and still can be found in insallations today.

Chocky block can (and has) loosened as the copper relaxes, and can create a high resistance joint, in some instances I have seen it go rusty. Steel screws into brass, dis-similar metals, dont like it. However, if done properly with the correct tool (not side cutters) a copper tube crimp will actually fuse to the copper cable it is crimped to, creating a very sound joint with little chance of mechanical or electrical failure, though that is not absolute in all cases just incase anyone starts getting pedantic.
Infact if done correctly, a crimp joint pulled with a pair of pliers should not come off, the cable should snap first.

Yes , joints should be accessible, no one is saying the shouldn't. Plastering crimps into a wall is a no no, along with chock block and joint boxes . I am sure we have all found dodgy joints in the wall or behind the tiles at some point.

We use lug crims on large cables, why not on small ones !
 
M

montybaber

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  • #7
Have seen and used solid conductors in SWA for motor terminations. You dont see it much these days, but some 20 years ago it was quite common and still can be found in insallations today.
I stand corrected :) but then again i have only been in the business 13yrs still.....it not common practice now so maybe theres a reason why that is

I agree about chocky blocks tbh but I still would'nt inline crimp solid conductors, the crimps mentioned were not the copper tube type but the pre insulated tin coated copper type.

Obviously in an ideal world replacing the cable would be the best option but personally the next best thing would be a small enclosure mounted next to the trunking with din-rail mounted terminals inside (as long as you have sufficient length on the conductors) this is an easily accessible point for future inspection.
 
S

Spudmiester

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  • #8
Obviously in an ideal world replacing the cable would be the best option but personally the next best thing would be a small enclosure mounted next to the trunking with din-rail mounted terminals inside (as long as you have sufficient length on the conductors) this is an easily accessible point for future inspection.[/quote]


Couldnt agree more !:)
 
A

andypandy

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  • #9
using a din rail would be good but depends on the person paying the bill
 
W

wayne

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  • #10
ngrunge original question was what do the regs say?
reg 134.1.4 no specific method mentioned ,personally i prefer strip connectors properly sized and kept dry should minimise rusting and loosening (but not prevent it forever)
just seen you intend to do it inside trunking NO ! joints should be in a joint box the amount of shocks that occur when joints come loose in trunking....
 
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A

andypandy

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  • #11
different people have always told me different things i think both crimps and block both r just as good but to a certain point it is upto the sparks to c which one is more suited to the job being done
 
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montybaber

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
using a din rail would be good but depends on the person paying the bill
very true :), cheaper option and probably the most 'real world' option would be an end box mounted to the trunking with chocky blocks inside (or crimps lol)

btw.......I have nothing against crimps :) just with using them on small solid core cables
 
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A

andypandy

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  • #13
i have found that even when using blocks on small cable the screw can be over done and the core could be damaged and fail at a later date
 
S

Spudmiester

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
cant see a problem on small solid cores, as long as the right size crimp is used, with the proper setting on a proper crimper. Most failures I have seen are when side cutters or pliers,grips etc have been used instead. Hell, even seen main earth cables (16mm) crimped with cutters ! Its not on !!
 
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stevie h

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
A crimped joint doesn't need to be accessible and done right should not fail , jb,s and connector block must be accessible ........ Well thats what i was told the other week when i was on the 17th course :)
 
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