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I am currently on 14 days self isolation and myself and my son have had possible symptoms of covid.
My job is EICRs in domestic tenanted properties.
what are peoples views on this ?
should i refuse to work ,should i ask for risk assesments and method statements with PPE
it seems daft i cant visit my friends and family yet the goverment think its ok to enter 10-20 properties per week
theres no way you can social distance or avoid touching sockets , switches ,FCU and consumer unit so how can this be done safely?
 

Baddegg

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Midwest

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Think he means after the quarantine period and his symptoms have gone @Midwest....but even so is there any evidence you can’t get it twice?...not sure I’d be risking it op
If so, he needs to obtain some guidance on his return, but is it really essential to return to work?
 

Baddegg

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If so, he needs to obtain some guidance on his return, but is it really essential to return to work?
Completely agree @Midwest, especially as he says he is in 10-20 houses a week, that’s a lot of contact.....to the op...do you not just drive by to do the eicrs 😂
 

littlespark

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Depending on if you’re employed or self employed, you’ll get money now, or later.

No job is essential unless it’s serving the food or health industries
 

suffolkspark

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The government dropped the term "essential" after a few days boys, it's now if you cannot work from home you should continue to work. If I'd got symptoms though I'd not go out
 

buzzlightyear

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@Midwest....but even so is there any evidence you can’t get it twice?...not sure I’d be risking it op
those doctors working for the government are not coming clean about it
diffrant peaple like self had sneezing tired and my heart had plalpations. I now stated to think did I or did not get it and if I did not get will I.
 

Baddegg

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those doctors working for the government are not coming clean about it
diffrant peaple like self had sneezing tired and my heart had plalpations. I now stated to think did I or did not get it and if I did not get will I.
That’s the problem mate isn’t it, you could have just had a seasonal flu and then carry on thinking you’ve had corona....I’m not sure the powers that be have all the evidence yet to inform us
 

buzzlightyear

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That’s the problem mate isn’t it, you could have just had a seasonal flu
I never had the flu just a bad cold would last over a week snotty noise job.
I will need to wait if I get the virus or not.if I have had it with lower symptoms and me body stopping the virus.
 

Andy78

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The government dropped the term "essential" after a few days boys, it's now if you cannot work from home you should continue to work. If I'd got symptoms though I'd not go out
I don't really care how the government term their advice to be honest. Conducting inspection reports is not essential in preventing the spread of this disease.

The government do say you should not enter people's homes if you cannot effectively distance and the OP says this is impossible.

The virus is more likely spread through surface contacts than airborne, and let's face it, if this guy is doing as many inspection per week as stated do you think every touched surface will get wiped down before and after each inspection ?
 
This is a classic example of the need to apply "Common Sense" rather than searching the government literature to find the exact clause that's relevant to you.

So... visiting 10-20 occupied houses per week to do work that is not essential is clearly wrong... and the OP should be staying at home.
 

NDG Elecs

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Occupied EICRs are impossible to do safely in the current climate I would say. Up/down ladders, in and out of rooms all day, testing at sockets and switches, moving stuff about to get to accessories etc etc etc...would have to deep clean each property and shove the occupiers in the garden for a few hours.
 
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thanks for all your advice im employed however my employer considers gas servicing and EICR an essential service .
 

Andy78

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thanks for all your advice im employed however my employer considers gas servicing and EICR an essential service .
Ask them in writing for an updated risk assessment and health and safety procedure in light of new potentially fatal developments. Are they providing all the PPE to make this happen ?

Ask if their insurance covers them for you or customers suing them in the future for infecting households by continuing to work.

Ask for written instructions from them detailing that they are asking you to continue this type of work during this time

Tell them that you cannot effectively socially distance while in peoples homes and therefore they are not acting to govt guidelines.

Put the pressure back on them. It is their responsibility as an employer to consider all of this.
 

littlespark

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The employers are being subsidised to pay you 80% of normal, on the condition that you don’t go out to work at all for non essential jobs.
Unless your servicing a hospital, it’s wrong.
 

Midwest

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I can see that gas servicing could be deemed essential. I can’t see that carrying out an EICR is repairs or maintenance, unless the premise has been subject to recent accidental damage, e.g. a fire.

However, your employer is the judge of that, and will be responsible if you working causes unnecessary health issues.
 
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thanks for all the advice , im certainly not keen on either passing the virus around (if its that i had) or getting it . i think i will follow Andy78 advice and ask for the full written confirmation , i may end up just refusing to work as i consider it the morally right thing to do.
 

Andy78

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thanks for all the advice , im certainly not keen on either passing the virus around (if its that i had) or getting it . i think i will follow Andy78 advice and ask for the full written confirmation , i may end up just refusing to work as i consider it the morally right thing to do.
Please consider all of this carefully too. If you suspect your employer may try to bin you over this, then it may be wise to get union and CAB advice first.
 

Midwest

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I would contact Public Health England, seek some guidance on your dilemma.
You could give this guidance to your employer.

However, you work for your employer, under your terms of contract. If you will need to follow their absence from work conditions.

PS Acas is a good source of guidance on work place matters, including the current situation. They even have a helpline;
 
Please consider all of this carefully too. If you suspect your employer may try to bin you over this, then it may be wise to get union and CAB advice first.
I think a better approach is for the OP to talk to his employer so that both parties can better understand the situation, WITHOUT becoming militant with talk of unions, CAB etc. and 'binning' people.
 

Andy78

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I also asked NICEIC as im a QS for my employer there. they sent this back
they want all members to keep working to protect their business interests.

A landlords duty of care to the tenants will also extend to allowing them to keep their home free from unwanted visitors in this period of lockdown.
 

Midwest

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I also asked NICEIC as im a QS for my employer there. they sent this back
Hmmm, what are the requirements for landlords on when to carry out an EICR. I thought it was before a new occupation, or are these non domestic situations? Could these be arranged to be done when the property is unoccupied?

This is very early days into this 'lock down'. Its new ground that we are all treading on, including employers responsibilities. They are not going to get it right from the off, and we are in this situation for a long period of time.
 
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there are no legal requirements other than landlord and tenant act 1985 which places a duty to keep the property in a good state of repair , we comply to this (electrically) by an EICR on change of tenant and at 5 year intervals.
There is a new law making these compulsory which comes into force July 1st 2020
 

Andy78

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there are no legal requirements other than landlord and tenant act 1985 which places a duty to keep the property in a good state of repair , we comply to this (electrically) by an EICR on change of tenant and at 5 year intervals.
There is a new law making these compulsory which comes into force July 1st 2020
Existing tenancies have until July 2021 to comply.
 
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I contacted public health england and while im waiting for a reply they sent the following advice:
The Government has now introduced the following measures:



1. Requiring people to stay at home, except for very limited purposes

2. Closing non-essential shops and community spaces

3. Stopping all gatherings of more than two people in public



Every citizen must comply with these new measures. The relevant authorities, including the police, will be

given the powers to enforce them – including through fines and dispersing gatherings.



These measures are effective immediately. The Government will look again at these measures in three

weeks, and relax them if the evidence shows this is possible.



You should only leave the house for one of four reasons:



a. Shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible

b. One form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle - alone or with members of your household

c. Any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person

d. Travelling to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home



These four reasons are exceptions - even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent outside of the home and ensuring you are 2 metres apart from anyone outside of your household. These measures must be followed by everyone. If you work in a critical sector or your child has been identified as vulnerable, you can continue to take your children to school.
 

Midwest

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there are no legal requirements other than landlord and tenant act 1985 which places a duty to keep the property in a good state of repair , we comply to this (electrically) by an EICR on change of tenant and at 5 year intervals.
There is a new law making these compulsory which comes into force July 1st 2020
So, it the current climate, there is no real reason to test for the 5 year interval (think about MOT's 3 month dispensation). The change of tenant could done when unoccupied between change of tenant.

Not my business, but your employer needs to think outside the box a bit more IMO.
 

Baddegg

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Personally I’d say no @newfutile, if your boss does anything drastic after that which I doubt then I think any tribunal would likely go in your favour given the wholly unusual state of affairs we find ourselves in....certainly yours is a very unenviable position but your boss sounds like he’s trying to have his cake and eat it, the government is paying your wages or majority of at the moment so he is being quite unreasonable here,tough one as only you know your financial circumstances good luck mate 😁
 

Midwest

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Personally I’d say no @newfutile, if your boss does anything drastic after that which I doubt then I think any tribunal would likely go in your favour given the wholly unusual state of affairs we find ourselves in....certainly yours is a very unenviable position but your boss sounds like he’s trying to have his cake and eat it, the government is paying your wages or majority of at the moment so he is being quite unreasonable here,tough one as only you know your financial circumstances good luck mate 😁
Although I agree with your comments, his employer is paying OP's wages. A lot of the guidance does say something along the lines of 'if in doubt, ask your employer'.

As said, this is uncharted territory. Everyone needs to tread carefully.

I have a good employer and line manager. But policy is changing daily. Think the best collective advice, should be get some guidance from Acas etc etc, then speak to his employer about his concerns. If an employee doesn't attend work, without a valid reason, it could result in disciplinary action. OP may have his concerns, but the employer may think differently.

Has the OP been furlonged or whatever it is then?
 
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hi midwest not sure what you mean by furlonged , on the 24-3-20 one of my managers sent this:
"Gas servicing and fixed wire testing remain an essential service and residents need to be reminded that access has to be provided for their own and their neighbours H+S with social distancing occurring between the contractor and the resident. Contractors are to be reminded to wear gloves, clean surfaces and take their own precautions etc."

though im not a contractor but directly employed by the housing association .

my 14 day 111NHS note runs out on the 2-4-20 , hence myself seeking advice if they say its work as normal
 

Baddegg

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Agree it is a very confusing time and not saying this is the case here but some employers will take advantage, at least us self employed have a clear choice as to wether we put ourselves in potential danger or otherwise for that matter, we can asses every situation as it arises which is not a luxury someone with a bad employer has, the government needs to give crystal clear advice to these people, I know common sense blah blah blah but when people have the decision of putting money before health made for them it’s not right...
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hi midwest not sure what you mean by furlonged , on the 24-3-20 one of my managers sent this:
"Gas servicing and fixed wire testing remain an essential service and residents need to be reminded that access has to be provided for their own and their neighbours H+S with social distancing occurring between the contractor and the resident. Contractors are to be reminded to wear gloves, clean surfaces and take their own precautions etc."

though im not a contractor but directly employed by the housing association .

my 14 day 111NHS note runs out on the 2-4-20 , hence myself seeking advice if they say its work as normal
I can’t see how fixed wire testing is essential in any normal problem free house...unless there’s been a fire/flooding etc?
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hi midwest not sure what you mean by furlonged , on the 24-3-20 one of my managers sent this:
"Gas servicing and fixed wire testing remain an essential service and residents need to be reminded that access has to be provided for their own and their neighbours H+S with social distancing occurring between the contractor and the resident. Contractors are to be reminded to wear gloves, clean surfaces and take their own precautions etc."

though im not a contractor but directly employed by the housing association .

my 14 day 111NHS note runs out on the 2-4-20 , hence myself seeking advice if they say its work as normal
Not if your symptoms continue it isn’t 😉
 
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  • #38
i agree its not usually essential its been ok since last test which may be 5 years ago, as a housing association we have an ongoing remedial repairs service for the tenants to report broken or non working items
 

Midwest

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hi midwest not sure what you mean by furlonged , on the 24-3-20 one of my managers sent this:
"Gas servicing and fixed wire testing remain an essential service and residents need to be reminded that access has to be provided for their own and their neighbours H+S with social distancing occurring between the contractor and the resident. Contractors are to be reminded to wear gloves, clean surfaces and take their own precautions etc."

though im not a contractor but directly employed by the housing association .

my 14 day 111NHS note runs out on the 2-4-20 , hence myself seeking advice if they say its work as normal
I don't think 'we' can advise you.

When is it safe to return to work, if you've had COVid-19 symptoms, best speak to your own health care professionals and/or Public Health England.

Whether you should be doing this work in domestic properties and what your employer can reasonably expect you can do in these circumstances, Acas would be the ones to ask.

I work in a Carehome, when some enjoy independent living. We are only be asked to assist them with urgent maintenance requests, leaks, fire alarm faults etc wearing mask, gloves etc. That seems up for review.

As someone said, have you actually spoken to your employer about your concerns?
 

davesparks

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hi midwest not sure what you mean by furlonged , on the 24-3-20 one of my managers sent this:
"Gas servicing and fixed wire testing remain an essential service and residents need to be reminded that access has to be provided for their own and their neighbours H+S with social distancing occurring between the contractor and the resident. Contractors are to be reminded to wear gloves, clean surfaces and take their own precautions etc."

though im not a contractor but directly employed by the housing association .

my 14 day 111NHS note runs out on the 2-4-20 , hence myself seeking advice if they say its work as normal
The tenants must be reasonable in providing access, however if a tenant refuses access then you cannot do much about it.
 
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it seems the goverment issued a white paper at the weekend regarding landlords and tenants one line of which reads



• This means that no one should visit the property to conduct viewings, or anything else which is not urgent and health and safety-related.

it goes on to state that broken windows , roof repairs boilers etc .. and other H&S related repairs should be the only reason to enter the property.

Thanks for everyones help i will email this to my manager tommorow
 
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he is still saying Fixed wire testing comes under Health and safety critical works
so i guess i will have to make the choice to defy him and possibly lose my job or too take a risk which im not mentally prepared for
 

Andy78

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he is still saying Fixed wire testing comes under Health and safety critical works
so i guess i will have to make the choice to defy him and possibly lose my job or too take a risk which im not mentally prepared for
Everything in writing from now on would be my advice no matter what you decide, including your manager's instructions to carry on.
 
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Thanks Andy78 i cant honestly see how i can complete an EICR (which is hard enough in good times) under these circumstances , were not allowed to visit friends or family but strangers are ok?
 

Midwest

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Thanks Andy78 i cant honestly see how i can complete an EICR (which is hard enough in good times) under these circumstances , were not allowed to visit friends or family but strangers are ok?
Do you get anything back from Acas.
 
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PHE tended to give only general guidance .my line manager insist that its essential work and has to be done ,however obtaining PPE gloves ,mask ,eye protection and alcohol hand wash is proving difficult.
 

Midwest

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PHE tended to give only general guidance .my line manager insist that its essential work and has to be done ,however obtaining PPE gloves ,mask ,eye protection and alcohol hand wash is proving difficult.
Your employer has a duty of care towards you and its client, I know that statement doesn't help you.

They have to provide you with the necessary PPE, I suspect they are saying you don't need the masks, gloves etc!

I work in a carehome, so slightly raised risks. But we (maintenance) have now stopped all non essential work in rooms, which includes compliance checks. Any 'emergency' works, we are required to wear standard PPE.
 

Baddegg

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The best advice you’ve had mate is from @Andy78....tell him you want his instruction in writing, I’d also put your concerns and interpretation of the guidelines in writing to him (email) don’t state that you are not doing it just your issues with it it’s all evidence should the worst happen....you’ll never get any joy from acas they are a waste of time unless something is clear cut
 

Midwest

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Any guidance about what you should or should not be doing, should be obtained from the NHS/Public Health web site, which you’ve done.

Not visiting friends and family is mitigating you and your families exposure to the virus. Your employer sees your work as essential. Think about Nurses etc working in the NHS.

If you personally are extremely anxious about working, you should speak to your employer who would hopefully give you reassurance around yours and others safety. Other options could be that you ask for a period of annual leave/unpaid leave (subject to your employers agreement) or you have the option to go and see your GP, who might acknowledge your anxiety, and place you on sick leave.

(don‘t get the idea that’s these are my thoughts).

Its a very difficult situation.
 
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NDG Elecs

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I feel for you NF. As said, everything in writing from now on. I don't know if you can insist that each property is deep cleaned before you attend. Did you say this was for a housing association? Poor from your gaffer (certain swear words spring to mind..)..
 

Baddegg

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tell ya boss you’ll happily attend every property if comes with you and performs the risk assessment first 😂
 

Midwest

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tell ya boss you’ll happily attend every property if comes with you and performs the risk assessment first 😂
I suspect he would. I’m having to go to work, nice cos I’m still getting paid, but I have a family that I could be exposing them to the virus.

The crux of this thread, is whether an EICR is essential work. Bearing in mind how much this thing is in flux, that will get answered in due course, perhaps.
 
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thanks for all the advice , i am waiting for a full set of PPE before i even consider it, my boss has said that our contractors have been mostly refused entry and it seems to be more about trying to gain access (tho i wont be trying too hard) .
 

Andy78

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thanks for all the advice , i am waiting for a full set of PPE before i even consider it, my boss has said that our contractors have been mostly refused entry and it seems to be more about trying to gain access (tho i wont be trying too hard) .
Knock knock
Hi I'm here to do your unnecessary electrical inspection. If you refuse entry on grounds of safety I'll have to leave and then we'll all be safer.
Great, I'll be off then.
 
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Yes Andy78 that may be close to what happens , just an exercise in driving about all day , I have already got a company letter in case the police stop me
 

NDG Elecs

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Knock knock
Hi I'm here to do COUGH COUGH your unnecessary electrical inspection. If you COUGH refuse entry COUGH on grounds of safety I'll have to leave and then we'll all be safer.
Great, I'll be off then.

COUGH
Edited for greater effect Andy, although it makes me seem slightly flippant... I'm not... 😬
 

Simon47

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Speaking as a landlord, I'd just put any "due" EICRs on hold - under current legislation (in England at least, Scotland is different) they are not mandatory regardless of what any "guidelines" say.
As said, there's no way you could do an EICR safely - either to yourself or the occupiers. Think about it, you go into one house, pick up "things" on your clothes, then go into another house and risk spreading "things" to that house, then another house, ... Goes directly against government advice not to meet people unless it's necessary.
 
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thats my view as well my employer says that electrical testing and gas annual services are a legal requirement as a social landlord (tho im fairly sure EICR's are not ,at least not yet anyway)
 

Simon47

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Gas, yes; EICR, absolutely not. If you emplyer says otherwise, ask for the law or regulation requiring it.
There is NO LEGAL REQUIREMENT at the moment for any EICR for domestic properties, nor is there any specified retest period. What there IS is a legal requirement to ensure that electrical installation and any supplied appliances are "safe" both at the start of a tenancy and during it. This is most easily satisfied by getting a magic EICR so that if the brown stuff should hit the fan, you can stand in the dock and say "but the nice sparky said it was safe".
The "at the start of the tenancy" bit is presumably why so many advocate an EICR at every change of tenant. IMO, a visual inspection is sufficient to look for alterations and tampering - and a full inspection only if there's evidence of the previous tenant having fiddled with stuff. Obviously, part of the judgement will be the type of tenants - we generally have the sort where tampering is not something we are bothered with.
During the tenancy, IMO there is no need for EICRs to some set schedule (or at all, depending on type of tenants). But if periodic inspections (of the property, not specifically electrics) spot anything fiddled with then that could be reason to have an EICR done regardless of whether it's due or not.
 

davesparks

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EICRs are often likened to MOTs, and they have been given a 6 month extension on due dates so I would treat an EICR similarly
 

telectrix

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it's all fair enough going to a house to restore power to something due to a fault, but having to be in close contact and rooting about all through the house to perform an EICR is a big no-no, IMO, due to the risk to health. i'm with OP on this one.
 
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they scots seem to have the right idea while we just get conflicting information down here , i emailed NICEIC, ACAS , PHE and my MP they either have not replied or NIC says its fine
 

Baddegg

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I’d hope your company has also explained to the more elderly and needy tenants that they are are in no way inclined to have to let you i
they scots seem to have the right idea while we just get conflicting information down here , i emailed NICEIC, ACAS , PHE and my MP they either have not replied or NIC says its fine
NIC the last true bastion of integrity 😂
 

Simon47

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Sensible advice from Scottish govt and Select
Yes, that does seem like sensible advice - lets face it, electrical installs don't have a timer set to make them suddenly become dangerous as soon as they hit 5 years since the last test/inspection like Kevin 🙄 Without going and finding the Scottish legislation, I note that it says "under legislation relating to the enforcement of the repairing standard a landlord can be considered to have complied with the standard if the work has not been done because it would endanger any person" - which is not the case with the Gas Safety regs in England.
 

ruston

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I am currently on 14 days self isolation and myself and my son have had possible symptoms of covid.
My job is EICRs in domestic tenanted properties.
How are you both doing @newfutile ? Have your symptoms abated , or do you still have them?
I hope you are both well.
 
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were both good thanks ruston and healthy for now at least, but its back to work tomorrow , im not sure if we had a mild covid19 or something else ?
 

telectrix

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plead sick for a few more days. also could tell your boss you s not prepared to go into peoples' houses unless and until yous been tested for coviid 19 and proven negative.
 

ruston

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were both good thanks ruston and healthy for now at least, but its back to work tomorrow , im not sure if we had a mild covid19 or something else ?
I'm glad to hear that . It is worth doing what @telectrix suggests to keep all involved safe.
Take care and good luck to all of you.
 

Midwest

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It’s alright advising @newfutile what to do, but be mindful if his absent from work without a good reason, and currently he can’t prove or disprove he’s had COViD 19, and he’s already confirmed to his employer a return to work, he could face disciplinary action, which could include dismissal.

Its okay taking the high ground, but loosing his job from a disciplinary could have implications for his family and could result in also getting a poor employment reference.

Here's another link, this time from Unite, giving guidance from Gov/PHE/Acas;

Apart from the obvious, what are your concerns from returning to work newfutile?
 

ruston

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The government are advising to self isolate if you suspect you have symptoms. They do not know if the have , or have had it . Surely caution is the safest thing to do.
 

Midwest

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The government are advising to self isolate if you suspect you have symptoms. They do not know if the have , or have had it . Surely caution is the safest thing to do.
As far as I’m aware OP had some symptoms and self isolated. He is now clear of those symptoms and completed the isolation period. He is unable to work from home, his employer deems his work as essential (don’t agree with that part), and wants him to return to work.
 
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thats correct midwest i dont agree with them either , however there view is i am under an employment contract to do EICR's in there properties which they deem as urgent health and safety work. they also tell me its there duty as a social landlord (tho im not sure why perhaps insurance related?)
 

telectrix

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far more likely for a vehicle to become unroadworthy due to 6 monts postponed MOT than a domestic installation to become dangerous.
 

richy3333

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I think SELECT have coined it the best:

Only emergency repair and maintenance work essential to safety is undertaken until notified otherwise by the Scottish government. Examples include emergency repairs to heating and plumbing and ventilation systems, electrical and fire and security systems, roof and building fabric repairs, attending to lift breakdowns and releasing trapped users, telecom repairs etc. Your own trade association will provide further examples and guidance, but businesses should use their own judgement over what constitutes an ”emergency”.
3. Any other construction work including, but not restricted to, the installation of new heating systems, re-wiring of properties, building of extensions, fitting of new kitchens etc, should be suspended in the meantime.
 
far more likely for a vehicle to become unroadworthy due to 6 monts postponed MOT than a domestic installation to become dangerous.
You can be done for having an unroadworthy vehicle as you drive it back from the MOT testing station...
 
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  • #79
I agree telectrix almost all of out properties have RCD and 609898 mcb protection and the main remedials i do are non working pendants / sockets , smoke and CO alarm changes and filling top of CU to IP4X , its quite rare to find missing main equipotential bonding and broken/incomplete rings and except for when a contractor has added type c mcbs all the maximum ZS are well under the 80% limit .
 

telectrix

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You can be done for having an unroadworthy vehicle as you drive it back from the MOT testing station...
agree, but not much comfort to the pregnant nun you run over on a zebra crossing when your brakes fail
 

Midwest

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thats correct midwest i dont agree with them either , however there view is i am under an employment contract to do EICR's in there properties which they deem as urgent health and safety work. they also tell me its there duty as a social landlord (tho im not sure why perhaps insurance related?)
Thats the crux of this matter. Your employer requires you to carry out your employment contract, whether you agree or not. Did you read my last link, about your employer taking your concerns into consideration. As said before this is new ground we are treading on, employment law might have things to say about this in due course, but it won’t be any time soon.

If you’ve registered your concerns, it’s now your employers responsibility. You can’t take the World on your shoulders.
 
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  • #82
yes Midwest i have emailed him my concerns and he responded with a phone call , they are now purchasing a lot of extra PPE and i will change the way i do testing , wiping down CU before touching R1+R2 at pendants instead of switches wearing gloves eye protection and mask with alcohol wash before and after . also the tenant will be asked to keep away in another room after asking them if self isolating or any of the symptoms .
If any one else has any additional ideas i would like to hear them.
 

Midwest

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Arms
Esteemed
yes Midwest i have emailed him my concerns and he responded with a phone call , they are now purchasing a lot of extra PPE and i will change the way i do testing , wiping down CU before touching R1+R2 at pendants instead of switches wearing gloves eye protection and mask with alcohol wash before and after . also the tenant will be asked to keep away in another room after asking them if self isolating or any of the symptoms .
If any one else has any additional ideas i would like to hear them.
As said before, I work in a carehome. Things are changing daily. Yesterday I had to wear full PPE to enter residents room, now I don’t. Situation is fluid. :)
 
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  • #84
we have a number of care homes in our company but i have been told im not allowed in them at all!
 

NDG Elecs

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Arms
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Can't fully recall the full thread and it may have been mentioned already, but has HASWA been brought up? Your employer has a duty of care to all employees in the workplace..
 
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  • #86
yes i did mention that they seem to think the risk is reduced by using PPE, wiping down surfaces and asking the tenant to stay in another room
 

richy3333

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yes Midwest i have emailed him my concerns and he responded with a phone call , they are now purchasing a lot of extra PPE and i will change the way i do testing , wiping down CU before touching R1+R2 at pendants instead of switches wearing gloves eye protection and mask with alcohol wash before and after . also the tenant will be asked to keep away in another room after asking them if self isolating or any of the symptoms .
If any one else has any additional ideas i would like to hear them.
Has your employer considered that you and your colleagues could start spreading the virus around without knowing it? One of you could be asymptomatic etc. Sounds like the boss has little regard for his employers or the publics safety?
 

Simon47

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Arms
Esteemed
Indeed, that is a risk. Go into one house, pick it up on your clothes, go to next house, pass it on. Short of insisting on a full deep clean of every property before you enter, you cannot be sure you aren't going to pick something up.
You could always knock on the door, and while winking at the occupier point out that you can't be sure you aren't carrying the virus, and are they sure they want you in the house ? Manage a full week of refusals and perhaps the employer will think about just saving the petrol and sending you home 🙄
 
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  • #90
I have asked for a full RAMS statement , I did a retest just of global IR today (original IR was just over 2 M Ohms due to damp) and its very difficult to wear a mask , gloves , googles , head torch and test meter while testing .this could lead to a dangerous fault(s) being missed or even added.
 
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