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Discuss New Career Skills - anyone got feedback? in the Electrical Courses and Electrical NVQ's area at ElectriciansForums.net

H

headshrinker

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Been looking into this company and like what they have to offer, but was wondering if anyone had been on it and if they would recommend it?

thank you!!
 
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stuart john

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  • #2
Hi i did that coarse. very good but expensive.dont forget to add on price of acomadation and food for practical weeks
 
A

Anonomoose

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  • #3
I did this course.
I would reccomend it. They are all very nice knowledgeable people, willing to help and teach you as much as they can. They provide a lot of information on obviously what you need to become an electrician but also the welcome pack with where to stay when you are down there which is good.
There is no expense spared at the college which you would expect for the price, you get a tool kit when you first go with some usefull tools some crap tools in it. Although some of them have probably changed since i started.
I decided not to rush mine as i worked with an electrician it took me just under 2 years to do mine although i felt (not being big headed) i had more pratical knowledge than others there.
At the end you do get what you need appart from your part P assessment including a first aid course and access to a careers advisor to advise on any questions you have. Also you have access to the lectures so you can email or call them with any questions. The only thing i would personally reccomend is you dont do it with your current job as you wont learn enough pratical to be suffecient when you finish. I think they should stress this when booking you need to work with an electrician othewise you may be the most clued up electrician but have no idea on the pratical side of things.
Only downside was that as i took so long to do it when i signed up it was 16th edition and they charged me an extra £65 for the 17th edition book.
Also if you do decide to go stay at the wrens farm guest house B&B. Its nice with off road parking. the first one i stayed at i was woken at 11 with a camera crew outside filming an episode of Crimewatch!!! Not the nicest area.
 
S

suvsy33

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
Hi,
I'm looking to retrain as an electrician.
I have the same question, hence coming on here, but NCS seem to have been more helpful than most.
Price wise, i've found they are pretty much the same, or close to the others.
Are there any course providers out there to avoid ?
thanks
 
M

megages

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Hi,
(snip)
Are there any course providers out there to avoid ?
thanks
That is a very good question. We (this website) is looking for feedback from people who have completed courses so we can get a snapshot of what's hot and what's not.
They all so far seem to be very, very similar, so similar infact you would be forgiven for thinking they are all the same. Tell-tale signs are;

Hotels nearby
Railway station nearby
Lots of on site parking
"Free" toolbox
your 17th Edition (Which I suppose is a given)
1st Aid (Appointed person, it's a 1 day course)
CSCS Card
2-3 Other Complementary qualifications usually C&G's.

Admittedly, having railways and hotels nearby are probably a given given the 1week session cram that's needed but I get the feeling they are all one and the same, just in different flavours.

They sell you on how much money you COULD earn, rather than on the pros and cons of it all, and how much hard work it involves.
And yes, they are all around £5k give or take, then add in the your own costs too.
Elaborate scam? Or genuine article? The jury is still out at the moment.
Everyone agrees though, college is ALOT cheaper for most people.
 
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Steve_P

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
Just got back from my 1st week practical with NCS, absolutely spot on. Tutors are ever so helpful (even if they try to make out that they're miserable - Michael!!!!!). Definately reccommend NCS as a training facility.
 
J

Jason Smith

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
I did all mine at a centre, and it was about 5k and probably another two for travelling accomodation and all that.You will need to do an apprentice when you get off the course, its no good not knowing how to get a 16 mil to a sub main from one side of a house to another, all under the floor in an occupied house.
I already had done my apprentice when I went on the course, but if things were defferent I would go to college do it over three years (local college and very cheap fees )and gain my practical skills at the same time. But its the chicken and egg syndrome, if I took on an apprentice I would much prefer one thats got the course under his/her belt, as at the end of the day, I would want someone who knows roughly what I am on about and i wouldnt have to teach too much ! If I took one on with no electrical training, it would be a handicap as I gotta earn money. Jury is out on this one, I am trying to decide !!
 
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Steve_P

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
In the words of one of the tutors last week "You lot are learning in a few weeks, what took us years on an apprenticeship". I'm not knocking the long way round but as a means to an end, this is a good foot on the ladder (ok, not the top rung, that'd be against the rules guv). Also, college isn't open to everyone so this can be the only way forward. I looked into a local college course but wasn't already working for a spark and couldn't afford the 2 years of now and then training with a few snotty teenagers.
 
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Jason Smith

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  • #9
Tutors out of order mate ! you may be learning an few years worth of electrical knowledge in a few weeks, and I totally agree, you can, at a basic level. However, unless you know how a house is built, and all the possible variations of, you havent a hope in hell of installing a circuit. Thats what you will need an apprenticeship for. And of course someone to lean on when your stumped.( for instance, can you answer all the questions posed on this forum ) If you take away a couple of sets of screwdrivers, and my tester etc, (and hid the stock ), you will find the back of my van could belong to any builder or similar.
Just constructive advice.
 
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garyinderby

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Hi Jason, just a thought? do you know how to build a house? what quals. do you have to do that? i dont think many electricians, time served or not. know how to. most cant even make a hole in a wall. pass it off as builders work. so reason for this reply is. i have done my "5 week wonder course" and found it very illuminating. by the way i do know how a house is built, as have
c&g Bricklaying(advanced craft)
HND Building Studies
BSc in construction management
as well as my new qualifications.
in all i have thirty years of experiance in the construction trade.

so dont think electricians now everything about construction because if i dont then what do guys who have only studied one aspect stand.

helps to remember that learning is a life long thing.

Gary
 
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Jason Smith

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Yes I do. And if you read my words, it says know how a house is built. Not how to build a house. With your knowledge then, you probably wont need to learn these things. You have a big advantage over most others. well done.

You have to realise that kids from school can go on these courses and do not have a clue where to start when looking at a nicely decorated house. Thats why they need an apprenticeship to learn those skills. Imagine if you didnt know the tricks in making good, how to get a fllor board up with litle or no damage.

just to let you know, I did the same as you. I did not need an apprenticeship as I was previously a builder, so the wonder courses, which I find insulting, as you do, were ideal for me.
 
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garyinderby

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Hi Jason
wasnt a dig at you personaly, just gets up my nose the attitude of some on here, surely we can all benefit from a wider knowledge of construction. the problem i think is? some people are to eager to tar everyone with the same brush. im not saying that the schemes are perfect. but as you said only way for some of us. maybe city and guilds should bring back the old marking system, pass, credit and distinction again. could make a difference.

Gary
 
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Jason Smith

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
Thanks mate, Iam all for them, and am from one. My advice is a person must know how to house bash as the courses dont prepare for this. I was lucky, like you, and had the skills in place. Those that did long apprebticeships are miffed- fair enough. One thing they cant do is knock our work. As many cock ups are made by EXPERIENCED electricians as by EXPERIENCED electricians coming from short courses.
 
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megages

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Hi Jason
(snip)
maybe city and guilds should bring back the old marking system, pass, credit and distinction again. could make a difference.

Gary
The reason that system was scrapped was because it was unfair. From an employer point of view, if you know Distinction is the highest grade, why would you settle for less? You wouldn't, unless the person with a lower mark made up for it in other ways and what other way could they make up for it outside of job knowledge? Well if they had job knowledge would they not get a distinction anyway? It's a redundant system.

If you got less than distinction you may as well have just flat out failed.
Also City & Guilds is their to make money, I have Bpec, C&G, Construction skills, all sorts plastered on my wall, but the ability to pass a test doesn't mean if I went into a customers house I'd be ready to take up their laminated flooring and bypass their underfloor heating in order to install some more plug sockets.

This is the issue with these courses, they are not real world ready. Many people can study to pass an exam, it's nothing new, schools have been doing it for years. But the real world has many variables involved and that needs to start becoming a factor in these qualifications. Otherwise it's like many have said, "chicken and egg syndrome". Where people just want you to have the qualification, because of legal obligations, but they need you to have previous experience because their is just too much to teach you.
It's never an exaggeration when sparkies say "everyday I'm still learning", because it's true.
Unfortunately, young people are being sold on these courses as a way to gain a career, and build a better future for their family, but when the course is over, they are still non the wiser. And after spending 5k or more, and with things to support, and a bank demanding the money back, they feel they have no choice except to start working. This is where the problems begin, and unfortunately where people get hurt or killed.
 
J

Jason Smith

  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
I would say there are three things you have to have. 1. The knowledge (courses ideal ) 2. the ability to bash a house. (no chance from the courses ) 3. The knowledge to deal with 14th-16th or worse electrics already installed. (courses no good at all ). A huge bank of knowledge in overcoming problems.
I also have to agree that, financial pressures may force someone into going beyond their limitations.
 
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