Discuss Replacing a 13A plug fuse with solid brass in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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ToonSparky

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Why not disconnect the flex with moulded plug from the appliance, fit a new flex and connect into a flex outlet fed from your fused spur and then if there's ever a problem with the appliance, put the original flex back on!

Fuse behind appliance "problem" - Avoided!
Manufacturers warranty problem - Avoided!
 
Darkwood

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The whole thread seems to be a bit of a baiting attempt here, @John-SJW, exactly what is your electrical knowledge, qualifications etc as your profile is missing such info.
Plug fuses are rarely in place for overload but are covering short circuit compliance to the flexes often used, the idea of replacing a fuse with solid metal jumpers shows a complete lack of understanding on the matter.
We can discuss this in thread or PM me if you want, I await your response.
 
Lucien Nunes

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Recording studios sometimes run gear from CT-E supplies to minimise hum pickup. Muscle-in on Walsall's act and sell them some DP-fused plugs.
 
U

UNG

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I say some manufacturers try to side step warrantee claims by nick picking, and one is that the moulded plug may be not removed. It may be replaced by a sound and safe plug to regs, but they try and fob you off. It may be that the appliance is hard wired in, they will still try and fob you off so they will not pay.
Had a conversation with an appliance engineer a good few years ago on this subject and his response was there is no problem cutting a moulded plug off and replacing it with a plug there is also no problem hard wiring into a flex outlet plate but if a warranty repair is needed then it will have to be disconnected and a plug fitted before the engineer arrives as the only safe isolation procedure they are taught is to remove the plug from the socket outlet
 
littlespark

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Been waiting a few days, thought we might have got the century, but here’s my thoughts.

Leave the moulded plug on the appliance, 13A fuse.
Switch fuse above counter with less than 13A fuse… 10 or 5 even.

With a bit of luck, the lesser fuse blows first.

Otherwise…. A bit of planning beforehand negates this completely. Socket for appliance in accessible space in adjacent cabinet.
 
OP
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Been waiting a few days, thought we might have got the century, but here’s my thoughts.

Leave the moulded plug on the appliance, 13A fuse.
Switch fuse above counter with less than 13A fuse… 10 or 5 even.

With a bit of luck, the lesser fuse blows first.

Otherwise…. A bit of planning beforehand negates this completely. Socket for appliance in accessible space in adjacent cabinet.
In a hidden position, a 15A round pin fuseless plug and socket can be fitted on the appliance, with an FCU above. Then only one fuse to blow.
 
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DPG

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In a hidden position, a 15A round pin fuseless plug and socket can be fitted on the appliance, with an an FCU above. Then only one fuse to blow.

I really don't see why you keep pushing this. How many times do your kitchen appliances blow fuses for no reason. If they do it often then I suggest there is something wrong. And if there's something wrong then the appliance is coming out anyway.

And what about using a 20A switch instead of FCU?

Putting a 15A plug on appliances is not a good solution to your 'problem'.
 
littlespark

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In a hidden position, a 15A round pin fuseless plug and socket can be fitted on the appliance, with an an FCU above. Then only one fuse to blow.
My suggestion does away with the question of whether to cut off a moulded plug or not.

In reality, no socket behind a kitchen appliance should be made inaccessible.
Couple of screws at most, and even the heaviest of equipment can be moved.

The original question of replacing the plug top fuse with a solid link is of course “no”
 
OP
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My suggestion does away with the question of whether to cut off a moulded plug or not.

In reality, no socket behind a kitchen appliance should be made inaccessible.
Couple of screws at most, and even the heaviest of equipment can be moved.

The original question of replacing the plug top fuse with a solid link is of course “no”
Yes, to keep the moulded plug. But a solid link in a moulded plug only gives one fuse on an accessible FCU.
No, the solid links are not available any longer?

If the manufacturer is OK with cutting off the moulded plug, then a 15A round pin is the way to go.
 
OP
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I really don't see why you keep pushing this. How many times do your kitchen appliances blow fuses for no reason. If they do it often then I suggest there is something wrong. And if there's something wrong then the appliance is coming out anyway.

And what about using a 20A switch instead of FCU?

Putting a 15A plug on appliances is not a good solution to your 'problem'.
If the manufacturer is fine on cutting off the moulded plug, then a 15A round in an inaccessible location is the way to go, as long as there is an accessible FCU.

Many servicemen are told by the manufacturers that the appliance must be 100% isolated to work on it - that is remove a plug - not trusting that FCU are DP isolation. Hard wire in a fridge and many will not unscrew the appliance cable from the cable outlet then walk away. So a 15A plug is the way.

Also out of the way plugs with fuses can have the plug run hot unbeknown to the user. The heat is invariably around the fuse. A 15A plug with no fuse is safer.
 
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People here have written that an appliance say under a worktop should have a plug in an adjacent cupboard. Of course a good way. If the accesible cupboard is many cupboards away, with the appliance lead not reaching, then an FCU and 15A socket/plug behind the appliance is the best way around it. Assuming the makers are fine with their moulded plug being removed.
 
DPG

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People here have written that an appliance say under a worktop should have a plug in an adjacent cupboard. Of course a good way. If the accesible cupboard is many cupboards away, with the appliance lead not reaching, then an FCU and 15A socket/plug behind the appliance is the best way around it. Assuming the makers are fine with their moulded plug being removed.

As long as you're happy, that's all we can hope for.
 
OP
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Nobody in their right mind would fit one
Complete nonsense. That is the same as saying "nobody in their right mind would fit 15A fuseless plug behind an appliance."

A solid link converts a 13A plug into a fuseless plug - not difficult to grasp. Guess what? Fuseless plugs are legal. ;)
 
DPG

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Complete nonsense. That is the same as saying "nobody in their right mind would fit 15A fuseless plug behind an appliance."

A solid link converts a 13A plug into a fuseless plug - not difficult to grasp. Guess what? Fuseless plugs are legal. ;)

I know you just try and get a response from people, so I'll keep biting.

You keep wanting us to answer your question of whether links are available for 13A plugs. After 100+ posts surely even you have realised that nobody on here knows where to buy them. Do you accept that, yes or no?
 
westward10

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I have not had one yet, as no one knows if the solid links are still available.
I have been in my trade pushing forty years and I have never come across a manufactured solid link for a 13A plug. This obviously does not mean they have never existed but I doubt they have done, why would a manufacturer produce such a thing, how would they certify it as a compatible component for a 13A plug so that it doesn't affect the safety of the original product. A few years back products were being imported, in particular cctv equipment which came with a fitted moulded plug but no fuse, these were flagged up by Trading Standards as non compliant and dangerous.
 
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So to bottom line.
  1. No one here has ever come across a solid 13A link, I have, or knows where to buy one.
  2. 15A fuseless plug can be fitted behind an appliance in inaccessible locations as long as an accessible FCU isolator is fitted.
 
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westward10

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So to bottom line.
  1. No one here has ever come across a solid 13A link, I have, or knows where to buy one.
  2. 15A fuseless plug can be fitted behind an appliance in inaccessible locations as long as an accessible FCU is fitted.
Several of us will have come across solid links but they were not off the shelf products they would have been home made. There is nothing to say you cannot fit an alternative plug which does not incorporate a fuse however the appliance instructions are likely to suggest, in the UK it should be a 13A plug.
 
OP
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I have been in my trade pushing forty years and I have never come across a manufactured solid link for a 13A plug. This obviously does not mean they have never existed but I doubt they have done,
I have come across 13A solid links, and knew guys who used them. Not seen one for years, hence this thread. They may not be available any longer as the demand is not there. Nothing in any reg say they are illegal. Solid links are available for many applications.

The link simple converts a fused 13A plug into a fuseless, eliminating a gfuse -a s do all solid links. Fuseless plugs are legal being for sale - 15A.

A few years back products were being imported in particular cctv equipment which came with a fitted moulded plug but no fuse, these were flagged up by Trading Standards as non compliant and dangerous.
Those are general portable appliances. A heavy fitted appliance is different - some are even hard wired in.
 
OP
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Several of us will have come across solid links but they were not off the shelf products they would have been home made. There is nothing to say you cannot fit an alternative plug which does not incorporate a fuse however the appliance instructions are likely to suggest, in the UK it should be a 13A plug.
Some instructions do state various specifics. My oven instructions does not, just connected by a competent electrician and the likes. In the latter there are no problems from the makers when making a guarantee claim.
 

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