Discuss Replacing a 13A plug fuse with solid brass in the Electrical Forum area at ElectriciansForums.net

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Doesn't even make sense. And you are just avoiding the questions asked.
Will you suggest another solution.
A 15A round pin is suitable, but it us the shark makers warrantees that is the problem.


Read back on the thread.
 
DPG

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Will you suggest another solution.
A 15A round pin is suitable, but it us the shark makers warrantees that is the problem.


Read back on the thread.

Do you do this sort of thing on other forums as well? I wouldn't mind, but you do seem to have a modicum of electrical knowledge and maybe you could offer something useful?
 
Dave OCD

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I always use solid links in my old table lamps which have that nice single insulated twisted flex, 3 amp fuses are rubbish and need replacing far too often when my old stock Chinese 150w bulbs blow, they only last a couple of weeks usually so I reckon I've saved £££s in fuses.
 
DPG

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I always use solid links in my old table lamps which have that nice single insulated twisted flex, 3 amp fuses are rubbish and need replacing far too often when my old stock Chinese 150w bulbs blow, they only last a couple of weeks usually so I reckon I've saved £££s in fuses.

You trolling again Dave?
 
James

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I always use solid links in my old table lamps which have that nice single insulated twisted flex, 3 amp fuses are rubbish and need replacing far too often when my old stock Chinese 150w bulbs blow, they only last a couple of weeks usually so I reckon I've saved £££s in fuses.

i can help you to save a fortune.
I will sell you as many as you like for your own personal use.
£12.50 each with a minimum order quantity of 100.
lead time 14 days.
I think I might be on a winner here!!
 
nicebutdim

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Will you suggest another solution.
A 15A round pin is suitale but it us the shark makers warrantees that is the problem

The most obvious solution that sprang to my apprentice's mind has since been suggested in post #36 - you have a fused spur above, so stick a flex outlet below.

This ain't rocket science and you're seriously overthinking a problem that's very unlikely to occur. How many such 'inaccessible' fuses have you had to replace and what caused those fuses to blow?
 
OP
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Why would you ever need to access such a fuse? if it has blown the appliance is faulty and will need to be pulled out to repair it anyway, at which point the fuse becomes accessible...
Having inaccessible fuses is a no, no. Obvious.
Have fuses accessible like in say an FCU, which is also an isolator as as well.
 
OP
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The most obvious solution that sprang to my apprentice's mind has since been suggested in post #36 - you have a fused spur above, so stick a flex outlet below.

This ain't rocket science and you're seriously overthinking a problem that's very unlikely to occur. How many such 'inaccessible' fuses have you had to replace and what caused those fuses to blow?
The thread is about two points:

1)
Where to buy solid links for 13A plugs?
2)
Manufacturers not honouring warrantees because a moulded plug is cut off to hard wire the appliance or fit a round pin fuseless 15A plug.
 
Dave OCD

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Very neatly done too, but there's no live pin sticking out of the other side eh ? 😄
 
Dave OCD

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The thread is about two points:

1) Where to buy solid links for 13A plugs?
2) Manufacturers not honouring warrantees because a moulded plug is cut off to hard wire the appliance or fit a round pin fuseless 15A plug.
If you have evidence of point 2 ever being enforced by a manufacturer successfully I'd be very surprised.
 
OP
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If you have evidence of point 2 ever being enforced by a manufacturer successfully I'd be very surprised.
Many Sparks do all sorts not to invalidate the warrantee. I am sure in court the makers would lose of an applaince conform to current regs and it is electrically safe and sound. But that is no comfort when the maker is being awkward. Electricians do not want the hassle factor, even if they know they are right, It loses them time and money.
 
James

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The thread is about two points:

1) Where to buy solid links for 13A plugs?
2) Manufacturers not honouring warrantees because a moulded plug is cut off to hard wire the appliance or fit a round pin fuseless 15A plug.
I have provided you with a quote but not received an order yet.

can you show a manufacturers guarantee that forbids replacing the plug?
 
nicebutdim

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The thread is about two points:


2) Manufacturers not honouring warrantees because a moulded plug is cut off to hard wire the appliance or fit a round pin fuseless 15A plug.

Which manufacturers are you referring to and on what basis have they invalidated warranties?

If the manufacturer stipulates that an appliance must be fused, then this requirement is met as you have an FCU in place. It's possible that they might refuse to honour any warranty claim on their fitted flex, but they'd be hard pressed to invalidate an appliance warranty on this basis.

Not sure your thinking this through as the very suggestion is indefensible. If I buy a new car and subsequently modify the suspension, it is quite possible that any claim for failure of suspension components bushes/joints etc will be refused, but warranty of engine/transmission/electrical components will remain intact. In order for a manufacturer to refuse to honour a warranty claim, they must demonstrate a valid reason for doing so and removal of an appliance plug certainly doesn't meet that criteria.
 
westward10

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Many Sparks do all sorts not to invalidate the warrantee. I am sure in court the makers would lose of an applaince conform to current regs and it is electrically safe and sound. But that is no comfort when the maker is being awkward. Electricians do not want the hassle factor, even if they know they are right, It loses them time and money.
Again what Regs are you referring to. Are you ever going to confirm this.
 
Lucien Nunes

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There's ordinary trolling and there's superior-quality trolling that asks relevant and provocative questions which seems to be one of the OP's gambits. In this case even after 85 posts I am not convinced the correct answer has been stated explicitly and while acknowledging the trollish nature of the posting this suggests that it is not actually a 'silly question.'

My understanding is this: To supply or fit a plug or modify the installation of a plug on a domestic appliance in a professional capacity, is to place such a plug or modification on the market. It is therefore required to comply with the 'Plugs and Sockets etc. (Safety) Regulations 1994.' Part I requires that any plug designed to engage in a socket-outlet made to the dimensions of BS1363:1984 must incorporate a fuse-link to BS 1362. Since the solid link does not comply with BS1362, even if the plug complies with BS1363 and the completed installation as a whole provides no lesser degree of safety than it would with a BS1362 fuse-link fitted, the act of supplying the modified plug is in contravention of the P&S(S)R which is a product safety regulation not under the scope of BS7671 and cannot be exempted within a BS7671 departure.

Please do not be distracted by the option in section 6 paragraph (2) '...shall contain or be accompanied by a fuse link...' which appears to condone taping an approved fuse-link to the outside of the plug fitted with a solid link. I do not think that is a valid interpretation.

 
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David Prosser

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There's ordinary trolling and there's superior-quality trolling that asks relevant and provocative questions which seems to be one of the OP's gambits. In this case even after 85 posts I am not convinced the correct answer has been stated explicitly and while acknowledging the trollish nature of the posting this suggests that it is not actually a 'silly question.'

My understanding is this: To supply or fit a plug or modify the installation of a plug on a domestic appliance in a professional capacity, is to place such a plug or modification on the market. It is therefore required to comply with the 'Plugs and Sockets etc. (Safety) Regulations 1994.' Part I requires that any plug designed to engage in a socket-outlet made to the dimensions of BS1363:1984 must incorporate a fuse-link to BS 1362. Since the solid link does not comply with BS1362, even if the plug complies with BS1363 and the completed installation as a whole provides no lesser degree of safety than it would with a BS1362 fuse-link fitted, the act of supplying the modified plug is in contravention of the P&S(S)R which is a product safety regulation not under the scope of BS7671 and cannot be exempted within a BS7671 departure.

Please do not be distracted by the option in section 6 paragraph (2) '...shall contain or be accompanied by a fuse link...' which appears to condone taping an approved fuse-link to the outside of the plug fitted with a solid link. I do not think that is a valid interpretation.

Just beat me to it !!! :cool:
 

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