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Can anyone advise on how to find out the correct detachable UK plug cable (amperage, wire gauge etc) for electrical items where you don't have the original cable for comparison and the manufacturer of the item doesn't publish the specs for the original cable?

I had previously thought these cables were called 'kettle leads', but I gather they're actually C15 cables (I'm also interested in the clover leaf style). I don't want to buy cables that are not beefy enough, but at the same time, it seems it wouldn't be good to get one with a fuse that's much too large either.

My first priority is to make sure I comply with any UK regulations in getting the right cable.

Any advice appreciated.
 
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Pete999

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Can anyone advise on how to find out the correct detachable UK plug cable (amperage, wire gauge etc) for electrical items where you don't have the original cable for comparison and the manufacturer of the item doesn't publish the specs for the original cable?

I had previously thought these cables were called 'kettle leads', but I gather they're actually C15 cables (I'm also interested in the clover leaf style). I don't want to buy cables that are not beefy enough, but at the same time, it seems it wouldn't be good to get one with a fuse that's much too large either.

My first priority is to make sure I comply with any UK regulations in getting the right cable.

Any advice appreciated.
What are you trying to achieve ?
 
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  • #4
Thanks for replies. The issue isn't finding places that sell cords, but rather knowing what specification cord to buy when there aren't any published specs for the original cord. I'm assuming there are regulations governing this? I'm very keen to avoid buying the wrong spec cord and being liable for some problem that causes down the line.
 

James

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What info is on the rating plate of the device to be powered?
 
O

Octopus

Op .... are you importing a product and wanting to sell it in the UK ?
 
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  • #7
I'm more after a general principle. So let's say what would the plug cord need to be if it was rated for maximum 1A input @230V, 2A input or 4A input?
 
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  • #9
Thanks for replies - are there any rules about how much margin you should leave from the maximum input the device requires? (both minimum and maximum).

For example, if I have a device that has a maximum 2.5A input @ 230V, is it enough to get a 3A rated plug lead or should I get 5A one? Would one with a 13A fuse/cable be too much? Are there any regulations about this?
 

pirate

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It sounds like you are trying to source leads for different appliances/ratings for stuff which does not come supplied with an appropriate lead for UK connection.
It may follow that you might be tempted to buy "kettle" leads from certain internet sources, where the price is a clear indication of quality.
You should be aware that many such leads are substandard, both in terms of the plugs on them and the cables used which are both often far below the claimed standard.
Selling appliances with such sub-standard leads is a very dodgy enterprise.
I urge caution.
 
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  • #11
It sounds like you are trying to source leads for different appliances/ratings for stuff which does not come supplied with an appropriate lead for UK connection.
It may follow that you might be tempted to buy "kettle" leads from certain internet sources, where the price is a clear indication of quality.
You should be aware that many such leads are substandard, both in terms of the plugs on them and the cables used which are both often far below the claimed standard.
Selling appliances with such sub-standard leads is a very dodgy enterprise.
I urge caution.
I'd only be interested in parts from reputable sources - I wouldn't be posting these questions here if I wasn't concerned about safety. But I'm having trouble pinning down the rules for exactly which leads to buy. In particular, I need to know the minimum and maximum amperage margins that should be allowed - can anyone advise?
 

James

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I'd only be interested in parts from reputable sources - I wouldn't be posting these questions here if I wasn't concerned about safety. But I'm having trouble pinning down the rules for exactly which leads to buy. In particular, I need to know the minimum and maximum amperage margins that should be allowed - can anyone advise?
Best person to advise you is the manufacturer of the equipment being powered.
Please don’t take this the wrong way but you do seem to be a bit hesitant to share what you are intending to do with these leads which makes it much harder for people to advise.
 

Lucien Nunes

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The rating of a cordset is determined by the rating of the connectors, the cable and the fuse in the plug. The maximum rating of the IEC60320 C13 connector is 10A, so there can be no higher rated C13 cordset. To handle 10A the flex must be 1.0mm² and the fuse must be 10A or 13A. These may be used with any equipment that requires a C13 cordset. It does not matter whether the fuse in the plug is much larger than the equipment needs, because it is only there to protect the cordset. The equipment must have its own internal fusing.

However, very few electronic goods need 10A, so lower rated versions are commonly supplied as they are cheaper. A cordset made with 0.75mm² cable is capable of carrying 6A and is often protected with a 5A fuse. In some cases, where a 5A fuse would be subject to early failure through current inrush at switch-on, a 10A or 13A fuse is fitted. This still provides adequate short-circuit protection to the 0.75mm² cable, although it does not protect against overload if the cordset is used for an alternative application with greater current demand.

Countries using unfused plugs require a minimum of 0.75mm² cable, as this must be protected against short-circuit by the circuit breaker in the distribution board which may be up to 16A. Hence, there is no point making C13 cordsets even for the UK of less than 0.75mm², as there could not be a non-UK equivalent.

In summary:
Approved C13 cordsets are usually 10A rated if made with 1.0mm² cable and 5A rated if made with 0.75mm². Any cordset of adequate rating may be used with an appliance. Beware fake, substandard and non-compliant cordsets.
 
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  • #14
The rating of a cordset is determined by the rating of the connectors, the cable and the fuse in the plug. The maximum rating of the IEC60320 C13 connector is 10A, so there can be no higher rated C13 cordset. To handle 10A the flex must be 1.0mm² and the fuse must be 10A or 13A. These may be used with any equipment that requires a C13 cordset. It does not matter whether the fuse in the plug is much larger than the equipment needs, because it is only there to protect the cordset. The equipment must have its own internal fusing.

However, very few electronic goods need 10A, so lower rated versions are commonly supplied as they are cheaper. A cordset made with 0.75mm² cable is capable of carrying 6A and is often protected with a 5A fuse. In some cases, where a 5A fuse would be subject to early failure through current inrush at switch-on, a 10A or 13A fuse is fitted. This still provides adequate short-circuit protection to the 0.75mm² cable, although it does not protect against overload if the cordset is used for an alternative application with greater current demand.

Countries using unfused plugs require a minimum of 0.75mm² cable, as this must be protected against short-circuit by the circuit breaker in the distribution board which may be up to 16A. Hence, there is no point making C13 cordsets even for the UK of less than 0.75mm², as there could not be a non-UK equivalent.

In summary:
Approved C13 cordsets are usually 10A rated if made with 1.0mm² cable and 5A rated if made with 0.75mm². Any cordset of adequate rating may be used with an appliance. Beware fake, substandard and non-compliant cordsets.
Thanks for this detailed reply. Just to ensure I have you right, would it be correct to say that for any device with a maximum input of say 4 amps @ 230V, it would be compliant to use either a 0.75mm2 cable with a 5A fused plug or a 1mm2 cable with a 10A or 13A fused plug? (so long as both are properly made to correct standards)
 

DPG

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PerlW90 - any reason why you seem reluctant to give details of what these appliances are or why you don't have cables for them? I'm guessing these are imported items which originally had a non-UK cord with them?
 

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